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Two journalists released at the end of their sentences

first_img May 31, 2021 Find out more US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture MyanmarAsia – Pacific RSF_en Two journalists and writers Kyaw San (pen name Cho Seint) and Aung Zin Min have been released after seven years and three months in prison, both of them in a very weakened state. They were due for release in December 2003, but for unknown reasons served an extra three months.Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) and the Burma Media Association (BMA) noted their release on 1 March but strongly regretted that these two journalists had to serve their entire sentence for having simply expressed their opinions.The two organisations repeated their demand for the release of 13 journalists who are still behind bars, in particular Win Tin who will spend his 74th birthday in prison on 12 March.Despite his fragile state of health, the Burmese authorities have shown no compassion towards Win Tin, journalist and member of the National League for Democracy, who will spend his birthday at Insein Jail after already spending 14 years in prison, the international press freedom organisations said.Five prisoners of opinion, including Kyaw San (Cho Seint) and Aung Zin Min, were released on 1 March 2004, on the eve of the arrival in Burma of the UN Secretary General’s special envoy Ismail Razali.The two journalists have been able to return to their families. Aung Zin Min lives in Rangoon and Cho Seint has gone to his sister’s home in Taungoo, north of Rangoon.Members of the military secret services (MIS) arrested both of them during student demonstrations in 1996. They were sentenced to seven years in prison under Article 5 (j) of the 1950 emergency law for having written in support of the demonstrations in articles carried by opposition publicationsKyaw San, a poet and journalist with the private cultural magazine Style-thit (New Style), had been detained in the Tharrawaddy prison (100 kilometres in the north of Rangoon). During his questioning, which took place during the beginning of the year 1997, Kyaw San was tortured. He was beaten on the head and is partially deaf as a result of this. This period of questioning, which lasted several weeks, weakened him physically and psychologically. He is the grandson of Thakin Kotaw Hmime, one of the fathers of independence with general Aung San. His family has been deprived of resources since 1962 by the military junta. Since 1997, he has received few outside visits and assistance. “Two visits in two years,” according to one of former cellmate. He doesn’t get the medicine he needs to treat the diarrhoea and stomach problems he suffers from; his family is very poor. According to one of his former cellmates, he never lost his fighting spirit, and participated, in June 1998, in a hunger strike to obtain more water and the opening of cell doors during the day. The prisoners obtained their demands.Aung Zin Min was a state employee (accountant) and a writer with Style-thit magazine. Aung Zin Min had been transferred to Thayet prison in 2001. The military tribunal had accused Aung Zin Min of belonging to the banned Burmese Communist Party. According to the journalist’s family, he was never a militant of this party.The two organisations stressed that they oppose any lifting of political or economic sanctions against the Burmese government until all political prisoners are released and press censorship ends. MyanmarAsia – Pacific Journalists and writers Kyaw San (pen name Cho Seint) and Aung Zin Min have been released after seven years and three months in prison, both in a very weakened state. Reporters Without Borders and the Burma Media Association have called for the immediate release of the prominent journalist Win Tin, in prison for 14 years despite his age and his fragile state of health. Organisation News Follow the news on Myanmar News May 12, 2021 Find out more Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylum to go further Receive email alerts March 10, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists released at the end of their sentences May 26, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News Newslast_img read more

