All articles about 2021上海松江kb

Rare Book at Sierra Madre Public Library

first_img Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Exquisite wood blocks, the work of Sierra Madre resident and artist Marvin (Elmer) Weese, are a special part of the rare book collection and the Sierra Madre Historical Archives, housed at the Sierra Madre Public Library.Weese’s stunning work is featured in Early California with block prints in color, 1952, hand printed in Sierra Madre and signed by the author “For the Sierra Madre Library, Sincerely, Marvin Weese”. He made watercolor sketches, cut out the blocks, and printed the block print illustrations in his book which took him 15 years to complete. According to an LA Times March 6, 1955 article Weese’s book, “Presents the story of California from Cortez to “The Iron Horse” in capsule form… represents a dramatic episode or period of the State’s colorful history.”Weese was a master of wood print art, and beginning in the late 1930’s, he worked on a project that combined his passions: early California history; Southwestern Indian culture; wood block printing; and photography. The detail, beauty, and expertise are seen in each of the 38 wood block prints that completed his handmade masterpiece chronicling the early years of California. For the block prints that illustrate early Sierra Madre and California history, Weese cut out 160 blocks in linoleum on wood and used 200 colors, mixing them fresh for every block. Each illustration required the creation of five wood blocks.An exhibit of 40 etchings, lithography and block prints was on display at “Sierra Madre’s new Public Library” in 1955. Weese lived in Sierra Madre for 38 years, was active in the community, ran the Sierra Madre City Hall art gallery, and had artistic ties to noted local artist Alfred Dewey.Local History and Rare Book CollectionsWeese’s book is a part of Sierra Madre Library’s rare book collection that includes rare editions and signed copies of books with special Sierra Madre, San Gabriel Valley, and California interest. The Sierra Madre Historical Archives include a portfolio of prints from Weese’s book.The Library is a partner with the Sierra Madre Historical Preservation Society, and the archive collection is jointly owned by both institutions. The archive includes Sierra Madre and the nearby San Gabriel Valley area historic documents, photographs (prints and negatives), slides, maps, sound recordings, oral histories, moving images, scrapbooks, ledgers, news clippings, books, works of art, and ephemera.The public is welcome to make appointments to view Weese’s work as well as other rare books and to use the local history archives. Please contact Michelle An at the Library, 355-7186 [email protected]’s beautiful work will be displayed in the Library in August.Read, Discover, Connect @ Sierra Madre Public Library, 440 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre, (626) 355-7186, http://cityofsierramadre.com/services/library Business News Community News Visual Arts Rare Book at Sierra Madre Public Library From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, March 7, 2016 | 7:06 pm faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena First Heatwave Expected Next Week Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA 74 Year Old Fitness Enthusiast Defies All Concept Of AgeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeauty 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community Newslast_img read more

