Month: June 2021

Shontayne Hape signs for London Irish

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BATH, UNITED KINGDOM – JANUARY 15: Shontayne Hape of Bath in action during the Heineken Cup Pool Four match between Bath and Aironi Rugby at the Recreation Ground on January 15, 2011 in Bath, England. (Photo by Harry Engels/Getty Images) TAGS: Bath RugbyLondon Irish London Irish head coach Toby Booth said: “Shontayne is a player I have been very impressed with since his move to rugby union. He is physically very intimidating and his ability to offload out of the tackle will trouble any defence. We have a lot of young talent coming through the club and the experience that Shontayne brings will also help them to develop further.”center_img After spending six seasons in rugby league playing for the Bradford Bulls and representing New Zealand Kiwis on the international stage, gaining 14 caps, Shontayne moved across to Bath in 2008 signing a three year contract to play at the Recreation Ground. He made his international debut for England in last year’s summer tour to Australasia qualifying for the red rose through residency.Shontayne will join London Irish for the 2011/12 season. Shontayne Hape to join the ExilesLONDON IRISH have secured the signing of Bath and England centre Shontayne Hape on a two year deal from Bath Rugby.Shontayne currently features in Martin Johnson’s England squad for the 2011 Six Nations and made his seventh and eighth consecutive test starts against Wales and Italy in the first two rounds of the tournament. He appeared in all of last November’s autumn internationals for England at Twickenham, including an impressive performance against his native New Zealand.The dual international is a strong and powerful runner with the ability to break the defensive line and offload out of the tackle making him a potent attacking weapon. During his time at Bath he made 58 appearances scoring six tries.last_img read more

The scrum: IRB introduce key changes to the set-piece

first_img“These tests weren’t done in a muddy field in the middle of Gloucestershire. Why weren’t any current players asked? There does not seem to have been a proper cross-section of people discussing these changes. We will see how it goes but change comes down to the players.”Alan Dymock is working on a study of the need for change and the options available to the lawmakers in regards to the scrum on behalf of Rugby World. More to come later this year LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Free-for-all: The scrum has been heavily criticised from all quarters, so the IRB has felt it necessary to actIN A step to answer and assuage the increasingly vocal critics of the scrum the IRB yesterday took a major step to change the set-piece.The Scrum Steering Group, headed by former international flanker John Jeffrey and aided by the likes of former prop David Barnes, All Blacks forwards coach Mike Cron and referee chief Joel Jutge amongst others, set forth a plan to trial a new engagement protocol for next season in both the northern and southern hemisphere.The trial means that there will be a change of commands, with the referee calling ‘crouch, bind, set’.Props must not grip the opponent’s chest, arm, sleeve or collar, but with the ‘bind’ call use their outside arm to pre-grip their opposite number from a pre-ordained distance. There will be a pause, the referee will then call ‘set’ when the front rows are ready. The front rows may then engage.With this directive the sanction for any infringement during these calls will be a free kick. The sanction for “charging” from a greater distance will be a penalty. It has also been reiterated by the IRB that these changes will be coupled with stricter policing by officials of the put-in at scrum time, and the timing of the push.Backing: IRB Chairman Bernard LapassetPlayer safety is the paramount point, according to the IRB, with these changes being recommended after Bath University concluded their Scrum Forces Project which looked at the impact of hits in the current scrum format and compared it to the ‘crouch, bind, set’ protocols, paying particular attention to the force of hit (which currently peeks at 16500 newtons) and the predicted regularity of collapses. This study was completed against machines and then in live sessions at Bath University and as far afield as Aberdeen with club players, while also being trialed in the southern hemisphere’s Pacific Rugby Cup. According to the study, the ‘bind’ ensures a more stable platform, with 25% less impact and fewer collapses.Talking to Rugby World through the IRB, SSG member and IRB Chief Medical Officer Dr Martin Raftery said:”Reducing the compression forces at the scrum by some 25 percent is likely to have a positive impact on injury rates at the top level of the Game where forces are highest. LEICESTER, ENGLAND – MAY 12: George Chuter of Leicester throws the ball in the warm up during the Aviva Premiership semi final match between Leicester Tigers and Saracens at Welford Road on May 12, 2012 in Leicester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) “This trial has been aimed at enhancing the long-term welfare of our players by mitigating the possible degenerative symptoms that can occur post-career. It is a logical and proactive step in improving player welfare.”The calls for change have come from several quarters, citing player safety, a departure from the laws of the game and also the loss of entertainment value and appeal to younger audiences.IRB Chairman Bernard Lapasset said: “The scrum is a fundamental and dynamic part of our game. It is important that we continue to promote the best possible player welfare standards and this trial process is about putting players first and delivering a reduction of the forces on engagement at elite level, which could have significant positive effects on long-term player welfare.”The trial will be global and in collaboration with member unions with a game-wide educational process involving coach and match official workshops will be rolled out ahead of the trial, according to the IRB. It is also said that “five perspective Law changes [are] currently being trialled and the trial change to television match official protocols will be considered by IRB Council at its annual meeting in 2014” so that any law changes are brought in before Rugby World Cup 2015.Take aim: George Chuter sees no quick fix in the scrumJudgement of this trial will be reserved for a year from now, but as Leicester Tigers and former England hooker George Chuter told Rugby World last month: “Change or any regression back to a pushing contest must be gradual. There is no simple fix and my pet hate is when people say that straight feed will fix everything. You just get a guy on one leg getting bent over backwards.last_img read more

Six Nations: Five things we learnt – Scotland

first_imgWith discipline the major issue of the tournament so far, Scotland fixed that to great effect, only giving away eight penalties to England’s ten.Positional kicking and concentration were issues early on, so they fixed those and prospered.Then after half time, Scotland inexplicably failed to retain momentum having worked so hard to wrestle it from England’s grasp. The old failings re-appeared: poor kicking, and playing too much rugby in the wrong areas of the pitch. As a result they were all but passengers in the second half, with nowhere near enough possession and poor use of territory preventing them from coming close to a first win at Twickenham since 1983, even if the scoreline was closer than many had feared.Committment: Scotland must continue with an agressive defence to unsettle sides (Pic Action Images)Quick ball, offloading, aggressive defenceScotland must do all of the above, more often. When we do it, we score tries. When we kick aimlessly, or sit off the attack, or ball slows to the opposition’s preferred pace – we do not. And then we lose. It really is that simple. Yes, teams will figure out the Plan A and no doubt find ways to impede it, but forgetting to try Plan A is not the same as Plan A not working.Were there positives? Leading at half-time, there was no shame for Scotland at Twickenham, but yet again they pulled up short in what is turning out to be a frustrating campaign LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS To a point. The set piece is reliable if not spectacular, and the players mentioned above along with Tommy Seymour and Bennett will form the core of the team for the next few years. You only hope they are paying close attention in defeat, and the media don’t have to keep writing about the same lessons over, and over again…At the moment it sure feels like it. Thank goodness for…Jonny Gray, Blair Cowan and most importantly Stuart Hogg. These three players continue to perform well, even as those around them fluctuate wildly from the sublime to ridiculous. There are many that called for the return of in-form John Barclay but against England, but Cowan kept a clean disciplinary sheet and was once again a constant threat at the breakdown and a valuable ball carrier. His place is (ironically for Barclay fans) one of the few that is safe. Hogg’s scrambling tackles in the opening spell – when England were running riot – kept Scotland in the game. The cricket score we had feared never materialised and Scotland can take some pride in the way they rallied to lead at half-time.Dave Denton’s also worth a mention for a muscular ball carrying effort and I suspect he’ll start again next week.Shining light: Stuart Hogg has continued to excel in a losing Scotland side (Pic Inpho)Alex Dunbar was a big lossMatt Scott will have noted the growing presence of Mark Bennett in the centre while he’s been out injured, and it must have seemed like a long road back to dislodge the incumbent Glasgow pairing. Then fate intervened with an unfortunate ACL injury to Dunbar just before the Scotland team were set to travel, and Scott got a the chance to make his mark.Unfortunately, Scott was a little too keen to show he’s worth his place by attempting two show stopping interceptions in the first ten minutes, one of which created a gaping space for Joseph to run into for England’s first try. Scott recovered for some nice play during Scotland’s golden 20 minutes in the first half, then retired at half time with a dead leg.We need a more mature response if he recovers to face Ireland. If you need at least four test level centres in your squad for a big tournament, we’re down to one and a half at the moment and Matt needs his extra fifty per cent back to give us hope.Increasing influence: Mark Bennett has had an assured Six Nations to dateYou fix one thing, and something else breakslast_img read more