Twin tennis courts just the start of this grand Queenslander’s charms

first_imgThe 102-year-old Queenslander at 150 Adelaide Street East, Clayfield, will be sold via tender.A GRAND 102-year-old Clayfield home Clonlara is being offered for sale for the first time in 60 years.The Queenslander — named after an Irish village in County Clare — was home to the late Sir Edward and Lady Dorothy Williams for 60 years. Daughter Zilla Lyons revealed her parents bought the house in the late 1950s, attracted by its size and massive yard.“They also needed space for their growing family (the first seven of their eight children were born in nine years) and accommodating all those children necessitated some practical modifications to the original layout,’’ she said. The kitchen is large. The charm of yesteryear. Light and bright in one of the former kids’ rooms. Many shady spots to curl up with a good book.This included turning what was originally a billiard room into a “glamorous girls” dormitory’’ and enclosing a back veranda to provide a large sunroom during winter.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoShe said a little house near the tennis courts was built as a wonderful Christmas present for the girls, which they treated like a large dolls’ house. It was later converted to a garden shed.The home sits on a large 3,317 sqm block of land.Sir Edward Williams was a respected Queensland legal identity, a former Queenslander of the Year, Australian of the Year, Father of the Year, Chairman of the Commonwealth Games in 1982 and Commissioner General of Expo 88. Ceilings are ornate plaster and pressed metal.center_img Traditional features have been lovingly preserved. The twin tennis courts hosted many parties over the years. There is a formal dining room.Son, Dr Ed Williams, said he and his siblings shared many fond memories of growing up there.“Clonlara is truly a cherished family home,” he said. “It comes complete with not one but two championship-size grass tennis courts which became a great meeting place for the neighbourhood kids.“Tennis parties were frequent and both courts would be marked and played on regularly. “Cricket, football and even croquet were also played in the backyard.” The home at 150 Adelaide St East, Clayfield, was built in 1916. Many of its original period features have been preserved including the grand entry foyer which leads to formal dining and lounge rooms. There are ornate plaster and pressed metal ceilings, timber walls and leadlight windows. The home has been well kept.A traditional sun room, meals or family room and a large kitchen and bathroom complete the home. There is provision for a swimming pool, a former swimming pool on the block was decommissioned.The six bedroom, three bathroom home has a two-car garage, and there is a series of enclosed storage or rumpus rooms under the house. Agents Christine Rudolph and Matt Lancashire of Ray White New Farm have it set to be sold via tender process closing 5pm May 4.last_img read more

Lawrence Cecil “Sam” Clark Jr.

first_imgLawrence Cecil “Sam” Clark Jr., 84, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, formerly of Moores Hill, IN, passed away Thursday, December 8, 2016.He was born May 23, 1932 in Portsmouth, OH, son of the late Lawrence C. Clark Sr. and Ann Harris Bedford.He served his Country as a member of the United States Army during the Korean Conflict. Lawrence worked as a Mechanic for US Air, retiring after over 39 years of service. He was a member of Aurora Eagles, Aurora Moose, Milan American Legion and Addyston Ohio VFW. He loved to tell jokes, and he never met a stranger. He liked westerns, watching the news, grilling out,camping at Camp Shore. Lawrence loved to travel, his favorite spot was Colorado. The thing he enjoyed most besides spending time with family, was playing Santa Claus. He played Santa at the Moose and Eagles, as well as, other venues. He loved the smiles he produced on all of the children’s faces and the adults too. Lawrence was proud of his family and he will be sadly missed by family and friends.Surviving are his wife, Evelyn Clark of Lawrenceburg, IN., children, Sam (Mary) Clark of Amelia, OH, Rick (Mary) Clark of Dillsboro, IN, Kevin (Marilyn) Clark of Batesville, IN, and Michael S. Clark of Lawrenceburg, IN, brother, LeRoy Clark, half sisters, Barb(Gene) Tyler & Jeannie (Rob) Barker, half brothers, Lawrence “Toby” Clark, III, grandchildren; Tony Clark, Andrea Delmar (Luke Sulllivan), Jeremy Clark( Alena Atamaniuk), Phillip Clark, Erin Clark, great grandchildren.; Caleb Delmar, Morgan Delmar, Blake Jackson, Riley Sullivan, Arhip Atamaniuk and Corbin Clark.Lawrence was preceded in death by his parents, twin daughters, Janet & Jeanett Clark, sister, Joyce Hutchinson and grandson, Jason Clark.Friends will be received Tuesday, December 13, 2016 from 4:00 -8:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at 11:00 am, Wednesday at the funeral home with Rev. Karen Reynolds officiating.Interment will follow in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana. Military graveside services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions may be made to the Moose Heart Charities. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more