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Juve still in control – Allegri

first_imgJuventus manager Massimiliano Allegri believes that his side are still in control of the Serie A title race, after losing 1-0 to rivals Napoli on SundayThe reigning champions suffered a shock home defeat to their title rivals at Turin with a late Kalidou Koulibaly winner allowing Napoli to reduce the gap to just one point between the sides in the Serie A standings with just four matches remaining.The victory in Turin has restored Napoli’s title aspirations with fireworks and exuberant fans diving into the fountain at the Piazza Trieste e Trento on the streets of Naples.But Allegri is certain that Juventus, with their slender point lead, still have the advantage.“We are still top of the table, we still have the advantage,” said Allegri, according to Sport360.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“Now we have a rest day, then we have to prepare for what I think really will be the decisive match for our season against Inter Milan (next Saturday).“I think the title race will remain open until May 20. There’s nothing you can take for granted in football.”The Juventus coach admitted that the team’s hectic schedule played a part in their dismal performance: “To the lads I can’t say anything, we play 57 games in a year, the others do not.”The defeat marked Juventus’ second at their Allianz Stadium in the Serie A with the Turin side having previously lost to Lazio back in October.last_img read more

Arsenal interviewed 10 candidates – Balague

first_imgGuillem Balague has revealed that Arsenal had interviewed 10 different candidates for their managerial vacancy, before opting for Unai EmeryThe Gunners have been actively pursuing candidates to succeed Arsene Wenger at the Emirates with likes of former Barcelona manager Luis Enrique and Juventus boss Massimiliano Allegri having been strongly linked with the post.However, recently these two candidates have since been ruled out and, as of last week, Mikel Arteta was believed to be the favourite for the vacancy after holding talks with the board.But now Emery has shockingly emerged as the leading candidate for the role, despite not being able to speak English.Balague confirmed that Arteta had indeed come close to receiving an offer, before Arsenal eventually decided in favour of Emery.“Arsenal have been speaking to ten different managers, ten different candidates, and it got to a point where they had to make a decision,” he told Sky Sports.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“Some of the candidates did not have much similar to each other. They were looking for a series of things which eventually led them to make Emery the number one candidate.“Arteta was one of those ten and came closest but at the end maybe the lack of experience worked against him. I’m sure from minute one he would have said he lacks experience himself. He had other things which Arsenal were impressed about.“Emery has the experience, has won trophies and done it with director’s of football wherever he has been. Valencia, Sevilla and PSG as well.“I’m not sure about this thing about embodying the shadow of Arsene Wenger – that is dangerous. He is his own man. He will work within the structure, he will make the team flexible. He will sharpen everybody up and will make sure the players come out onto the pitch knowing their obligations and responsibilities.“There has been a lot of [emphasis] in training and you will see that in the way Arsenal shape up in the future.”Emery won seven trophies in his two seasons at PSG, before being replaced by Thomas Tuchel.last_img read more

Pep Guardiola impressed with new boy Mahrez

first_imgPep Guardiola is impressed with the way Riyad Mahrez has smoothly settled into his new surroundings at Manchester City.The Algerian winger joined the Blues from the Foxes and has started one and came off the bench in two of City’s opening three Premier League games.And, speaking ahead of Saturday’s late kick-off with Newcastle United, Guardiola said he was more than satisfied with how the player had adapted to life at City.“I would say quite well, for how quickly he has adapted and especially for the quality,” said Pep.“He’s one of the most technical players I’ve ever seen, the skills and everything.“It’s just, of course, there’s a lot of information – the way we want to play, the way we want to do things, the corrections after the games that we have to do, in all things, defensive and offensive set-pieces.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“But he settled well. He has respect in the locker room and that is the most important thing.”After tomorrow’s visit of Rafa Benitez’s Magpies, the league takes a fortnight’s break with the focus switching to internationals.But asked whether the 2018/19 campaign was shaping up to be an even tougher proposition than last season, Pep said it was too early to judge.“Quite similar, I would say,” Guardiola added.“New managers are here – Marco Silva at Everton, Maurizio Sarri at Chelsea – new managers, new clubs. Javi Garcia at Watford is doing amazingly. But I think it’s too early.“Last season we cannot forget all the six contenders playing international competitions, not like the previous season when Chelsea didn’t play there. It was tough last season it will be tough this one.”last_img read more

Condé Nast Internal Memo Managing Through Challenging Times

first_imgCondé colleagues: GQ editor-in-chief Jim Nelson, publisher Peter  Hunsinger, chairman Si Newhouse and CEO Chuck Townsend in headier times.”Managing Through Challenging Times.” Is that the understatement of the year? No, it was the subject line of an e-mail Condé Nast CEO Charles Townsend sent to staffers Thursday.As news that the national unemployment rate jumped to 8.1 percent last month—the highest in 25 years—as a whopping 651,000 people lost their jobs, the mega magazine publishing chief executive called on his employees to “prudently and responsibly manage our business costs and expenses.” While Townsend didn’t detail any specific cost-cutting initiatives, he did say the company will need to make “difficult decisions to manage costs and ensure our financial well-being.” Are more layoffs to come?Late last year, Condé Nast laid off about 5 percent of both its print and online staff. In December, Condé closed its syndicated blog network and scrapped Flip.com, its social networking/virtual scrapbooking site for teen girls. In January, Condé Nast shuttered Domino, its four-year-old shelter title, and its accompanying Web site. Here’s Townsend’s memo, via All Things Digital:From: Townsend, ChuckSent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 05:04 PM Eastern Standard TimeTo: Conde Nast PublicationsSubject: Managing Through Challenging TimesI continue to believe that there are two things that make our Company truly unique, world-class brands and remarkable employees. This statement is even more true today as I watch how Condé Nast is managing through this challenging economy.While advertising pages are down, Condé Nast is gaining critical ad revenue market share through the early part of 2009. Perhaps more importantly, our consumer connectivity, as measured in key circulation statistics, is particularly strong.So, while our Company is not immune to the economic stress that has been experienced by the media community, we have made adjustments to secure our ongoing stability, just as each and every one of us has had to personally deal with the economic challenges we face.Unavoidably, as the downturn extends, we have to make additional difficult decisions to manage costs and ensure our financial well-being. These decisions involve all of us. We’ll all have to do more with less and accept that some of the benefits and resources that were available to us in robust economic times will have to be scaled back–and revisited when the economy and our business recover lost ground.The best course of action is for us to prudently and responsibly manage our business costs and expenses through these troubled waters, assuring us the opportunity to fully participate in the recovery that lies ahead. At that time, we will take great pride in what we accomplished.I can only ask that you join me in these efforts to ensure the continued success of our great Company.last_img read more