2018 Rugby Championship Referees Announced

first_imgWith the Rugby Championship around the corner, we take a look at the referees selected to officiate during the tournament. High-Profile: Wayne Barnes will officiate during the tournament (Getty Images) New Zealand v South AfricaWestpac Stadium, Wellington, New Zealand (15 Sep 2018) Aussie: Angus Gardner will officiate SA vs NZ on the 6th of October (Getty Images) Referee – Nigel Owens (Wales)Assistants – Pascal Gauzere (France), Nic Berry (Australia)TMO – Rowan Kitt (England)Australia v ArgentinaCbus Super Stadium, Gold Coast, Australia (15 Sep 2018)Referee – John Lacey (Ireland)Assistants – Glen Jackson (New Zealand), Paul Williams (New Zealand)TMO – Glenn Newman (New Zealand)South Africa v AustraliaNelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth, South Africa (29 Sep 2018)Referee – Jérôme Garcès (France)Assistants – Wayne Barnes (England), Matthew Carley (England)TMO – Graham Hughes (England)Argentina v New ZealandEstadio Velez Sarsfield, Buenos Aires, Argentina (29 Sep 2018)Referee – Mathieu Raynal (France)Assistants – Jaco Peyper (South Africa), Marius van der Westhuizen (South Africa)TMO – David Grashoff (England)South Africa v New ZealandLoftus Versfeld, Pretoria, South Africa (6 Oct 2018)Referee – Angus Gardner (Australia)Assistants – Jérôme Garcès (France), Matthew Carley (England)TMO – Graham Hughes (England)Argentina v AustraliaEstadio Padre Ernesto Martearena, Salta, Argentina (6 Oct 2018)Referee – Jaco Peyper (South Africa)Assistants – Mathieu Raynal (France), Marius van der Westhuizen (South Africa)TMO – David Grashoff (England)Australia v New ZealandTBC, Japan (27 Oct 2018)Referee – Romain Poite (France)Assistants – Marius van der Westhuizen (South Africa), Rasta Rasivhenge (South Africa)TMO – Marius Jonker (South Africa)Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 2018 Rugby Championship Referees AnnouncedThe 2018 Rugby Championship referees have been announced with some of the finest officials in the world taking control of some of the most exciting players in the world.High-profile referees like Wayne Barnes, Nigel Owens, and Angus Gardner will officiate throughout the tournament, looking to ensure that all sides adhere to the rules of the game.Below we have given a list of all the matches along with their match officials and TMO’s. Australia v New ZealandANZ Stadium, Sydney, Australia (18 Aug 2018)Referee – Jaco Peyper (South Africa)Assistants – Wayne Barnes (England), Luke Pearce (England)TMO – Marius Jonker (South Africa)South Africa v ArgentinaKing’s Park, Durban, South Africa (18 Aug 2018)Referee – Ben O’Keeffe (New Zelaand)Assistants – Angus Gardner (Australia), Andrew Brace (Ireland)TMO – Simon McDowell (Ireland)New Zealand v AustraliaEden Park, Auckland, New Zealand (25 Aug 2018)Referee – Wayne Barnes (England)Assistants – Jaco Peyper (South Africa), Luke Pearce (England)TMO – Marius Jonker (South Africa)Argentina v South AfricaEstadio Malvinas Argentinas, Mendoza, Argentina (25 Aug 2018)Referee – Angus Gardner (Australia)Assistants – Ben O’Keeffe (New Zealand), Andrew Brace (Ireland)TMO – Simon McDowell (Ireland)New Zealand v ArgentinaTrafalgar Park, Nelson, New Zealand (8 Sep 2018)Referee – Pascal Gauzere (France)Assistants – Nigel Owens (Wales), Nic Berry (Australia)TMO – Rowan Kitt (England)Australia v South AfricaSuncorp Stadium, Brisbane, Australia (8 Sep 2018)Referee – Glen Jackson (New Zealand)Assistants – John Lacey (Ireland), Paul Williams (New Zealand)TMO – Glenn Newman (New Zealand)last_img read more

Joe Launchbury: How to spoil opposition lineout ball

first_img The Northampton Saints flanker explains how to stop… The Wasps and England lock offers tips on disrupting your opponents’ set-piece Full stretch: Joe Launchbury challenges at a Fiji lineout (Getty Images) Expand “After that, it’s about the cues I’m picking up. I’ll always go with the first movement of the opposition before the ball is thrown.“Invariably that movement is heading roughly towards where the ball’s going to go, and if they dummy and go over me I’ll watch it. So if you run with that first movement and the hooker lets go of the ball, you are roughly in the right spot.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… Joe Launchbury: How to spoil opposition lineout ball England lock Joe Launchbury made his Test debut against Fiji in 2012 and has gone on to win more than 60 caps and play in two World Cups.Here he explains how to disrupt opposition lineout ball…Numbers game“Coming into the lineout, the most basic thing is to pick up the numbers early. Then pick up the formation they’re in. From the team they picked before the game, you’ll get a good understanding of their shape.“Most sides operate with a primary jumping back-row, so put less attention on the other back-rows.”Eye on nine“If you pay more attention to the second-rows and jumping back-row, then you look at the ‘plus one’ – where the nine stands.“If it’s a forward at nine it’s likely they’re going to drive, so you must talk about whether we have to get up and compete for the ball or we must stop the drive.”First act Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout Collapse Expand The Wales lock gives his tips for getting… Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8 Jamie Gibson: How to defend a maul Cory Hill: How to catch in a lineout Sarah Hunter: How to control the ball at No 8 Jamie Gibson: How to defend a maul The England Women’s captain gives her tips for… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS At your fingertips“It’s rare to get a double-handed steal in the lineout. A little fingertip tap might be enough and just putting pressure on them by jumping in front helps.“You cannot risk going across or taking the ball out their hands now. If they catch it but it’s not clean, good job. Get some disruption and we might be able to pressure their nine.”This article originally appeared in the December 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine. last_img read more

