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GAA NEWS: ALL THE RESULTS FROM THE ALL-COUNTY LEAGUE DIVISION ONE

first_imgMichael Murphy scored a penalty as Glenswilly defeated St Eunan’s at O’Donnell Park.GAA NEWS: Four Masters, St Michael’s, Kilcar, Glenswilly, and Ardara all recorded excellent wins in the All-County League Division One.St Eunan’s 1-05 Glenswilly 2-08: Glenswilly exacted some revenge on their neighbours who defeated them in last year’s Donegal SFC final by defeating Maxi Curran’s side at O’Donnell Park. Since losing out to Gaoth Dobhair on the opening day of the season, St Eunan’s have won THREE on the bounce which included a fine away win against Kilcar in Towney.However, Glenswilly inflicted there second defeat of the league campaign with a deserved win earlier this afternoon.Brian Farrelly and Donegal captain Michael Murphy from the penalty spot scored the decisive goals for Gkenswilly while John Haran netted for St Eunan’s.Naomh Conaill 2-05 Kilcar 1-10:  Naomh Conaill got off to a dream start when former Donegal star Leo McLoone netted after just a few minutes gone.Kilcar responded well though and fought their way back into the game and played superbly to go in at the break four ahead.However, Naomh Conaill roared back into the contest when Cathal Ellis netted midway through the second-half to level.Kilcar didn’t buckle despite the blow the concession of the goal was tagged on a number of crucial scores to edge Naomh Conaill by two and secure a crucial win.Malin 2-6 Ardara 3-12: A brace of goals from Ryan Melly and a penalty from CJ Molly ensured John McConnell’s side left Malin with two precious league points after an enthralling battle.A poor start meant Malin trailed Ardara by NINE points at the interval but Liam Bradley’s side fought back and got back into the match when they scored TWO goals in a minute to roar back to life.Paul McLaughlin netted first and then Brendan McLaughlin but then Melly got his second and Molloy dispatched the penalty to ensure Ardara saw off the spirited challenge from Malin.Four Masters 1-07 Gaoth Dobhair 1-06: Four Masters made it two wins from two since new manager Conor McBride was appointed team manager.They earned a super win AWAY to Dungloe last week and followed that up with an excellent win over Gaoth Dobhair at home this afternoon.It was hard fought encounter with nothing between the sides but Four Masters showed great heart and character to get over the line and get another two vital points on the board.St Michael’s 2-12 Dungloe 1-10: (Full Match report below)https://www.donegaldaily.com/2015/04/26/gaa-news-breslin-brace-proves-decisive-as-st-michaels-maintain-winning-run/All-County League Division Two Results:Mac Cumhaills 1-12 Gaeil Fhánada 0-06Naomh Muire 1-11 Glenfin 4-08Termon 2-10 Bundoran 0-11Killybegs 1-03 Naomh Columba 0-05Cloughaneely 0-13 St Naul’s 1-10GAA NEWS: ALL THE RESULTS FROM THE ALL-COUNTY LEAGUE DIVISION ONE was last modified: April 26th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:All-County LeagueDivision OneDivision TwoGAAnewsreportsResultsSportlast_img read more