Town Reaches Contract Agreements With Firefighters Union Custodians Union

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Town of Wilmington recently ratified collective bargaining agreements with two unions in town — the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 1370 and the American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees Local 1703, Unit 1 (custodians and building maintenance workers).Fire Fighters Union“Basically, the major terms of the agreement are a COLA (Cost Of Living Adjustment) of 2.5% retroactive July 1, 2018; a 2.75% COLA beginning July 1, 2019; and a 2.75% COLA beginning July 1, 2020.” announced Hull at last week’s Selectmen’s Meeting. “There’s a number of language clarifications in the contract. One of the things we obtained was confirmation that when someone is out on unpaid leave, they won’t accrue personal, sick or vacation time… There was also an adjustment to their uniform allowance, with an increase from $700 to $1,000.”Selectmen unanimously approved and executed the agreement without discussion. The town had been negotiating with the union since early 2018.Custodians & Building Maintenance Workers Union“The contract expired on July 1, 2018. We’ve been negotiating with them since early 2018. They’ve received COLAs of 2.5% retroactive July 1, 2018; a 2.5% COLA beginning July 1, 2019; and a 2.5% COLA beginning July 1, 2020,” explained Hull. “The agreement also contained language indicating employees on unpaid leave would not accrue benefits. In addition, employees have to notify the town 72 hours in advance if they’re requesting vacation time. And we’ve codified what happens when someone accrues personal time after they’ve been hired. There had been confusion on this matter that led to a grievance.”Selectmen approved and executed the agreement without discussion. Selectman McCoy abstained from the vote.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NEWS: DPW & Library Staff, Town Secretaries & Admin Assistants To Receive 7.5% Salary Increase Over 3 YearsIn “Government”SELECTMEN NEWS: Town Enters Into New 3-Year Contract With Dispatchers UnionIn “Government”Wilmington Police Patrol Officers Sign New Agreement With TownIn “Government”last_img read more

Hostility towards ethnic people breaks all records Santu Larma

first_imgSantu Larma addressing a press conference on Saturday. Photo: Prothom AloThere has been no remedy to the violation of human rights of the indigenous communities, said president of Bangladesh Indigenous Peoples’ Forum Jyotirindra Bodhipriya Larma, popularly known as Santu Larma.”The state’s irresponsibility and hostility towards them have broken all previous records. The existence of the indigenous people is threatened,” alleged Santu Larma while addressing a press conference at a hotel in the capital on Saturday.The press conference was organised on the occasion of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples on 9 August.The leader of indigenous people said the government claims that the country has seen a wave of development, but millions of people, including ethnic people, poor farmers and labourers, are being washed away by this so-called development, he added.He said the government did nothing despite in landslides killing 131 people and affecting 20,000 families in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.Santu Larma said around 15000 people were starving in Sajek of Khagrachhari, 10000 tonnes of rice was needed, but the government remains indifferent.Santu Larma announced various programmes to mark 9 August. He said educationist professor Muhammed Zafar Iqbal will inaugurate the main event at Central Shaheed Minar while civil aviation and tourism minister Rashed Khan Menon will attend it as chief guest. Functions to mark the day will be organised in the districts where the ethnic people live.Oikya NAP president Pankaj Bhattacharya alleged that an attempt was on to wipe out the existence of indigenous people from the country. He terms this attitude as a collapse in the spirit of democracy and the spirit of the liberation war.Researcher columnist Syed Abul Maksud said, “Not only indigenous people, no one is in fine, except pro-Awami League people. The country does not only belong to the pro-AL people. We fought together to liberate the country.”Professor of Dhaka University Mesbah Kamal said the state does not recognise the existence of indigenous people. The election commission declares regional political parties will not be allowed to participate in the election, he said, adding that in the neighbouring country such parties participated in the elections and formed the government.Kamal called upon the EC to allow all parties including Parbatya Chattagram Jana Sanghati Samity to participate in the election.Indigenous Peoples’ Forum member secretary Sanjib Drang moderated the press conference addressed by human rights activist Numan Ahmed Khan, and organising secretaries of indigenous peoples’ forum Saktipad Tripura and Rabindra Saren.last_img read more

A section of JU teachers demand election to unelected posts

first_imgjahangirnagar universityA faction of Jahangirnagar University teachers on Monday staged a token ‘sit-in’ programme in front of vice chancellor’s office demanding academic council election for unelected and date-expired posts, reports UNB.The teachers under the banner of ‘Shommilito Shikkhak Shomaj’ also demanded the election of Jahangirnagar University Central Students’ Union (JUCSU) after ensuring congenial atmosphere on the campus.They took up positions in front of the VC’s office at 11am and staged the ‘sit-in’ until 1pm.Leader of the anti-VC alliance, professor Kamrul Ahsan said, “According to the university act, VC is compelled to hold elections of different unelected posts. VC professor Farzana Islam earlier decided to hold the elections within 6 May after discussing with the authorities. But, now she is delaying process by showing cause of her sicknesses.”Addressing the function, convener of the teachers’ unity and president of Jahangirnagar University Teachers’ Association (JUTA) professor Ajit Kumar Majumder said they want that the university authority would ensure the congenial democratic atmosphere on the campus and would follow the university acts.”We are not demanding the resignation of JU VC,” he added.Professor Jamal Uddin Runu, JUTA secretary professor Sohel Rana, professor Shamsul Alam Selim, professor Koushik Saha, professor Farid Ahmed, professor Khabir Uddin, professor Kamrul Ahsan and professor Mafruhi Satter, among others, spoke at the programme.Another faction of teachers backed by the VC – ‘Bangabandhur Adarsher Shikkhak Parishad’, termed the demands as inhuman and illogical.JU VC professor Farzana Islam has been on leave since 6 March due to illness.last_img read more