Sally Johnson may stand for House of Deputies vice president

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 25, 2012 Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Sally Johnson[Episcopal News Service] Sally Johnson, a seven-time General Convention deputy from the Diocese of Minnesota, said June 24 that she will stand for election as vice president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies if a clergy person is elected president of that house.“I have been encouraged to seek the vice president’s office and believe that I am being called not because I have the answers to the question of how we should change, but because I understand how the Episcopal Church is currently put together; what the rules are; and how decisions are made,” Johnson said in announcing her intentions on her Facebook page. “I understand how to make change work, how to take a vision and making it a functioning reality. I have a proven track record of assisting people in making organizational and structural change in the Church.”“From my work in helping the Church strengthen its misconduct, Title IV, and background screening protocols, I know what it feels like and what it takes to challenge the church’s usual way of doing business. I know, too, the good that can come from persevering in campaigns to change an entrenched culture.”Johnson, an attorney, is vice president of risk management and education with the Church Pension Group. She oversees the creation of resources to help leaders in congregations and dioceses prevent and deal with risks to their employees, members and visitors, as well as to their buildings.Johnson, 59, led the creation of CPG’s Safeguarding training series meant to teach church employees how to prevent child sexual abuse and adult sexual exploitation and harassment. Johnson also consults with congregation leaders and others to respond to reports of misconduct in the church.She plans to retire from CPG by the end of the year, according to a June 22 posting on her Facebook page.Johnson noted in her announcement that she has trained more than 500 people in safe church programs, and trained and worked with chancellors, canons to the ordinary, diocesan staff, other church leaders and seminarians in misconduct prevention and response, ecclesiastical discipline under Title IV, as well as in church polity, governance and canons.“Perhaps most importantly as we seek to work together to change our church, I have trained and/or worked with nearly all of the bishops as a regular presenter at the College for Bishops and at House of Bishops meetings, and as an advisor on misconduct, discipline and canons,” Johnson said. “I have good working relationships with many bishops across the geographic and political spectrum, and as vice president, I would be eager to continue collegial work with them for the benefit of the entire church.”Johnson began working for Church Insurance Co. in January 1998 and moved from there to CPG four years later. Prior to joining CPG, Johnson practiced law in Minneapolis for 19 years. She worked with personal injury and product liability cases, and was an advisor for religious and nonprofit organizations on a variety of matters.She lives in Minneapolis with Kay Kramer, her partner of 32 years.Johnson has been a General Convention deputy since 1994 and currently is the first lay deputy of the Minnesota deputation. Johnson has served as chancellor of the Diocese of Minnesota and currently is chancellor to House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson.Anderson has said she would not ask General Convention, which meets July 5-12 in Indianapolis, to elect her to a third and final term as president. Thus, an election for her successor will be held during this meeting of convention with nominations opening July 9, a “meet the nominees” reception that evening and the election on the 10th.Thus far, the Rev. Gay Jennings and Martha Bedell Alexander have announced they intend to stand for election as president.Canon I.1.1(b) requires that the president and vice president be of different orders.Nominations for House of Deputies vice president will open July 10 and that election will take place the next day, July 11.The office of vice president has been vacant since Feb. 15, 2010, when Diocese of Minnesota Bishop Brian Prior, who had been vice president, was ordained bishop.At the organizing session of the House of Deputies on July 5, the house will elect a vice president to serve at the 77th convention. The Very Rev. Scott Kirby, retired dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and a deputy from that diocese, has agreed to be nominated to serve as vice president. Other persons may also be nominated from the floor. If Kirby is elected, he has indicated that he will not stand for election for any office for the next triennium.The president-elect and vice president-elect take office at the adjournment of the regular meeting of the House of Deputies at which they are elected and continue in office until the adjournment of the following regular meeting of the General Convention. They are both eligible to stand for election for three three-year terms in each office.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release General Convention 2012, Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group General Convention, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 President of the House of Deputies Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Sally Johnson may stand for House of Deputies vice president Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Convención General Sermón predicadopor Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Rector Washington, DC General Convention, Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Convención General Sermón predicadopor Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention 2012, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] El siguiente sermón fue presentado hoy en la 77a Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal, que se reúne en Indianápolis, Indiana, hasta el 12 de julio.REUNIÓN DE LA UTO Y FESTIVAL EUCARISTICODomingo, 8 de julioLa Reverendísima Katharine Jefferts SchoriObispa Presidente y PrimadoIglesia Episcopal¡Mortales! ¡Levántense y escuchen! Dios les está enviando a una casa rebelde, llena de gente insolente y terca. Su trabajo consiste en ir a decirles: “Escuchen, este es el pacto, del Gran Hombre en sí mismo”. Y si no escuchan, por lo menos sabrán que han conocido a un profeta.Garrison Keillor es famoso por señalar que nadie quiere un profeta en una fiesta de cumpleaños. Nuestra imagen de los profetas es algo así como la de los dragones que respiran fuego o Nunzilla, pero un profeta no es más que alguien enviado a hablar en nombre de Dios, para decir las cosas como son. A veces los profetas dicen palabras de consuelo y fortaleza, la clase de palabras que el salmista está pidiendo: misericordia y socorro. Y a veces, el profeta dice palabras que son más difíciles de escuchar, nos recuerda que se supone que debemos amar a Dios con todo lo que somos y tenemos y a nuestro prójimo como a nosotros mismos. El recordatorio generalmente nos llega porque los oyentes de los profetas no han estado a la altura de esa expectativa. Lo que Jesús dijo en la sinagoga parece haber sido ese tipo de palabra retadora.Los amigos y vecinos de Jesús, obviamente, no esperan oír nada profético del carpintero ordinario de la misma calle o del hermano de sus amigos. Él nunca antes se puso de pie en la sinagoga y dijo algo particularmente retador, ¿quién se cree que es? Marcos no nos dice lo que Jesús lee o dice. Lucas dice que es parte de un pasaje de Isaías que dice así, “el Espíritu me ha ungido para dar la buena nueva a los pobres, la liberación a los cautivos, vista a los ciegos, justicia a los oprimidos, y para anunciar el año del Señor”. Y sus amigos y vecinos se sienten ofendidos.Es ofensivo – y confrontador y desafiante – el saber que a pesar de que creemos que nos hemos estamos llevando bien, no hemos dado la talla. Sin embargo, hasta que podamos escuchar el abismo que hay entre lo que es y lo que deberíamos ser, no tenemos ninguna esperanza de cambiar.A veces los profetas que anuncian tales noticias aparecen de una manera muy normal y tranquila, y eso puede ser lo que molestó tanto la gente de la ciudad natal de Jesús. Es más difícil hacer caso omiso de alguien a quien respetamos y conocemos muy bien.Oí una invitación profética como esa hace un par de meses. Se me pidió que participara en una reunión de líderes cristianos y políticos para tener en cuenta el estado del discurso público en Estados Unidos, y la invitación hacía referencia a una de nuestras más conocidas figuras políticas, el senador Jack Danforth. La reunión estaba programada para celebrarse en Washington, DC, justo antes de que yo tuviera que partir para ir a la Convención General. Una conversación acerca de la civilidad parecía una tarea muy apropiada, pero como el día se acercaba, yo estaba mucho más centrada en los asuntos de esta reunión. Estuve a punto de cancelar el viaje, más de una vez. Pero fui, y oí un coro de voces proféticas: clero y religiosos católico romanos, predicadores bautistas del Sur, miembros del Congreso de ambos partidos, obispos luteranos y metodistas, ministros evangélicos de la Asamblea de Dios y de tradiciones pentecostales. Cada uno de nosotros estaba allí para lamentar la pérdida de respeto hacia los oponentes políticos y la incapacidad de crear una causa común por el bien mayor. No leímos el Salmo de hoy, pero sin duda era apropiado para la conversación:Ten piedad de nosotros, Señor, ten piedad, hemos tenido más que suficiente desprecio. ¡Por favor! ¡Que no haya más ridículo por parte del arrogante, o abuso por parte de un pueblo orgulloso y engreído!Comenzamos nuestro encuentro hablando de la esperanza de los estadounidenses ante el desprecio y la arrogancia que escuchan en el Congreso y en otros políticos, pero pronto empezamos a hablar del abuso y ridículo que escuchamos de nuestros hermanos y hermanas en Cristo. Mantuvimos unas conversaciones animadas, y terminamos por aceptar orar con y por un compañero, comenzamos a dar forma a una declaración común, y desarrollamos una lista de acciones positivas que podríamos tener para el fomento de un discurso más civil y efectivo, tanto en la política y como en nuestras vidas religiosas. Las palabras importan profundamente, y como cristianos afirmamos eso cada vez que nos reunimos para dar gracias por el Verbo encarnado en medio nuestro.Los profetas hablan y actúan en nombre de Dios, con palabras habladas y encarnadas de fortaleza, esperanza y desafío. El ministerio profético se nos presenta de muchas formas. Consideren la obra agradecida de la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias [UTO] y de las Mujeres de la Iglesia Episcopal [ECW], ayudando en una posibilidad creativa aquí y en todo el mundo. La reunión trienal comienza con una bendición y distribución de cruces, y las manos que se extienden para recibirlas son un sacramento de bendición. Cuando Jesús pone en las manos y cura a algunos, incluso en un lugar que no creía que tenía mucho que ofrecer, está haciendo algo profética. El trabajo que las manos de mujeres de la iglesia Episcopal hacen en la recolección y en los ministerios de bendición en todo el mundo es también profético.¿Qué pasa con las manos de ustedes? Ellas también son instrumentos de sanación, reconciliación, y re-creación, ¡veamos esas manos! Eso es un sacramento de la misión de Dios. ¿Cómo va usted a usar esas manos en una casa insolente y rebelde? Estas manos pueden ser instrumentos de advertencia, o de consuelo y fortaleza para los indecisos. Las manos pueden ser instrumentos de comunicación profética, un regalo que no todos hemos aprendido.Cuando Jesús se va a otros pueblos para enseñar, está usando las palabras y las manos de una manera profética, anunciando el reino de Dios ya cercano, la curación, la alimentación y llamando a la gente a reunirse en comunidad. Envía a sus amigos a hacer las mismas cosas:a anunciar la buena noticia del reino de Diosa enseñar a los nuevos creyentesa sanar al heridoa combatir la injusticiay a cuidar del jardín que compartimos con todo el resto de la creación.Esas cinco marcas de la misión son la tarea y la marca de los profetas, de todos los amigos de Jesús y sus socios. Todo el comentario acerca del equipo de viaje es un recordatorio para que sea sencillo, vamos como emisarios de la palabra encarnada, para ser un don y hablar y actuar a favor del sueño de Dios.Por lo tanto: ¡mortales, profetas, levántense! Dios les está enviando a una casa rebelde, llena de gente insolente y terca. Algunos de ellos, como el profeta Pogo, dicen: “Somos nosotros” .  Su trabajo es ir y decir: “Escuchen, este es el pacto, Dios tiene en mente un mundo mejor, y les necesitamos para logarlo”. Y una vez que hayan comenzado la conversación acerca de las buenas noticias, sigan mostrando y diciendo al mundo cómo es el sueño de Dios.Con el tiempo, la gente de todo el mundo se dará cuenta que han conocido a un profeta, y a toda una comunidad de profetas. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jul 8, 2012 Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