BCCO’s Juneteenth Celebration in Odessa grows as anchor in community

first_imgHome Local News BCCO’s Juneteenth Celebration in Odessa grows as anchor in community OC employee of the year always learning Twitter 1 of 2 By admin – June 10, 2018 Grustle’s Codye Hatcher (23) drives towards the basket against Talkin Heads during the annual Juneteenth Basketball Tournament June 16, 2017 at the Odessa College Sports Center. Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Santi Medrano, 10, attempts a dunk on one of the jumpers set up at last year’s Juneteenth celebration at Woodson Park. 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School center_img ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ Previous articleCommissioners to appoint new county judgeNext articleFinding work is easy, but not childcare admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Local News BCCO’s Juneteenth Celebration in Odessa grows as anchor in community Codye Hatcher’s three little daughters are getting old enough, now, to where they can go running off in the park on their own on a weekend like this one.They know everybody they see now, Hatcher said, as they bounce around the familiar faces and festivities, and even at six years old and younger, they know what they’re in for even before they get there.“They look forward to it as much as I do myself,” he laughed.The annual Juneteenth Celebration in Odessa has become a family affair for Hatcher and his girls, just as it has for so many members of the West Texas community — and the festivities are set to gear up again this weekend for four days of fun starting Friday. Santi Medrano, 10, attempts a dunk on one of the jumpers set up at last year’s Juneteenth celebration at Woodson Park. Facebook The Black Cultural Council of Odessa is in its 21st year organizing its event that coincides with the annual holiday, which commemorates June 19, 1865, the day the slow-moving news of the Confederacy’s surrender two months earlier finally reached Texas, emancipating slaves in the state.The BCCO’s Juneteenth Celebration is set to feature musical performances, picnics, food vending, a pageant, a parade, its long-running annual basketball tournament, and more, centered in Woodson Park and sprawling out across locations throughout Odessa, June 15-17 and June 19.“It’s special for the community,” Hatcher said, speaking over the phone last week, knowing what it can mean for a young family in West Texas, and looking forward to returning to the court for another year in the tournament and spending more relaxing time out at the park.“It brings everybody back together.”And this year, the BCCO’s event is bigger than ever.Jo Ann Davenport Littleton, BCCO board member, said the event is attracting more vendors this year, and that it has seen an uptick in local businesses sponsoring food and giveaways and the like.Musical acts in the styles of gospel, soul, hip hop and more line the weekend’s schedule for the stage at Woodson Park, where food trucks and vendors from all around will be available, and events like Saturday’s parade on Dixie Boulevard, a comedy act at Blackshear’s auditorium, and the basketball tournament at the Odessa College Sports Center bring the celebration spilling out across Odessa.Admission is free for events throughout the celebration. For a full schedule, visit OdessaBCC.org.“To be a part of the organization, to be a part of the celebration, to see it grow, the way it’s growing, with the participation, with the excitement and people buying in — it’s a great feeling,” Littleton said.“We feel that our city is embracing our Juneteenth celebration and that’s very exciting.”Meanwhile, the celebration is giving right back to the city and the area, attendees like Hatcher can attest.Hatcher first moved to Odessa in 2014, ahead of his junior year of basketball at UTPB. It could’ve been a bit of a culture shock, he agreed, moving from his native Tennessee to Odessa, where black or African American people make up a much smaller portion of the area’s overall population. Odessa’s black population makes up about five percent of the city’s total population, according to Census data.But the Juneteenth Celebration is like a cultural anchor for the black community in West Texas, Hatcher agreed — and now, years after his college basketball career ended, he’s still in the area, raising his young family in Midland.Juneteenth festivities have helped make a home out of West Texas for plenty other members of the black community in the area, too, said Danny Wright, the longtime area Boys and Girls Club coordinator, ECISD educator and former Permian basketball coach.“What it brings is a restoration of history and a celebration of a group of people,” Wright said, amid organizing the 38th annual Danny R. Wright Basketball Tournament as part of the festivities.“If there’s a guy who, let’s say he’s a freshman at UTPB or Odessa College … and he’s been around the city … you very seldom see any African Americans,” he said. “If he messes around and comes to Juneteenth: ‘Wait a minute man, did I go to sleep and wake up in a different city? What is going on here?’” he laughed.“But I think that’s a good thing.”This year’s iteration of the high-level basketball tournament is set to tip off at 6 p.m. Friday and again at 9 a.m. Saturday, with Hatcher and a crew of UTPB alums and contingents looking to win a third straight championship — and fellowship along the way.“It gets them involved in where they’re at,” Hatcher said of other African Americans new to the area like him, perhaps who came to the area for education or for the oil industry. “When you’ve got events like that to come up, and those kind of people who want to figure out what’s going on or know about West Texas, that’s one of the great events to go see.”Ned Simmons said he has seen more of the same in his years in Odessa. He came to the area to play at UTPB in the summer of 2005 and then spent several years working in the school’s athletic department after that.“When you get to go out to a Juneteenth Celebration, being at the park, they get to see, ‘Wow, there is this black population out here. It is something that I can get used to, and be around and be a part of,’” Simmons said.Among so many other things, the event celebrates and carries on a heritage and a culture, Wright agreed, and that’s why it’s important that the event has continued and even grown.“We when we first started to do it, we would have a couple of cars playing music at the park,” Wright said. “And the thing has grown, thanks to Jo Ann Littleton and BCCO,” he said, noting that they’re among others.“It’s an opportunity to come out and it’s a secured environment, a controlled environment, a structured environment. … We don’t do that enough. It’s almost like a family reunion, but all the participants don’t necessarily share the same bloodline.”The BCCO’s weekend event kicks off in earnest Friday, with musical performances starting at 3 p.m. at Woodson Park.“I invite anyone who has never attended one, to please come be a part of our celebration,” Littleton said.“If they come once, they’ll want to come back.” Facebook Creamy Fruit SaladSouthern Style Potato SaladSummer Spaghetti SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more