McCarthy Helps Lead Revamped Baltimore Branch NAACP

first_imgThe Baltimore City branch of the NAACP is regrouping with a new agenda and new leadership. The local branch will host a delegation of the city’s civil rights organizations in a meeting with new Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa next week and has announced a comprehensive economic inclusion agenda in cooperation with the organization’s national headquarters.“We’re taking the lead in bringing local civil rights organizations to a meeting on the 16th of this month. We’re going to be talking about his conversation around plain clothes units. We’re going to be talking about the consent decree,” said Anthony McCarthy, newly appointed executive director of the Baltimore branch.Anthony McCarthy, newly appointed executive director of the Baltimore branch.“The Baltimore NAACP, The National Action Network and the Urban League all plan to be intimately involved in moving forward with the implementation of the consent decree,” said McCarthy, who is a former spokesperson for Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh. McCarthy also served in the administrations of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Mayor Sheila Dixon. In addition, he is a former editor with the AFRO.McCarthy was appointed executive director by the chapter’s executive committee in January.  Ronald Flamer became president of the Baltimore NAACP after the controversial departure of long-time president Tessa Hill-Aston last Fall.Flamer believes the reinstatement of the executive director’s role will strengthen the chapter and return the Baltimore branch to its core advocacy work with an increasingly complex local civil rights agenda, which includes the Baltimore Police Department’s (BPD) consent decree and continuing the work of moving Baltimore’s economic, educational and public policy agendas forward.“We are excited to have someone of Anthony’s caliber take on this leadership position with the Baltimore City NAACP.  He has a strong history of social justice advocacy and brings decades of experience in public service and media to the job,” Flamer said.The Baltimore branch will take the lead in connecting with city government on recommendations in the NAACP’s 2018 Economic Inclusion Plan for Baltimore released Feb. 6 jointly with the organization’s national office and Maryland State Conference.Specific recommendations for jump starting economic viability in Baltimore include vacant land transfer to community land trusts and a local government-enforced crackdown on predatory lending practices that continue to negatively impact home ownership for African-Americans in Baltimore, according to the report.“We now look forward to utilizing these strategies for economic inclusion in our work with the community to truly make a difference,” said Edsel Brown, economic chair, NAACP Maryland State Conference.Collaboration is a key theme for both the Baltimore Branch and the NAACP national office this year.  The national headquarters recently experienced a shake-up in 2017 as well, dismissing Cornell Williams Brooks in the spring and replacing him with Derrick Johnson in Aug. 2017.Johnson quickly kicked off a “listening tour” in several cities, including Baltimore, amid the city branch’s turmoil and ultimate change in leadership.  The listening tour served as the impetus for the Economic Inclusion report.Finally, McCarthy said the local chapter has adopted a legislative agenda and plans to issue support letters on issues ranging from legislation in support of the city’s two HBCU’s (Coppin State and Morgan State Universities) to HB-687, proposed by State Delegate Antonio Haynes requiring security services at Baltimore’s senior housing sites.The Baltimore Branch of the NAACP was placed under administrative receivership last Fall after Hill-Aston’s departure.  The national organization appointed NAACP State Conference Director Gerald Stansbury as branch receiver. The Baltimore branch will hold elections for permanent officers this Fall. Flamer has not yet announced whether he will seek the presidency for a full term.In the meantime, McCarthy plans to prove the value of hiring full-time staff to support the Baltimore Branch through service.  “I’m committed to serving this organization. I am going to work diligently every day and earn my keep,” McCarthy said.last_img read more

I Came Home for Jealous So Should Black Dems for Hogan

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, AFRO Baltimore Editor, syoes@afro.comI voted for Larry Hogan in 2014. However, I won’t be voting for him in 2018, because I am voting for Ben Jealous in November.Here’s why.I voted for Hogan over Rep. Anthony Brown (then Lt. Gov. Brown) and it wasn’t even a close call for me. I interviewed Brown on more than one occasion and I spoke to people who dealt with him on a regular basis in the months leading up the 2014 election and two things seemed abundantly clear to me; Brown didn’t seem genuinely interested in the fate of Baltimore City and he didn’t seem particularly eager to help resolve the HBCU lawsuit against Maryland favorably for the state’s majority Black higher education institutions, and begin to repair the fiscal Jim Crow implemented against HBCU’s in Maryland for decades.So, it wasn’t really hard for me to cast a vote for Hogan, the avuncular, seemingly harmless moderate Republican. Ultimately, when it comes to elections, I’m actually an Independent. But, unlike Sens. Angus King of Maine and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, in 2014 I went with the Republican. And I wasn’t alone.Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)According to a Washington Post-University of Maryland poll, Hogan garnered 12.4 percent of the Black Democrat vote in 2014 (Trump won 8 percent of the total Black vote in 2016). According to the same poll, only 27 percent of the so-called “Hogan Democrats” approved of the job Martin O’Malley, did during the years Brown served as his Lieutenant Governor. This is an important data point of the Post-UM poll; the apparent general dissatisfaction of Hogan Democrats generally and Black Democrats specifically during the O’Malley-Brown years, probably made pulling the lever for Hogan more palatable. I know it did for me. But, I argue many Black Democrats weren’t just voting against O’Malley and/or Brown in 2014, I suspect a significant number were voting against the Democratic establishment machine for various reasons.Personally, during the 2018 primary process, I leaned towards Jealous (for reasons I’ll expound upon later). But, once I got to sit down with Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker (who I had never met before), Jealous’ most formidable opponent, I saw why so many people I respect were on Baker’s team and had been for many years. Then I saw the phalanx of Maryland’s Democratic establishment figures, led by O’Malley line up behind Baker. That did it for me; I enthusiastically voted for Jealous on June 26.Now, it is time for Black Democrats or Black Independents, who typically vote Democrat (like me) to come home to Jealous.I’ve known Jealous for a long time; I don’t know him extremely well, but I know enough to know that he is no darling of the Democratic establishment. Maryland’s Democratic machine has far too often taken the Black vote and Black people for granted and has at times (too many times) been openly hostile to Black progressive political leaders within the party (Sen. Jill Carter comes to mind).Jealous is at the apex of progressive Democratic leadership, not just here in Maryland, but nationally (he has been endorsed by Sanders and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA.), among others). As we find ourselves combating virulent strains of authoritarianism and fascism (not hyperbole), spewing wildly from the White House, an authentic Progressive movement is needed in America now more than any other time in my lifetime. Jealous has crafted a Progressive platform essential to many in Maryland’s burgeoning disenfranchised communities. Throughout his adult life Jealous has been a champion for these communities.On November 6, the winner of Maryland’s gubernatorial race will likely be a strong indicator of the breadth and ferocity of the much anticipated “blue wave” predicted to sweep across the nation on Election Day. For the sake of most Black and Brown people, poor people, the working class and LGBTQ community, I hope it is Jealous.But, in order for Jealous to win in Maryland, Black Democrats who voted for Hogan in 2014 have to “come back home” in a big way.Sean Yoes is the AFRO’s Baltimore Editor and the author of, Baltimore After Freddie Gray: Real Stories From One of Baltimore’s Great Imperiled Cities.last_img read more