One year after flooding, rebuilding efforts continue in Vermont

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC One year after flooding, rebuilding efforts continue in Vermont Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Donahue family signals thanks to St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, FEMA and their landlord for making the necessary replacements and repairs at the home they rent in Sharon, Vermont, after Hurricane Irene. Photo/Dick Davis[Episcopal News Service] A year ago, members of Episcopal congregations in the Diocese of Vermont were ferrying peanut butter, casseroles, space heaters and cleaning supplies via cars and trucks along the state’s highways in what was dubbed the “Freeway Relay” to aid Hurricane Irene flood victims.Today, the relay has ended, but the work to help people rebuild their lives and homes continues.“People are still reeling,” said Ann Cooper, who is coordinating Episcopal Relief & Development grants in the diocese. “There are people who fall between the cracks, and they’re still between them. And for all the people we help, which isn’t enough, we know that there are at least an equal number of people out there that need help. Part of the problem is finding them, and the other problem is funding them.”Relief agencies across the state “report that they are still getting new applications every day,” said the Rev. E. Angela Emerson, diocesan minister for stewardship development. “There’s still a lot of disconnection and relocation and resettling that’s going on.”An e-mail soon after the hurricane to Emerson’s office at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in White River Junction from a church needing food for its frozen-food distribution program helped launch the Freeway Relay. St. Paul’s became a focal point for the relay along Interstate 91, which runs south from the northeast corner of Vermont. Another relay route ran on the state’s western side. By early October 2011, virtually all of the diocese’s 48 congregations had participated in some way, collecting, donating or ferrying food and supplies to where they were needed, Canon to the Ordinary Lynn Bates said last fall.While that relief effort ran its course, the need continues.“The needs are so individualized that you can’t really mobilize things en masse,” Emerson said. “It really has to be tailored to the individual.”“People are still rebuilding,” she said. Some families are trying to complete construction and return home, while others haven’t begun rebuilding yet. Some need fuel assistance, others siding for their homes, still others skilled labor to tackle the renovations. The challenge is keeping in touch with people – most of whom have returned to work – and matching resources to individual needs, Emerson said.The diocese has made grants large and small, from paying shipping costs for donated blankets and delivery charges for hay to two farms to aiding the rebuilding of a flood wall and helping to fund debris removal and debt recovery for a small town. Initially, the diocese received $20,000 to $25,000 in grants from various sources plus a $20,000 Episcopal Relief & Development grant, Cooper said. Additional grants from the church agency were made for $50,000 last year and $150,000 in 2012, with probably $55,000 of that yet unspent, she said.“Many of our grants have gone to people who have fallen between the cracks, who are not eligible for FEMA funding or have been turned down, who discovered damage too late to apply for aid, small businesses, people who have flown beneath the radar,” she said. “In addition, we have tried to help communities recover and prepare for the future, are working with children affected by the flood, have helped build and/or restore community and school gardens throughout the state, etc.”Bill Sturtavent’s trailer in Sharon, Vermont, was destroyed by Hurricane Irene flooding. Photo/Dick DavisThe diocese also has been building relationships.“In addition to the money we’ve given out, what excites me and inspires me is the working relationship we’ve been able to establish with government agencies – local government and state government – and with long-term recovery committees and with other churches,” Cooper said. One grant, for example, went toward a plan to help restore a streambed to mitigate future flooding and to involve other Episcopal churches, denominations, communities and service groups in the project.“Part of my job has been to talk outreach committees or whole parishes to try to bring home the continuing serious needs for recovery work,” she said. “The streambed project came out of one such talk.”Back at White River Junction, the relief work distributing supplies that was based at St. Paul’s recently ended. A new ecumenical ministry called the After Irene Ministry – or AIM – of the Upper Valley, is forming in its place, involving other Episcopal and Congregational churches.“There are many, many needs out there, and we’re trying to sort that out,” said Holly Hall, a St. Paul’s member who visits homes to identify and record flood victims’ needs and help them manage their stress.Volunteers have continued delivering water to families who still have none and firewood to replace wood too loaded with post-flooding silt to burn. But as much as such physical needs continue, emotional needs are surfacing.“Truthfully, the pain is probably more severe now than it was eight months ago because of the reality of what’s been lost and having to still adjust,” Hall said. She’s visited a diabetic man weekly, for example. “When he saw me on Monday was the first time I really heard his anger and rage, because he was really getting in touch with it.”Over the phone, Hall choked up discussing the families she sees. Actually visiting is easier, she said. “Thinking about it is harder. What amazes me is the number of people that feel that it’s over. When you’re at the grassroots and you just simply visit once a week and you really can witness their high stress, it’s not over.”AIM is working to help rebuild community as well as aid individual families. Members are planning a Halloween service, for example, for Oct. 28 in the building of a former Congregational church in West Hartford.AIM now works with 58 clients, said Dick Davis, another St. Paul’s member. Rebuilding is a long-term issue for the area, not only in terms of infrastructure, but also in people’s lives, he said. “I think everyone from White River Junction up to Sharon, which is 20 miles, has probably spent every penny that they had in savings, and many of these people are retired. How do you replace that? So this has got some long-term rebuilding consequences.  … You could write a book on the individual stories.”Dream Builders volunteers from churches and a synagogue in Maryland erect a wall in a new home for the Hart family. Photo/Dick DavisThe work is “draining and exhilarating,” Emerson said, noting “the enormous amount of energy it takes to try and keep your own balance and take care of yourself.”“This is the kind of work that really changes lives,” she said. “You come into contact with people who are significantly traumatized, disoriented and in tremendous grief over all that they have lost. … It just evokes tremendous humility and gratitude in yourself, and just to really see the humility and the resiliency on the part of the people who are receiving the help and their desire to give back somehow – it’s just hard to put that into words.”Cooper sees the church’s rebuilding work as “evangelism by example.”“I don’t think you have to walk around with a Bible and a cross,” she said. “I think if you provide an example of Christ’s life in the world, that that’s evangelism.”The small town of Stockbridge was “devastated” by flooding, with some areas inaccessible for two weeks, she recalled. From the beginning, individual churches provided assistance. One day, one of the residents said: “You know, we all want to be Episcopalian!”“It’s evangelism by example,” Cooper said, “and that, to me, is the most effective kind.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Sharon SheridanPosted Oct 19, 2012 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Draft letter on Israel-Palestine is problematic, presiding officers say