South African hearing app grows its reach

first_imgDownload the hearZA app and test yourself and two friends’ hearing via your smartphone. The innovation is from a South African team and is used globally.It’s a world first – a smartphone app that lets people test their hearing, says lead researcher Prof De Wet Swanepoel. The app was created by a South African research team and it is being tried all over the world. (Images supplied)Melissa JavanMore than 40,000 hearing tests have been done with a hearing app created by a South African team of researchers. The hearScreen app, provided on a smartphone, is being used in 25 countries worldwide, including Ethiopia, Australia and Guatemala.Because of its success, the South African public can now use the hearing detecting app, hearZA.Speaking on talk radio station CapeTalk, Prof De Wet Swanepoel of the department of speech-language pathology and audiology at the University of Pretoria called the hearZA app “a super computer you have in your pocket”. It helps anyone who is 16 or older to test their hearing.Why the appHearing loss is an invisible epidemic, says Swanepoel, the lead inventor of the app. According to the professor, more than three million South Africans suffer from permanent, disabling hearing loss.“Since it’s invisible, people don’t see it or appreciate the effects of hearing loss. In children it is a major reason for poor speech and language development and of academic failure as a result,” says Swanepoel.“In adults it is associated with significant socio-emotional difficulties, depression and a threefold increased risk of dementia.”Watch the hearScreen researchers talk about the social impact of the app and why people should care about hearing loss:The hearScreen appSwanepoel explains the hearScreen app is provided on a smartphone with a calibrated headphone. This is to allow an accurate hearing test from an Android smartphone according to international standards. “It is not a consumer app but is provided preloaded on specific smartphones with a headphone.”The hearScreen project started in 2013 but its beta launch was on World Hearing Day on 3 March 2016, he says. “(By beta launch) we mean that it is not the final product launch. We have launched to interested parties but based on experiences are still refining it for a final product launch in 2017.”Prof De Wet Swanepoel with five-year-old patient Keziah Maisiri.The app is used in various settings from screenings in schools, early childhood development centres and primary health care clinics, to monitoring TB patients for drug-induced hearing loss and monitoring hearing status in occupational health settings, Swanepoel explains.Outcome of the testing“Based on the geolocation captured for each test and the integrated cloud-based data solution, a text message or email can be sent to the person tested or their parents providing the test outcome and closest hearing health provider in cases of a referral.”The noise check score gives a ratio between 1 and 9. “The test provides a signal to noise ratio for an individual. In essence this is an indicator of someone’s ability to understand speech in the presence of background noise.“The app converts this to a personal hearing score that people can use to monitor their hearing over time.”Prof De Wet Swanepoel says more than 40,000 screen testings have been done worldwide using the hearScreen app.The hearZA appSwanepoel says hearZA is the downloadable Android and iOS application. The app, developed and validated by the University of Pretoria, provides every user with a free hearing test.The two-minute test, sponsored by Sivantos, Oticon and the Ear Institute, requires users to listen to simple digits in noise. Once finished, the user receives their hearing score.hearZA is released by hearScreen, which is supported by The Innovation Hub under its Maxum Business Incubator and mLab Southern Africa.This national hearing test for South Africa provides a free hearing test, says Swanepoel. “It also links patients to their closest hearing health providers based on geolocation with in-app support to make a decision regarding follow-up.”It gives everyone a three test-crediting, Swanepoel told CapeTalk.Every download includes three free test credits, which is one test per person. “After that test credits can be purchased,” says Swanepoel. “A year after the last test, a person is credited with another free test credit to monitor their hearing profile annually.”A Brand South Africa journalist downloaded the hearZA app using an Android cellphone. It was 21 megabytes to download and 0.4 megabytes to do the testing. The journalist got her hearing test results following her test.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