Carbon uptake in Tibetan Plateau soil may offset melting permafrost carbon release

first_img Explore further Citation: Carbon uptake in Tibetan Plateau soil may offset melting permafrost carbon release (2017, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-carbon-uptake-tibetan-plateau-soil.html © 2017 Phys.org Anyone paying attention to the science surrounding global warming has heard about the problem of carbon released into the atmosphere due to permafrost melting in colder parts of the planet. Less well known or understood is what happens to the soil above the permafrost. As temperatures rise, soil above the permafrost becomes warmer, offering a haven for new plant growth—such plants have been found to sequester carbon from the air back into the soil. Thus, as more carbon is released from below, more is sequestered from above, but is it possible that new sequestering offsets old release? That is what the researchers with this new effort want to know. To learn more, they studied soil samples taken from multiple sites in the Tibetan Plateau (a large elevated plateau north of the Himalayas) in the early 2000s and compared them with similar samples taken a decade later.The researchers report that the soil samples were taken from depths up to 30 cm (which is above the permafrost line) and found an average accumulation of carbon in the soil to have occurred at a mean rate of 28.0 g cm−2 yr−1, which they concluded was due to accumulation of organic carbon concentrations (material left when plants died). They describe the increase as substantial, and possibly enough to offset carbon released due to permafrost melting. More tests will have to be conducted to determine if there is a true offset, but the study results suggest that climate change models might have to be adjusted if offsetting occurs in regions much farther north. If carbon released by melting permafrost in Russia, Canada and other parts of the world is offset by new plant growth, it is possible that much less carbon will make its way into the atmosphere than has been predicted, resulting in slower than predicted global warming. More information: Jinzhi Ding et al. Decadal soil carbon accumulation across Tibetan permafrost regions, Nature Geoscience (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2945AbstractPermafrost soils store large amounts of carbon. Warming can result in carbon release from thawing permafrost, but it can also lead to enhanced primary production, which can increase soil carbon stocks. The balance of these fluxes determines the nature of the permafrost feedback to warming. Here we assessed decadal changes in soil organic carbon stocks in the active layer—the uppermost 30 cm—of permafrost soils across Tibetan alpine regions, based on repeated soil carbon measurements in the early 2000s and 2010s at the same sites. We observed an overall accumulation of soil organic carbon irrespective of vegetation type, with a mean rate of 28.0 g C m−2 yr−1 across Tibetan permafrost regions. This soil organic carbon accrual occurred only in the subsurface soil, between depths of 10 and 30 cm, mainly induced by an increase of soil organic carbon concentrations. We conclude that the upper active layer of Tibetan alpine permafrost currently represents a substantial regional soil carbon sink in a warming climate, implying that carbon losses of deeper and older permafrost carbon might be offset by increases in upper-active-layer soil organic carbon stocks, which probably results from enhanced vegetation growth. Journal information: Nature Geosciencecenter_img Natural-colour satellite image of the Tibetan Plateau. Credit: NASA This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Study shows microbes may accelerate loss of permafrost in Greenland (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that carbon uptake in the Tibetan Plateau may actually offset the carbon that is released as permafrost melts. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes soil readings they analyzed from the region and what their findings suggest about carbon release in cold parts of the world.last_img read more

TMCP to crack down on those demanding money for admissions

first_imgKolkata: A day after Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee instructed police commissioner Rajeev Kumar to take stern action against those involved in collecting money for giving admission in colleges, Trinamool Chatra Parishad (TMCP) has also decided to crack the whip against such individuals.TMCP president Jaya Dutta will hold a meeting with student representatives from various colleges at Trinamool Bhavan beginning from Monday, giving clear instructions of abstaining from demanding money from any student for admission. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”The party has made it clear that those who will disobey the directions in this regard and will indulge in corruption for his/her own interest, will have to land in jail. There will be no place for him/her in the party,” Dutta said, who had been assigned the responsibility to communicate the party’s strong stand in this regard.It has been learnt that Dutta will hold a meeting with representatives from Central Kolkata colleges on Monday, South Kolkata colleges on Tuesday and North Kolkata colleges on Wednesday. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPIt may be mentioned that immediately after the CM’s instructions, Kolkata Police on Staurday posted a message on their Facebook page, inviting complaints against people who are demanding money to ensure admission to colleges. It has been learnt that the Chief Minister became furious after reports of students asking for money from freshers to get them admitted in different colleges surfaced in the media.Acting on two complaints, Kolkata Police have already arrested four students, for allegedly extorting money to arrange seats in colleges. Senior police officials are expected to visit some colleges in the city, to ensure smooth admission procedures on Monday. Extra police force will be deployed outside colleges where admissions are going on. Outsiders will not be allowed inside the college premises and only merit should be the criterion for admission.Kolkata Police has posted on Facebook, asking people to email or WhatsApp complaints about extortion related to college admissions.It may be mentioned that in the core committee meeting held at Netaji Indoor Stadium recently, Mamata Banerjee had categorically said that no money should be taken from students on the pretext of providing admissions in colleges and stern actions would be taken against those involved in the matter.The Bidhannagar City Police, on its Facebook and Twitter page, has put up an email id: bdncitypolice@gmmail.com and a WhatsApp number: 9051518444, on which a person can register his/her complaint if there is a demand for money for admission.last_img read more