first_imgDraft letter on Israel-Palestine is problematic, presiding officers say TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Shane Patrick Connolly says: Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT January 18, 2013 at 9:35 pm I resonate with the words of the Rev. Vicki Gray: “Oh, how this bureaucratic response to a call for justice hurts.” I would wager that the average Episcopalian sitting in our pews is altogether unaware that Christians who live in the Holy Land are Palestinians and that Christians and Muslims suffer together under Israel’s occupation. January 17, 2013 at 9:57 pm We all want peace, and yet, after more than a century of conflict, the struggle between these two related nations remains more intractable than ever. Why?Because each side is entrenched in its own narrative, to the exclusion of the other’s.Its faults notwithstanding, one must admit that Israel has taken some steps since the Oslo Accords toward acknowledging the Palestinian suffering. These steps are reflected in school books, in the media, and through other informational outlets. The Arabs of the West Bank and Gaza, for instance, are now referred to as “Palestinians,” and most Israelis would like to see a Palestinian state emerge. The fact that Israeli voters don’t reflect these wishes has to do with fears of surface-to-air missiles two miles from Ben-Gurion International Airport, and scarred memories of blown-up buses and pizzerias.The Palestinians, unfortunately, have done little to allay Israeli fears. While Palestinians clamor for the removal of onerous checkpoints and barriers, militant attempts to penetrate these barriers and attack Israeli civilians have not ceased at all since the second Intifada. Similarly, school books and speeches, in Arabic, have grown radical, to the point of portraying Israel’s very existence as a crime. Little has been done to acknowledge the Jewish roots in Palestine.The fact is that the Jewish presence in Palestine goes much farther back than most Palestinians, as well as Arabs and Muslims in general, would be willing to admit.Before 1948, Palestine was ruled by a series of empires. Before that Palestine was Judaea—a Jewish country. Jews have lived in Palestine continuously for more than 3,300 years. “Palestine” was the name given to the Jewish homeland in the second century by the Romans, in an attempt to break the Jewish adherence to the land. This was a century after the Jewish temple was destroyed and more than a million Jews were massacred.The Jews stopped fighting the Romans only after they had no more fighting men standing. As Evangelist William Eugene Blackstone put it in 1891, “The Jews never gave up their title to Palestine… They never abandoned the land. They made no treaty, they did not even surrender. They simply succumbed, after the most desperate conflict, to the overwhelming power of the Romans.”The Jews persisted through the centuries under the various empires, after the Arab invasion of 635AD (which they fought alongside the Byzantines), and after the Crusade massacres of the 11th Century, which decimated much of their population. They never stopped returning, and their numbers recovered. In the 19th century, before the Zionist immigration, Jews constituted the largest religious group in Jerusalem.Few Palestinians realize that Jewish customs, religion, prayers, poetry, holidays, and virtually every walk of life, documented for thousands of years—all revolve around Judaea/Palestine/Israel. For thousands of years Jews have been praying for Jerusalem in every prayer, after every meal, in every holiday, at every wedding, in every celebration. The whole Jewish religion is about Jerusalem and the Land of Israel. Western expressions such as “The Promised Land,” and “The Holy Land,” did not pop out of void. They have been part of Western knowledge and tradition dating back to the beginning of Christianity and earlier.After the Crusades, the Jews—including many who have returned over the centuries—lived peacefully with Arabs, often in the very same villages, as in Pki’in, in the Galilee, until the Zionist immigration of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Article 6 of the PLO Charter specifically calls for the acceptance of all Jews present in Palestine prior to the Zionist immigration. These Jews were simply another ethnic group in a region composed of Sunnis, Shiites, Jews, Druz, Greek Orthodox, Catholics, Circassians, Samarians, and more. Some of these groups, like the Druz, Circassians, Samarians, and an increasing number of Christians, are actually loyal to the Jewish State.Incidentally, genetic studies consistently show that Zionist immigrants (a.k.a., Ashkenazi Jews) are closely related to groups that predate the Arab conquest, like the Samarians, who have lived in Palestine for thousands of year.Palestinian denial of these facts may lead to events such as the ones brilliantly depicted in Jonathan Bloomfield’s award-winning book, “Palestine,” in which actual history and predicted events are thinly veiled as fiction.If, as the current Palestinian narrative goes, the Jews are not a people indigenous to Palestine but rather an invading foreign colonialist body, then they must be fought until they are removed from this land. Anything short of that, by any standard, would be injustice.Thus, war and bloodshed will continue until the Palestinians start acknowledging the Jewish narrative, and the fact that Jewish roots in Palestine date back thousands of years, long before the Arab invasion. January 17, 2013 at 10:30 pm The Episcopal Church has no business supporting Hamas, the Palestinians or Hezbolla. They are all terrorist organizations dedicated to the destruction of the U.S. Israel is the sole ally of the U.S. in a turbulent and angry Middle East. The church’s support of the Islamists is misplaced.F. W. Thewalt January 17, 2013 at 8:10 pm A gentle reminder: that the Anglican Bishop is properly referred to as the Bishop in Jerusalem, not “of” Jerusalem, as a courtesy to the Orthodox Bishop Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Nigel A. Renton says: Sam Empacher says: Rector Belleville, IL The Rev. Carol L Huntington says: January 18, 2013 at 11:54 pm Dropping phosphorus bombs on Gaza I think is one of the reasons people are upset. January 20, 2013 at 8:21 pm This letter might be one of the most appalling documents on the Middle East that I’ve ever read. There is no context here and no history. There is no acknowledgement of what people like Hamas mean when they say “Palestine.” Loaded terms like “oppressor” and “apartheid” are indiscriminately tossed around. To the people who signed this thing and to the people who agree with it, Israel is the one and only villain.The Presiding Bishop was right to criticize this poisonous, repulsive letter. Because she knows that if sentiment like this ever became current, Episcopal and Anglican influence in that part of the world would permanently end. Rector Smithfield, NC January 17, 2013 at 10:11 pm I have known Matthew Davies since he first came to work for ENS, and I’ve always found his reporting to be professional and on point. That is why I cannot figure out why he would agree to write a piece that covers reaction to what is nothing more than hearsay. A draft document, no matter who is listed in the properties, is just that, a draft. How did ENS come into possession of the draft? What was the agenda of the person passing it on?It is also obvious that there is an agenda to the article as it follows a linear support of a shared point of view about actions of General Convention and certain other actions of the Presiding Bishop to meet a rather unified end, but the only alternative voice is the “draft letter.” If a draft is your only counterpoint source, how can we know that your quotes will be the final letter or if they will even see the light of day? Was there no human available? The Rev. Vicki Gray? The Rev Naim Ateek? Anyone?It is as if ENS has become the Fox News of 815. Featured Jobs & Calls Alda Morgan says: [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: Click here to view the Episcopal Voices of Conscience letter and its signatories, which was released on Jan. 18.  Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings have said that a draft letter pressing the Executive Council to intervene in the implementation of the Episcopal Church’s policies on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is extremely unhelpful and disregards due legislative processes.“Just as we don’t proof-text Scripture, we don’t proof-text resolutions, and our polity does not provide Executive Council as an appellate process,” Jennings told ENS after seeing a copy of the draft letter. “Each triennium, however, faithful Episcopalians who disagree with a decision of General Convention work to craft new legislation for a new convention, and that process is open to all of us.”“Our work must begin by listening to those who live and work and have their being in the midst of the current conflicts, and equally attend to the conflicts in our own communities,” Jefferts Schori told ENS. “We cannot build a lasting peace by directing or imposing strategies on others.  We can encourage non-violent and transparent methods like those Jesus and his disciple Martin Luther King, Jr. did.”The as-yet unsigned draft letter, titled “A Prophetic Challenge to the Executive Council,” includes a date of Jan. 21 to coincide with the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday and invoking King’s call for justice.The letter, seen by Episcopal News Service, calls on Executive Council to “immediately move forward with our church’s corporate engagement policy so that our financial resources are not being used to support the infrastructure of this suffocating occupation” and to provide a public account of this work.“The church’s corporate-engagement policy with respect to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict remains unchanged since it was adopted in 2005, and its implementation is reflected in at least one shareholder resolution over the course of the past triennium, and in fact was the first major denomination to file a resolution on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict 19 years ago,” said Alexander Baumgarten, director of the church’s Office of Government Relations.“Some Episcopalians had sought a different course for that policy at this past summer’s General Convention, but the House of Bishops declined to pass it after expressing concern that it could set a trajectory toward supporting boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israel,” said Baumgarten, who also noted that the House of Deputies separately rejected boycott, divestment, and sanctions by an overwhelming margin.The Israeli-Palestinian conflict was one of the major issues addressed at the 2012 General Convention, during which the Episcopal Church supported a resolution on positive investment in the Palestinian Territories. Meanwhile, the House of Bishops agreed to postpone indefinitely a conversation on corporate engagement.“I am grateful that The Episcopal Church is currently poised to make such a positive economic investment,” Jefferts Schori told ENS.Resolution B019 affirms positive investment “as a necessary means to create a sound economy and a sustainable infrastructure” in the Palestinian Territories. It also calls on the church to support “the Jewish, Muslim, and Christian study on peace with justice in the Middle East,” and produce an annotated bibliography of resources.Resolution C060, which was tabled, would have called on the church to engage “in corporate social responsibility by more vigorous and public corporate engagement with companies in the church’s investment portfolio that contribute to the infrastructure of the occupation.”One of the main arguments against adopting C060 centered on the fact that the Episcopal Church already has a policy of corporate engagement as recommended in the 2005 report of the Social Responsibility in Investments committee that was endorsed by Executive Council.