22 Years Later, The Linux And Open Source “Cancer” Is Wonderfully Benign

first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Linus Torvalds in his younger days.Twenty-two years ago Linux was born as a “(free) operating system” that founder Linus Torvalds was quick to downplay as “just a hobby” that wouldn’t “be big and professional.” My, but how times have changed. So much so that Linux now dominates mobile (Android), servers and cloud. No wonder that Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer derided Linux in 2001 as a “cancer” that “attaches itself… to everything it touches.” He was right. At least, as it relates to Linux’s effect on Microsoft.Earlier this week Torvalds celebrated the 22nd birthday of Linux by cheekily calling Linux “just a hobby, even if it’s big and professional” now in a way he never envisaged back in 1991. To help gauge just how far we’ve come since then, I asked Eucalyptus CEO (and fellow Finn) Marten Mickos and Cloudera Chief Strategy Officer Mike Olson to help put open source in perspective. Both men have had an outsized impact on open source, particularly the business of open source, and neither were shy about estimating open source’s impact.On The Maturing Power Of Open SourceOne of the amazing things to have watched over the years is the market’s growing acceptance of this oddball movement, as Mickos highlights:People didn’t know what it was, how it worked, why people did it, how it could produce great software, etc. That’s why the LAMP stack made it onto the front page of Fortune Magazine—it was so new and intriguing. Incumbents fought it. Now they embrace it (or at least pretend to). Those who did open source just did it. Back then it was relatively few projects with relatively few people in them. Today there are probably 100-1000X the number of projects.And while open source was born as an alternative way to develop and distribute software, it has become something more, as Olson intimates:I’ve been pleased to see the ideas behind open source migrate to other important domains, and for APIs to become a kind of currency in the way that source code used to be. I think that open source was really a way to adopt the principles of scientific collaboration—i.e., publish your results, let your peers review and refine your work—to a field that badly needed it. I hope—I believe!—we are doing the same thing now with data and, to some extent, to services via cloud APIs.On Torvalds’ Other Big Innovation… And Getting AlongArguably one of the biggest things to happen to software development in a long, long time is GitHub, the wildly popular code repository. While Torvalds didn’t start GitHub, he did create git, the actual distributed version control system software itself. The creation of git is something that Olson credits with a very significant side effect:It’s been really interesting to watch git emerge. I think of myself as pretty deep in software, but I really wasn’t paying it any attention five years ago. Remember when “fork” was an insult? Git encourages forking. It’s changed the way that open source projects work by fomenting more diversity.While not referencing git, Mickos describes a similar benefit of open source’s peculiar licensing:The purpose of the free and open source license and the governance model is not really to enable like-minded people to collaborate, although that’s a benefit too. It’s about enabling unlike-minded people to collaborate. The beauty of open source is that people who dislike each other can produce code for the same product.In fact, while a genial person, Torvalds exemplifies one of the other characteristics of open source: a penchant for blunt, sometimes harsh, criticism. But this, insists Mickos, is one of the hallmarks of how open source succeeds:When people complain about your open source project, you need to hear them as saying “I would love to love you, but right now I cannot.” If nobody is opposed to your open source product/project, you are not really being popular… If you on a sustaining basis can truly love harsh feedback and if you can truly show enthusiasm and appreciation for contributions of whatever magnitude and type, you can be wonderfully successful in open source.Where Do We Go From Here?For Olson, sitting as he does at the heart of the Big Data movement, open source’s future is wide open:Open source has gone from a weird thing off on the fringes of hackerdom, through “cancer” and “communism,” to absolute mainstream. People now think intelligently about its different attributes—a collaborative development model, a frictionless distribution model, and a powerful way to win platform dominance.Mickos, a key player in the growing cloud market, suggests that while open source developers may have lost a bit of their bite, their impact remains unbounded, if more circumspect:In the early days of open source it seemed that open source developers were true cowboys—out on their own, following their own individual paths, valuing their nearly unlimited freedom. Today many open source developers are happy to be salaried employees of companies that don’t really stand for open source on a corporate level (Google, HP, IBM, Oracle, etc.). There is a voluntary submissiveness today that wasn’t as common before. There is still a lot of unbridled enthusiasm, often bordering on naiveté—with all the amazing upsides and inevitable downsides that this will bring.Mickos goes on to conclude that “Some people will spend any amount of time to save money. Some will spend money to save time. Without money, open source will die.” There’s a whole lot of money in open source these days. Just counting recent venture capital raised by the cloud and data companies amounts to hundreds of millions of dollars.But the soul of open source has not been corrupted. Thanks, in no small degree, to Linus Torvalds and his Quixotic endeavor to change the world with something small that turned into something huge.  Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Why You Love Online Quizzescenter_img Matt Asay Tags:#Big Data#cloud#Linus Torvalds#Linux#Marten Mickos#MIke Olson#Open Source Related Posts last_img read more

Pipeline Reviews Are Not Opportunity Reviews – Episode 141

first_imgPipeline reviews easily descend into opportunity reviews. Opportunity creation precedes opportunity capture, and your pipeline meeting needs to focus on opportunity creation, first and foremost.last_img

Four hockey players killed, 3 injured in Madhya Pradesh road accident

first_imgFour national-level hockey players were killed and three injured when their car crashed into a tree on a highway in Hoshangabad district on Monday morning, said the police. “The players were travelling on the Itarsi road towards Hoshangabad to take part in the Dhyan Chand trophy tournament at 7 a.m.,” said M.N. Chhari, SP. Witnesses told the police the driver of the speeding car had lost control and seconds later crashed into the tree and tumbled to the side near Raisalpur village, he said. “Several locals helped rescue the injured.” The deceased had been identified as Shahnawaz Hussain, Ashish Lal, Aniket Varun and Adarsh Hardua, all between 18 and 22 years. They trained at the Madhya Pradesh Hockey Academy, said the police. The injured had been admitted to the Narmada Apna Hospital in Hoshangabad, where they were being treated free of cost, said Mr. Chhari. “The Chief Minister had announced a compensation of ₹2 lakh for each of the families of the deceased,” he said. Condoling the deaths, Chief Minister Kamal Nath tweeted that he prayed for the speedy recovery of the injured and “instructions had been given to officials for the complete treatment of the injured and every possible help to the families of the deceased”.last_img read more