BJPs name shows on EVM during mock poll at Barrackpore

first_imgKolkata: Taking strong exception to the name of the party written under the symbol of BJP during a mock poll at Barrackpore, the Trinamool Congress has lodged a complaint with the office of the Chief Electoral Officer (CEO) of Bengal.TMC had raised questions over the act as the name of no other party is written under its respective symbol, except the saffron party. The ruling party alleged that BJP is trying to influence the Commission through such an act. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe anomaly was perceived during the mock poll at the office of the SDO of Barrackpore on Friday morning. Soon, the polling agents of TMC who were present during the mock poll protested and started agitating. The mock poll was stopped and a complaint was lodged with the returning officer. Congress also joined the protest along with TMC. It may be mentioned that Arjun Singh is contesting on the ticket of the saffron party from the Barrackpore seat, while Dinesh Trivedi is the candidate for Trinamool Congress. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateLater in the day, a delegation of TMC led by its secretary general Partha Chatterjee, along with senior TMC leaders Tapas Roy, Derek O Brien, Subrata Bakshi and Subhasish Chakraborty met CEO Ariz Aftab and lodged a complaint in this regard. “We have seen during the elections till date that only the symbol of a political party is present on the EVM. The name of any political party does not feature on it. If the name of one party is written then it should have been so for other parties as well. It seems that a political party is trying to use technology with an evil intention. We have urged the Commission to take immediate action so that such things are not reflected during the elections,” Chatterjee said. Barrackpore, along with six other Lok Sabha constituencies namely Bongaon, Howrah, Uluberia, Sreerampore, Hooghly and Arambagh goes to polls on May 6, the fifth phase of the ongoing seven phase elections. TMC district president, North 24-Parganas, Jyotipriya Mallick said: “We are witnessing strange things during the elections this year. How can the name of a political party be written under the symbol? The act is illegal and BJP has done this with malafide intentions. They have realised that they will be defeated and so they are doing such things out of desperation.” TMC has also pointed out in its complaint that similar things had also occurred during the mock poll at Raiganj, where the elections have already been held. A senior official of the CEO’s office said that they have forwarded the report of the District Magistrate in this regard to the Election Commission of India for necessary action.last_img read more

WestJet disappointed over cabin crew certification plus fare increases likely coming

first_img By: The Canadian Press Wednesday, August 1, 2018 Share Tags: CIRB, CUPE, WestJet, WestJet Encore, WestJet Swoop CALGARY — WestJet says the Canada Industrial Relations Board has issued an interim order to allow the Canadian Union of Public Employees to represent cabin crew members.The union had filed an application with the CIRB on July 10 to represent the flight attendants after a majority signed cards stating they supported joining CUPE, including WestJet’s mainline carrier and low-cost carrier Swoop.But WestJet said Tuesday night that the interim order does not include members of Encore or Swoop cabin crew.The airline also said it has until Aug. 10 to make submissions on which positions to exclude from the bargaining unit.The move by CUPE to sign up flight attendants follows the unionization of the airline’s pilots who are represented by the Air Line Pilots Association.“We are disappointed by this outcome but respect the rights of our employees to choose their representation,” said WestJet president and CEO Ed Sims in a statement. “We now shift our focus to working effectively with CUPE in the interest of success for WestJet as a whole.”More news:  Air Canada’s global sales update includes Managing Director, Canada & USA SalesNews of the CIRB decision comes hours after the airline said it had posted its first quarterly loss in 13 years.WestJet said it lost $20.8 million in the second quarter and warned that passengers should expect to see higher fares later this year to compensate for rising fuel costs that contributed to the loss.“I think this is the way guests now need to think is that airfares will be rising just as they did back in 2010, 2011 when we had the last major fare spike,” Sims said in an interview.The increases will likely be felt this fall after the negative effects on demand from a threatened pilots strike dissipate.“We firmly believe that by the time we get to late September, October we’ll start to see more of those fare increases sticking and more guests understanding that we are passing on the cost of the fuel increase.”Even though the second-quarter results beat analyst expectations, Sims conceded they were “disappointing” and that its 2018 results are “off track”.More news:  Transat calls Groupe Mach’s latest offer “highly abusive, coercive and misleading”“We are now operating in a very different fuel and competitive environment,” he said during a conference call.The Calgary-based airline said it was forced to offer discounts that partially offset five fare increases this year to stimulate travel and restore passenger confidence.“To build flow-on benefits like ancillary revenues, we had to be aggressive both to recover those guests who would otherwise have booked away or booked with a competitor but also to compete with this almost unprecedented level of peak season capacity,” Sims added.The threat of the strike wiped out tens of millions of dollars in profit in the second quarter that pushed the airline to break a 52-quarter streak of profitability, chief financial officer Harry Taylor said in a conference call.“We start rebuilding from today,” Sims said in an interview. “I think when any sports team breaks their winning streak their first focus is how do you rebuild that streak.” WestJet “disappointed” over cabin crew certification, plus fare increases likely coming << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

He was kind gentle and thoughtful Industry veteran Ed Day dies at

first_img Tuesday, June 25, 2019 “He was kind, gentle and thoughtful”: Industry veteran Ed Day dies at 49 TORONTO — Ed Day was a much-loved and respected travel industry veteran whose sudden passing is generating an outpouring of memories and condolences.His death over the weekend “has come as a massive shock”, says Hayden Yates, Travel Industry Sales & Marketing Director for Disney Destinations.Yates worked with Day for several years, ever since Day joined Disney as DSM, Ontario for The Walt Disney Company (Canada) in 2016.Before coming onboard with Disney, Day was Sales Manager, Canada for SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, from 2011 to 2016. Other stints in the industry include Park N Fly Canada as Senior Sales Rep, from 2007 to 2011. Day was also Sales Manager for Jade Tours from 2003 to 2006.“Our deepest condolences go out to Ed’s family. He has a young son,” said Yates. Day was 49 years old.Industry friends are sharing their memories of Day on Facebook, he added. “It just goes to show how big a personality he had in the industry,” says Yates. “He was so kind, gentle and thoughtful.”More news:  Kory Sterling is TL Network Canada’s new Sales Manager CanadaFuneral services are taking place Thursday, June 27. Friends and family may visit McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (905-428-8488) from 12–3 p.m. Funeral service will follow in the chapel at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting donations be made to a GoFundMe campaign (http://gf.me/u/tqgssm), which will be used solely for Braydon’s future education and for sports. Alternatively, donations can also be made to the following account via direct transfer: 06702-003-5396379. Online condolences may be placed at www.mceachniefuneral.ca. Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Posted bylast_img read more