“General Convention is a great witness to the work of the Holy Spirit,” said Jennings. “Our work at convention is led by the Spirit, and we pray, worship, and sing in the midst of it to remind us that we serve God through our democracy. When we are done and legislation is passed, we stand together.”Baumgarten agreed. “What we saw from the General Convention this past summer was a conscientious decision, after much debate, to call the Episcopal Church to walk a road of intentionality in bringing new people into the fight for a just peace to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and to take the road of reconciliation rather than further division,“ he said. “That decision affirms and builds upon 30 years of resolutions that call the Episcopal Church to support justice for all parties to the conflict.”When called by ENS, the Rev. Canon Brian Grieves of Hawaii, listed in the document’s properties as an author, declined to go on the record until the statement had been released or to share the latest version.The draft letter also calls on the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council to add its voice to other denominations that in October 2012 wrote to Congress “calling for accountability of Israel’s use of foreign aid from our government. The voice of the Episcopal Church is woefully missing in the request our colleagues made to Congress.”Jefferts Schori has said that she was away from the office when the October letter to Congress was being developed, and was not aware of its existence until after it was made public, but has since expressed the belief that the strategy and content reflected in the letter are at odds with the course that the General Convention has asked the Episcopal Church to take.“Signing hortatory statements or partisan letters almost always raises the conflict level, and discourages those on the receiving end of criticism from the kind of openness or vulnerability that is a necessary prerequisite to negotiation,” she said. “Given marked absence of such openness, other methods for motivating participation in negotiations seem most needed right now. That does not mean we should be condoning injustice or aggravated violence by any of the parties. It does mean we have to recognize that progress will not be likely or possible without active insistence that the parties come to the table and stay there.”One of the effects of the letter to Congress has been a suspension of some longstanding dialogue between multiple Christian denominations and Jewish counterparts who support and work collaboratively toward a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.The American Jewish Committee, one of the Jewish groups that withdrew from the dialogue process, was among those who had earlier praised the stances adopted by the Episcopal Church’s General Convention.“The Episcopal Church has demonstrated its commitment to a negotiated resolution of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and a rejection of unhelpful one-sided judgments aimed at Israel that do not advance the cause of peace,” said Rabbi Noam Marans, AJC’s director of interreligious and intergroup relations, who attended General Convention as an invited interreligious guest. “The path toward peace and security for both Palestinians and Israelis is the return without preconditions to direct negotiations for a two-state solution.”Later in October 2012, Jefferts Schori wrote to then presidential candidates President Barack Obama and the Hon. Mitt Romney to use their campaign debate forum “to articulate strong support for a just and peaceful resolution to the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as a clear plan for how you would work to support that goal in the next four years.”Jefferts Schori also joined 35 Christian leaders in signing a January 2013 letter calling on Obama urgently “to redouble his efforts for meaningful progress in the realization of peace between Israelis and Palestinians.”General Convention’s Resolution B019 reaffirms the church’s official policy, based on resolutions passed at its previous General Conventions, committing to a two-state solution in which a secure and universally recognized state of Israel lives alongside a free, viable, and secure state for the Palestinian people, with a shared Jerusalem as the capital of both.The draft letter says that “Israel must be held accountable for allowing an occupation for 45 years that suffocates the dreams of freedom that Palestinians hold every bit as much as African Americans sought on that day when Dr. King told the world that he had a dream. Occupation cannot be justified as a tool of security.”The letter also says that “just as this church stood with South Africa and Namibia during the dark days of apartheid, so we recognize that we need to be standing with our sister and brother Palestinians who have endured an apartheid that Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has described as worse than it was in South Africa.”The SRI committee report from 2005 acknowledged, however, that the situation in Israel and the Palestinian Territories is not the same as the struggle against apartheid in South Africa.“In the case of South Africa, the entire system of apartheid was illegitimate, and no actions short of dismantling it could be countenanced by the world community. The goal was the end of that South African regime,” that report said. “The case of Israel is different. Church policies clearly support Israel’s right to exist, and no companies should be involved, however inadvertently, in any way with organizations engaged in violence against Israelis. Companies can and should operate in Israel proper.”Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem Suheil Dawani has said that investment in the Palestinian Territories and in the ministry of the Jerusalem diocese is what is needed at this time.“As Christians, we are called to be peacemakers, to continue to provide hope where it is dim, to be voices of the voiceless, and to be advocates for a just and durable peace,” Dawani told a July 2011 conference at Lambeth Palace. “We must work together with people of other faiths to encourage the politicians to put politics aside and meet midway, where all people are equal; the marginalized and the powerful, the poor and the wealthy, men and women, children and the elderly, regardless of faith or social status.”Jefferts Schori visited Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza over Christmas, a trip she said “led to encounters with people of good faith from each of the Abrahamic traditions, people seeking peace with justice for all.”“Their voices were ones of moderation, not so easily heard in a world of polarizing headlines,” she told ENS. “To a person, they asked for solidarity and accompaniment by people of faith from other parts of the world. Our task as Episcopalians is to pray and work for peace – in our own countries as well as in the Middle East – through conversation with those who disagree with particular strategies, refraining from demonizing opponents, and building bridges across the chasms dividing our societies.“May your kingdom come, O Lord, and speedily. May our work be fruitful in contributing to peace.”— Matthew Davies is editor/reporter of Episcopal News Service. Comments are closed. Middle East, Rector Tampa, FL Comments (24) Florence Mattar says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rev, Vicki Gray says: Rector Knoxville, TN Anne Lynn says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Br. Tupper, TSSF says: martha knight says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 18, 2013 at 8:54 am Let us work, pray, and study in order to “restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.” Let us spread a spirit of love and harmony. Let us, as Jesus asks of us, manifest a radical commitment to non-violence. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs January 18, 2013 at 1:33 am I really wonder if the Bishop and her supporters have read the Palestine Kairos document and what their response is to that. The 1985 South African Kairos document distinguishes between State, Church and Prophetic Theology, and the Bishop is clearly engaging in what was termed “Church theology”, which is a very deceptive form of theology and spirituality as it pretends to do what Jesus and the prophets would have done but without taking a stand for justice and for the oppressed. The Bishop ought to reflect on the words of Jesus “I have not come to bring peace but a sword” and reject all false notions of peace. I understand her dilemma/strategy to some extent: if the Episcopal Bishop in Jerusalem (who dare not really speak the truth since there is a sword hanging over his head) says that he agrees with the Presiding Bishop, then that becomes her justification. Please Presiding Bishop, understand where the Bishop in Jerusalem is coming from and why would you not for example listen to Archbishop Atallah Hannah or Archbishop Sabbah? They provide other voices similar to the voice that Archbishop Tutu would have provided in South Africa in the 1980s. Israel now not only occupies a member state of the UN, it also is doing everything to nullify the existence of that state and people and surely we must stop covering this up? Please Episcopal Church, take a firm and clear stand. And if necessary, start a movement within the Episcopal Church that will stand against this application of “church theology” – this is what we had to do in South Africa…. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ January 19, 2013 at 11:37 am War and bloodshed need not continue until Palestinians or anyone acknowledge Jewish or any narrative, or how long anyone has been anyplace. January 18, 2013 at 1:42 am Oh, how this carefully parsed bureaucratic response to a call for justice hurts. Its many bloodless, gutless words in the face of manifold and manifest injustices against Palestinians recall the call for “moderation” from Birmingham’s religious establishment to whom Martin responded from that city’s jail. And, from the grave, one can hear Martin’s cry “There is a time when silence is betrayal.” In this statement, that time has come for the Episcopal Church vis-à-vis the Holy Land. It reeks of silence. It reeks of betrayal.It makes one wonder with whom the Presiding Bishop met during her Christmas visit or what she saw. Did she see the Wall? Shuhada Street? Sheikh Jarrah? Silwan? The refugee camps? The illegal settlements? The gun at Bishop Dawani’s head?It makes one wonder where that “midway” between justice and injustice lies and why we seek it.It seeks to refute comparisons with South Africa. But Capetown’s Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, who visited Palestine year before last, said he found the situation there worse than he had experienced in South Africa. And he said it in Jerusalem.It makes one wonder what the Presiding Bishop is afraid of. Does she not have faith that “Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account”?It is time to speak the truth. You will be called names, but you will be blessed.. Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ed McCarthy says: January 26, 2013 at 4:45 pm Alda Morgan makes singular good sense. Israelis and Palestinians, and their respective advocates are trapped within their own narratives. Recently, I attended a series of discussions on “Palestinian Narrative.” Two things became clear: Many, perhaps most, Palestinians are committed to a narrative of resistance to the Israeli occupation. This is understandable, and functional, given their being confronted by what is indeed a severe occupation. It is not useful if a compromise settlement, based on a 2-State solution, is to be reached. Correspondingly, many, again perhaps most, Israelis have a paramount concern with security, which they see as requiring control over a hostile Palestinian population; hence the occupation. This is again functional in the present context, but profoundly dysfunctional if compromise is hoped for. Is there a way out? Perhaps. It entails leadership: By Israelis, Palestinians and our own Government. The tragedy of the draft letter to the Executive Council is that it will do nothing to bring about what is needed, in particular it will do nothing to change American policy toward the conflict, even if the Executive Council should see fit to agree with it, which I doubt. Edwin Arrison says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET January 18, 2013 at 11:50 pm To end the bloodshed, Israel needs to end this brutal occupation. Jews were less than10% of the population of Palestine in the 1940’s but then they started immigrating from Europe after the holocaust. Some Christian Palestinian families have been there from the time of Christ. Some became Muslims during the Ottoman rule to avoid taxation.If people really care about Israel then they need to end the occupation. Christopher Johnson says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest F. William Thewalt says: January 21, 2013 at 4:02 pm Thank you for the letter to Executive Council.In the past 14 months I have been privileged to be sent on a Witness Visit with Sabeel and have spent almost four weeks in Occupied Palestine.In the past several months I have personally and face to face expressed my dismay, disappointment and sadness to both our PB and The Bishop in Jerusalem. He told me “we do not want your interference”. His clergy do not agree with his position. His priests and people have invited us and welcomed us to “come and see” and then to witness to what we saw. We are doing just that.Perhaps the Anglican Church in the Middle East should move to Ramalla like the Quakers, or stay in East Occupied Jersusalem and not have any congregtions like the Methodits so they can do advocacy work….Five Companions of The Society of Companions of the Holy Cross went in November. We have spoken as a group to date to over 140 people in New England.We saw and listened to scores of people and were fed meals in Palestinian homes, caves and tents including people whose homes were under demolition orders by the Israeli government. Several places were being protected by Rabbis for Human Rights and Internationals as well as some direct action nonviolent peacemaking Israeli Jews. An IDF Helicopter flew low over head at a Bedouin tent in the South Hebron Hills at Susya.Settlements are illegal by all understandings of international law.Rabbi Brant Rosen, Vice President Rabbis for Human rights stated recently:“I have personally come to the very painful realization that Jewish nation-statism comes at a very real cost to our Jewish soul – compromising sacred values that teach us that all human beings are created in the image of God, that one law must be extended to all who live on the land, that we must love our neighbors as ourselves.”We met in Jerusalem with American-born Rabbi Arik Ascherman, past president of Rabbis for Human Rights, who has stood in front of bulldozers coming to demolish Palestinian homes, was beaten and imprisoned; He declared that the Israeli government today is “the world’s worst human rights violator.”We visited refugee camps where 18,000 Palestinians were sheltered, but were without drinking water and electricity where Palestinians have lived since 1948 or 1967 with raw sewerage where children played in the dirt rutted streets.There is so much more to tell you…TEC Executive Council should “accept the invitation of Sabeel “to come and see” before denying Palestinian rights for justice and peace. Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA January 18, 2013 at 12:54 am The Episcopal Church has plenty of business supporting the Palestinian people.Comments like those by Mr. Thewalt are the mirror version of why critics of Israeli policies are sometimes called anti-semites. I have never once heard a member of TEC who speaks of justice for the Palestinian people mention that the church should support Hamas or Hezbolla. The Palestinians who you say are a “terrorist organization” are not a homogenous bunch of drones. They are a diverse group of people with a multitude of beliefs, points of view, leanings… they are men and women, mostly young, mostly hard working. In other words, other than the “mostly young” part, they are pretty much people like, well, all other people.Except that their houses and land can be taken away from them without cause. They cannot move freely within the bounds of their own land. They cannot all vote in elections for the people who make the decisions that directly effect their lives. And they cannot travel too far without being looked upon as just another terrorist.Mr. Thewalt, we are talking about our sisters and brothers. We have sisters and brothers in Christ who are Palestinians, Iranians, North Koreans, Malians, Somalis… No one in The Episcopal Church is saying we need to support Hamas, but plenty of Episcopalians are trying to live their lives “respecting the dignity of every human being.” Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA January 18, 2013 at 12:38 pm Thank you Martha. While we all work toward a sustainable peace, the American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem supports the institutions which teach and heal in the Holy Land. Families need jobs today, to educate their children now, to put food on the table tonight. They need our support both through advocacy and through humanitarian aid. A sustainable peace is only possible with both. AFEDJ’s mission is support for quality education based on tolerance and respect for differences and compassionate healthcare for all. http://www.afedj.org Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 18, 2013 at 8:52 am Let us work, pray, and study in order to “restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.” Let us spread a spirit of love and harmony. Let us, as Jesus asks of us, manifest a radical commitment to non-violence. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC January 22, 2013 at 9:55 am correction to my post:Rabbi Brant Rosen, a congregational rabbi in Evanston, Illinois and co-chair of the Jewish Voice for Peace Rabbinical Council,not Rabbis for Human Rights.Sorry.Thanks to Donna Hicks for bring this error to my attention! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Florence Mattar says: Advocacy Peace & Justice, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 V. Tupper Morehead, MD, MDiv, TSSF says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori January 18, 2013 at 4:25 am It is striking that those members of the Episcopal Church who insist on officially demonizing Israel and boycotting it make no effort at all to attack or boycott any non-Jewish country on earth, despite the utter horrors practiced in some of them.Saudi Arabia literally bans churches and the right of Christians to pray in public. It forbids women to drive. It represses a million Shiites. It practices sexual apartheid. And yet the Episcopal Church makes no effort at “corporate engagement” with respect to Saudi Arabia.China occupies Tibet and supresses freedom of religion. Are those who howl about Israel likewise supporting boycotting China, which has done far worse than anything that Israel has done, and received almost no international criticism for it?Nagorno Karabakh is literally occupied, as is Abkhazia. Has the E.C. made an effort to boycott Armenia and Russia?The entire Korean penninsula has the same legal status as the West Bank and Gaza (disputed territories; the legal category is not, in fact, “occupied territories”). Shall corporate engagement be used to address the Korean conflict, which has caused missile launches over Japan and which has led to the starvation of millions of North Koreans?The Syrian regime has massacred 60,000 of its own people – mostly civilians – for the second time since the 1980s, with the enthusiastic aid of Iran and Hezbollah, and this is the regime that sponsored Hamas for so long. There is nothing new about this horror – the regime that is doing it has always been run by mass-murdering psychopaths – but the Episcopal Church has made little effort, through engagement or BDS or any other policy – to do something about the horrors practiced by this regime for decades.Meanwhile, West Bank and Gaza Arabs live longer than Egyptian Arabs, have a higher standard of living than those in Jordan. They are ruled by a corrupt Palestinian Authority that continually steals from its own people and then tries to pin the blame on Israel. And you buy their lies and their manufactured crises and publish them with delight?The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a supporter of Israel.Why is it that so many of you only find a voice to demonize Israel? January 18, 2013 at 2:02 am Mr. Arrison conveniently overlooks the oppression practiced within the Palestinian territories by Hamas against its own people but sees fit to criticize the Middle East’s all-too-rare representative government. He also inaccurately describes Israel as an occupier of a UN member state. Palestine is not, in fact, a UN member state – they were recently granted observer state status yet the nations who approved this new status oddly did not insist that the Palestinians repudiate their commitment to the destruction of the state (and, by extension, people) of Israel. This is inconsistent with the most basic precepts of the UN Charter and with Christian theology, not simply inconsistent with Mr. Arrison’s construction of “church theology”. I have a feeling Jesus would not be pleased with the tactic of blowing up tourist buses, the stoning of homosexuals and rape victims, and other such practices of radical Islamists. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release January 17, 2013 at 7:42 pm Let us remember that the Anglican Bishop of Jerusalem and the Middle East was for over a year denied the papers that allowed him to live in Jerusalem and thus do his job as Bishop. The Chief Rabbi of Israel urged to no avail that his papers be reissued. This is not a situation of equals. When Palestinians and Israelis attempt to peacefully protest they are met with teargas, sound grenades and yes gun fire. If it is not like South Africa, then Archbishop Tutu is wrong for he does see it as the same, no worse than South Africa. In South Africa there were no roads for whites only; there are Jewish only roads in the West Bank.(Built with American tases.) Why should Israel not tell how the dollars we give them for munitions are spent and how the phosphorous shells are used against cities. I have been there, as has the PB (twice!)Jim Tate Prof. Taheri says: James Tate says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Matthew DaviesPosted Jan 17, 2013 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Sean McConnell says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 18, 2013 at 7:38 pm To Sam Empacher’s invocation of Martin’s support of Israel, the Israel of 1967 bears little resemblance to today’s Israel of colonization and apartheid. I, too, support a democratic Israel in which human rights are respected. And, by the way, I and many Episcopalians supported sanctions against South Africa’s apartheid regime. Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Rev. Roy Hayes says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 18, 2013 at 10:00 am The Presiding Bishop’s response saddens me deeper than I can say. I encourage any and all comments to check out The Friends of Jerusalem website, whose commitment to humanitarian aid supports the occupied states as well. As Christians through our baptismal covenant we are called to be reconcilers and bearers of peace, especially as we approach the Week of Christian Unity. President of the House of Deputies, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Sean McConnell says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rev, Vicki Gray says: Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Rev. Carol L Huntington says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET January 18, 2013 at 3:35 pm Sadly, this “conversation” reflects the intractable conflict between the Palestinians and Israel: no one is really listening to anyone else. Few respond to what has been said by previous commenters and when they do, those few simply proclaim another iteration of their point of view and condemn those who disagree with them. If we can’t listen to each other, it is asking a lot of the Israelis and Palestinians to do so. But, as long as this goes on, there will be no resolution, no reconciliation, no peace. Alice Hornbeck says: Israel-Palestine, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