Costa Ricas president criticizes growing military spending in Latin America

first_imgA week after Costa Rica celebrated the66th anniversary of the abolition of its armed forces, President Luis Guillermo Solís criticized growing arms spending in Latin America during a speech at the Ibero-American Summit in Veracruz, Mexico, on Sunday. In his remarks Solís noted a “troubling” tendency in the region toward militarization.“When I look at Latin America I am concerned about too much spending on arms. I believe that while there is a legitimate interest in defending one’s country, there are other productive and social needs that require these resources that are not abundant in our countries,” Solís said.Latin America spends a relatively small amount on arms compared to the rest of the world, with the United States and China as the top two big spenders. But while arms buying might not attract attention internationally, Latin America has seen significant increases in military investment in recent years, according to figures compiled by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, which tracks global military spending. Brazil is the biggest military spender in Latin America, after recently acquiring a nuclear submarine and an air carrier, when it dropped a cool $31.5 billion in 2013, according to SIPRI.Central America as a region has seen the largest relative growth in military spending in Latin America, according to SIPRI. In 2013, Central America and the Caribbean spent $9.6 billion on their armed forces, up 6 percent from 2012 compared to a 1.6 percent increase in South America. In 2012, Central America and the Caribbean saw an 8.1 percent increase in military spending, the largest percentage change in the world that year.Increased military spending by Costa Rica’s northern neighbor, Nicaragua, has rattled officials here. Foreign Minister Manuel González said in September that Nicaragua’s expressed desire to purchase naval and air assets from Russia was a concern for Costa Rica and the region as a whole. In May, ex-Foreign Minister Enrique Castillo accused Russia of trying to set up military bases in Nicaragua.“That’s why I want to use this opportunity to make a call for prudence and reason on this subject that has spread across Latin America. I look with concern at this situation and how these decisions could lead us to undesirable results,” the president said. Facebook Comments Related posts:Costa Rican veterans reflect 66 years after abolition of army Costa Rica seeks Nobel Peace Prize for abolishing its army Landmark Arms Trade Treaty spearheaded by Costa Rica’s ex-President Óscar Arias goes into effect Costa Rica announces its own international aid policylast_img read more

UK pay TV operator BSkyB has named Martin Gilbert

first_imgUK pay TV operator BSkyB has named Martin Gilbert and Matthieu Pigasse as independent non-executive directors. The pair are expected to take up their positions on the board on November 29 following the retirement of David Evans and Allan Leighton.Gilbert is founder shareholder and CEO of fund management group Aberdeen Asset Management, while Pigasse is CEO of Lazard France and vice-chairman of Lazard Europe, as well as owner of publishing group Les Inrockuptibles and co-controlling shareholder of newspaper publisher Le Monde and the French edition of the Huffington Post.last_img

In This Issue… The dollar loosens it grip Jo

first_imgIn This Issue… * The dollar loosens it grip * Jobs market continued to improve * Investors testing Norges * A rate hike in the cards And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts! Clear as mud… Good day…and a Fabulous Friday to one and all. This will take care of my call from the bullpen for now, so Chris will have the ball for the next couple of weeks until Chuck returns at the end of the month. The summer time heat finally loosened its grip on St. Louis yesterday and the dollar strength which had a tight hold in the markets earlier in the week saw some pullback. We didn’t see much action in the overnight markets Thursday morning so everything was fairly flat when I sat down at my desk. The dollar buying frenzy did subside, but we didn’t see a total reversal that would offset the damage from Tuesday and Wednesday. I guess you could say the US dollar party got a warning for being a little too loud but it hasn’t gotten broken up just yet. I think the novelty of the Fed statements have started to wear away and investors are looking for more confirmation that QE3 really has been relegated back to the basement and additional data before they go much further. That’s not to say we could see some safe haven buying here and there, but I think it would be a while before the Fed could officially rule out additional stimulus measures. With that being said, we could see more emphasis placed on the US economic reports over the next couple of months as investors try and gauge where things actually stand, with the caveat that problems in Europe don’t flare up. While data has seen improvement in certain areas, there hasn’t been enough, in my opinion, to demonstrate the economy has the traction to carry on without the safety net of government stimulus. We did have several reports to talk about from yesterday morning, so let’s jump right in. Starting with the producer price index, wholesale inflation, the annualized figure did fall, as expected, in February to 3.3%, from the previous reading of 4.1%, and marked the slowest year over year gain since 2010. We saw the same thing with the cost of imported goods as the annual figure dropped lower, however, the monthly figure for both PPI and the import index gave us much higher readings than the previous reports. In fact, wholesale prices rose 0.4% from January and reflected the highest increase in five months. The Labor Department prints three monthly inflation reports, two of which we’ve already seen, so today we see the final gauge of inflation for February through the consumer price index. The CPI numbers are expected to fall in line with the other reports by showing no year over year inflation but is expected to show a monthly increase. The headline CPI number is expected to rise 0.4% in February, but core inflation is forecast to remain flat. The only problem with the core calculation is that both food and energy are taken out of the equation, which happens to be the two most frequently used consumer products. When the Fed stated oil will push up inflation temporarily, it’ll be interesting to see just how temporary this scenario plays out, especially if demand really does pick up. Moving over to the employment side of things, the jobs environment demonstrated another week of a step in the right direction as initial jobless claims fell to 351k, the lowest level in four years, from last week’s upward revision to 365k. The four week moving average, which is typically a less volatile figure, held firm at just under 356k. The number of people collecting unemployment benefits, which doesn’t include extended benefits, decreased to 3.34 million. With employment continuing to head in the right direction, the Bloomberg consumer comfort report yielded the highest level since March 2008. The equity markets have been on the rise over the past several months, so seeing positive returns on those portfolio statements also goes a long way in making someone feel a little better. The U. of Michigan confidence report will be released this morning so I’m sure we’ll see another pickup in the happy factor. The TIC flows, which measures international demand for longer term US financial instruments, surged in January to $101 billion. The markets used to pay attention and actually consider this a must see report, but the Fed pretty much threw water all over it when they kicked the printing presses into high gear. Anyway, thoughts of whether Greece would default or get another bailout spurred the safe haven movement into US Treasuries so that pretty much explains the rise. Other than that, nothing new as China and Japan still own over $2 trillion worth of Treasuries combined. Rounding out the remaining data reports from yesterday, the regional manufacturing figures both increased to multi-month highs and points to a rise in the national report, the ISM, which is due on April 2. The other reports that I haven’t touched on include industrial production and capacity utilization. If the secondary manufacturing reports and other indications hold true, we should see improvement in both figures. Looking ahead to next week, it’s shaping up to be a fairly slow week in the data department as it will pretty much be dominated by February housing numbers. As I mentioned earlier, the US dollar lost ground yesterday even though we had some positive economic numbers that could have kept the rally going. It looks like investors were willing to again venture out into the riskier asset arena as equities rose along with the major currencies. The trend that’s been in place for quite some time, which consists of positive US or global economic news promotes a weaker dollar, was back in the ring. I’m sure some of the cheaper prices, namely in gold and silver, enticed investors to get off the couch. The New Zealand dollar topped the charts by turning in a nearly 1.25% performance. An increase in February manufacturing to almost a two year high gave the kiwi an extra shot and gave investors a reason to pick up the currency at a seven week low. We’re starting to see better economic data coming out of New Zealand, but the much larger economy from Australia often casts a shadow they can’t escape. The Swiss franc remained near the top of the currency returns leader board yesterday by gaining just over 1%. The SNB, Swiss National Bank, met yesterday and kept interest rates on hold as expected. There wasn’t any earth shattering news surrounding the meeting, but they did express a more upbeat attitude regarding the economy. The SNB raised its growth forecast for this year by predicting GDP will rise 0.8%, instead of the previous estimate of 0.5%, and pushed away the prospects of a recession. The SNB also reiterated they will defend the 1.20 per euro ceiling that was established in September with the utmost determination. They don’t want to appear overly optimistic and attract too much attention, so continuing to fly under the radar is where policy makers would like to stay. While 4th quarter GDP and investor confidence has risen recently, the central bank is still concerned about deflation derailing the recent economic stabilization. One of the statements from the SNB explained that while the high value of the franc continues to present enormous challenges to the economy, the minimum exchange rate is having an impact. They went on to say the ceiling has reduced the extreme exchange rate volatility and has given business leaders a better basis for planning. In the end, any currency appreciation will be met with government intervention and economic policy changes look to be a long ways down the road, so there’s no reason to spend much time here in the foreseeable future. The Norwegian krone, interestingly enough, finished in the top five after its dismal performance on Wednesday. They did report a record trade surplus in February as rising oil prices boosted exports, but it looks as though speculators were trying to crack the code as the government’s pain threshold on currency gains. The central bank indicated after the rate cut on Wednesday they intend on keeping rates on hold for the rest of the year unless justified otherwise. Policy makers indicated on Wednesday they don’t defend a specific krone level and that interest rate policy will only respond to the extent that the exchange rate affects the inflation outlook. Most of the currencies had solid returns yesterday anyway so I’m not so sure that speculators trying to break the central bank’s resolve was the prime player. Nonetheless, these were some of the news headlines floating around yesterday and had some investors thinking about another Swiss type of situation. The Canadian dollar didn’t have the same returns as New Zealand or Norway, but it did remain in positive territory and got close to breaking back into the $1.01 handle. On the data side of the table, existing home sales in February rose 1.4% and the average home price climbed 2%. We also saw a Canadian consumer confidence poll rise to its highest level in a year. The higher oil prices and positive US data are starting to feed through to the Canadian economy, not to mention two fundamental pillars of strength which include a commodity based economy and a healthy fiscal position. As I was sifting through the news last night, I saw a story that traders now have over a 50% chance that we could see a rate hike by year end. That scenario might be a stretch given the Bank of Canada likes to follow in the Fed’s footsteps when it comes to rate decisions, but just seeing that thought kicked around says a lot about the Canadian economy. Gold and silver saw some renewed life yesterday as they both traded up around 1% throughout the day. Since they have gotten beat up this week, it looks like the buying on dips crowd were stirring around and scooped up the metals at cheaper prices. I also saw where physical gold demand from India yesterday was the highest level since January of last year, so I’m sure that helped as well. As I came in this morning, the overnight markets didn’t really give us any solid direction as everything traded in a fairly tight range. If anything, the dollar has strengthened this morning but nothing to write home about. There weren’t any global economic reports that held any market moving weight, but we did see a measure of European exports rise for a third month in January. If we look back to December and January, the euro was under some selling pressure from the Greek related anxieties so I’m sure that went a long way helping exporters with a cheaper euro. Then there was this… Evidence of a global economic recovery is real, but the level of optimism it has created deserves skepticism, according to The Economist. Growth is likely to be slower this year than last. In the U.S., stimulus should focus on higher wages, affordable housing, increased health care spending, and pensions. “If policymakers get it wrong again, the recovery could yet turn to dust,” the magazine notes. To recap…The dollar couldn’t keep the party going as most of the major currencies appreciated throughout the day. Consumer confidence displayed another rise as the labor market continues to show life. We saw another drop in the initial jobless claims figure and regional manufacturing reports continue to show improvement. The New Zealand dollar rose against the dollar as domestic manufacturing increased to a two year high and the SNB kept rates on hold while reiterating their commitment to the currency ceiling. The Norwegian krone appreciated despite Wednesday’s rate cut and the odds of a rate hike in Canada increased to over 50%. Currencies today. American Style: A$ $1.0529, kiwi .8184, C$ $1.0064, euro 1.3053, sterling 1.5728, Swiss $1.0811, . European Style: rand 7.6424, krone 5.7910, SEK 6.8088, forint 223.79, zloty 3.1641, koruna 18.8008, RUB 29.40, yen 83.72, sing 1.2623, HKD 7.7636, INR 50.3025, China 6.3229, pesos 12.6874, BRL 1.7983, Dollar Index 80.37, Oil $105.20, 10-year 2.31%, Silver $32.42, and Gold. $1,648.18 That’s it for today…I’ll be glued to the tv this weekend with all of the college basketball games, but my focus will be centered this afternoon when the Missouri Tigers hit the court. We also have St. Patrick’s Day this weekend so top o’ the morning to all that have Irish heritage. I have some Irish blood, so maybe I’ll enjoy a green beverage or two on Saturday, but you wouldn’t guess it be looking at me. You would probably think my holiday of choice would be Columbus Day as my Italian features are fairly prominent. Since I have both nationalities running through my veins, I guess I’m set either way. That’s it for me today and Chris will be back in the saddle on Monday, so until next time…Have a Great Day!! Mike Meyer Assistant Vice President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837 www.everbank.comlast_img read more