Malawi: Anglican parishes unite to build new church

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Six Anglican Parishes in Malawi have united to help kickstart the construction of a church building for an Anglican outstation in the city of Blantyre in fulfillment of their obligation of “building the House of the God.”Mpemba Anglican Church, an outstation of Manase Parish in Blantyre, Malawi, is the beneficiary of the offering that was collected on an Inter-Parish Way of the Cross procession which the six Anglican Parishes were involved in during this year’s Good Friday.During the handover of the building materials last Sunday, Chairperson of the Organising Committee, Paul Kanthambi said: “We have an obligation to build the House of the Lord, and this is one of the ways of doing it. Our committee thought that the money should not be shared amongst the parishes or used in any other way other than assisting in this church project.”Speaking during the same presentation, Manase Parish Priest, the Revd David Mponda said, “We are witnessing the oneness of the Anglican Church as we gather for the purpose of building God’s house.”Fr. Mponda urged all Anglicans in the country to unite and passionately contribute to church projects regardless of which location the activities were taking place. He also thanked the Organising Committee and those that had materially contributed towards the initiative.For a long time, the Parishes that have participated in the joint Way of the Cross have been sharing the money amongst them. It was only recently that a decision was made not to share the money but instead contribute it toward one cause.Two years ago the money was given towards the medical expenses of a priest who was going abroad for treatment. Last year the collection was given to a different Parish to help repair their priest’s motorcycle.In his sermon Daniel Baluwa from Soche Parish encouraged the congregation to forge ahead with the project, as it is an obligation. He asked both the leaders and the followers to accommodate and understand each other in order for the project to succeed.He charged, “Just as everyone wants his house to be in good shape and of a high, good standard, so should the house of the Lord. Time has come to prepare the House of the Lord just as many others did in the Bible.”According to the Organising Committee Chairperson, the gesture is meant to promote oneness and unity within the Anglican Church in the country. “Anglicans should be assisting in each other’s projects and not be looking up to politicians.”He explained that it’s actually politicians who should be seeking assistance from church through prayers and blessings. The church also plans to build a Priest house and a multipurpose hall at their new site.— With additional reporting from Manase Parish media team. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Bellah ZuluPosted Jun 6, 2014 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Malawi: Anglican parishes unite to build new church Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more