Cholera is in the headlines again Last fall the

first_imgCholera is in the headlines again. Last fall, the World Health Organization declared an ongoing outbreak in Yemen the worst in recorded history, with more than 1 million cases. The outbreak first struck Yemen back in 2016, surged in May 2017 and has now flared up again. There have been more than 2,500 deaths so far.”We have been confronted with a sharp increase since the beginning of this year,” said Brienne Prusak of Doctors Without Borders (MSF). In that time, they’ve seen an increase from 140 to 2,000 cases per week to reach about 1.4 million cases since the outbreak began. Since January, the death toll has been 190.Meanwhile, in the aftermath of Cyclone Idai, cases are surfacing in Mozambique and other affected countries. This week, the first death from cholera in Mozambique was reported in the city of Beira.It’s a reminder that an ancient disease – and one which is easily treatable — can still take a terrible toll in modern times.Fast KillerCholera can kill a person in a matter of hours.It’s a severe gastrointestinal disease, transmitted by a bacterium called Vibrio cholerae. And it can trigger so much diarrhea and vomiting that patients can rapidly become dehydrated. They can lose so much fluid that their internal organs shut down.As we reported in 2016, the water-borne disease has been around for centuries, and it remains a global health risk. According to the World Health Organization there are roughly 3 million cases a year and 90,000 deaths.Cases crop up throughout the world — particularly when crisis strikes and clean drinking water is not available, as in Yemen. Cholera often spreads through water that has been contaminated by bacteria; it often enters the water from the diarrhea of someone who is infected.On March 14, Cyclone Idai wrought devastation across Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi, with more than 815 reported deaths. In the wake of the disaster, which was the worst to hit southern Africa in two decades according to UNICEF, 3 million people need humanitarian assistance, half of them are children.In addition to injuring thousands, the cyclone also damaged infrastructure and flooded sources of drinking water, especially in the hardest-hit port city of Beira, Mozambique.”The cyclone substantially damaged the city’s water supply system, resulting in many people having no access to clean drinking water,” Gert Verdonck, MSF’s emergency coordinator in Beira, said in a statement. “This means that they have no option but to drink from contaminated wells. Some people are even resorting to drinking stagnant water by the side of the road.”Public health officials were concerned about the possible spread of cholera in Mozambique–and last week, five cases were confirmed.By Monday, that number had jumped to 1,000 suspected cases.”There are seven emergency cholera treatment centers operational in Beira and two more being set up. Two additional centers are being set up in Nhamatanda,” David Wightwick, the World Health Organization’s team leader in Beira, told the Associated Press.WHO will begin administering 900,000 doses of the oral cholera vaccine on Wednesday.The disease recently struck other countries in Africa as well. Last year, there were 10,000 cholera cases in northern Nigeria — a record for that region — with 175 known deaths. Public health specialists fear that Nigeria is headed toward another outbreak following a recent spate of violence that has led to overcrowding at displacement camps.Last year, there were also outbreaks in Zimbabwe, Niger, Cameroon, Somalia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Mozambique and Tanzania, according to WHO.Ancient HistoryEven though cholera is making headlines in 2019, it’s hardly a new disease.”It’s been in the Ganges delta from time immemorial,” says Dr. David Sack, a professor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Cholera began spreading from India throughout the West in the early 1800s with more global trade and travel by ships, he explained, with cases cropping up from Russia and Western Europe to Baltimore, New York and Philadelphia.”It was a disease that affected large parts of the world,” he says. And it killed millions of people as it spread across the globe. Left untreated, cholera has a fatality rate of about 50 percent.”At that time, we didn’t know what caused it,” says Sack, who’s spent much of his career studying the disease. “We didn’t know how to treat it.”Theories about the cause of the illness were plentiful. The leading suspect was the foul air rising from sewers and piles of rotting trash in cities; poison from the soil was another possible culprit. Others looked higher up for a cause: Some church leaders said it was retribution by God for sinful behavior.Nearly all of the theories had a common thread, though. There appeared to be a link between cholera and overcrowded urban areas.Finally, in the 1850s, an English doctor named John Snow became a legend of public health for figuring out that an outbreak in the Soho neighborhood of London was linked to a single drinking water source. Dr. Snow is credited with stopping the raging outbreak, which claimed 10,000 lives across London, by taking the handle off of the Broad Street water pump.Snow argued correctly that water contaminated with sewage was spreading the illness from one resident to another. But he still didn’t know exactly what the water was contaminated with; at the time, the pathogen that caused cholera hadn’t yet been discovered. He theorized that it might be tiny parasites or germs or some “poison” able to reproduce in the water.Around the same time an Italian scientist, Filippo Pacini, identified the bacteria that causes cholera. But his discovery wouldn’t be widely accepted for decades — and in the meantime, millions more died.Souped-Up Sugar WaterCholera now is a treatable disease — as long as the patient gets medical attention quickly.”A patient with cholera should never die,” Sack says. “If they get to a treatment center in time, if they still have a breath, we can save their life.”Treatment consists of simply keeping the person hydrated. If they are capable of drinking, they can be treated with oral rehydration fluids — basically souped-up sugar water. This strategy works in about 80 percent of cholera cases. In more severe cases, the patient may need to be given fluids intravenously alongside antibiotics.There are also three vaccines that can be administered in areas where cholera is endemic or when an epidemic begins to spread. More than 30 million people have been immunized since the oral vaccines were developed in the late 1980s.WHO’s Global Task Force for Cholera Control announced a plan in October 2017 to end cholera by reducing cholera deaths by 90 percent and eliminating the disease in as many as 20 countries by 2030.A major challenge, however, is access to safe water and good sanitation — both key to preventing outbreaks. Otherwise, cholera persists even after an epidemic begins to slow.Lessons From HaitiOne of the biggest outbreaks in history took place in Haiti, where cholera was introduced by U.N. Peacekeepers in the wake of the 2010 earthquake. It spread quickly; since 2010, there have been 819,000 cases and nearly 10,000 deaths from the disease.In 2018, Haiti saw fewer than 4,000 suspected cases and 41 deaths — a massive improvement even from the year before.But there is always the chance of resurgence — especially as public health resources shift to the growing 2019 outbreaks.”This significant progress so far is to be considered with great caution,” the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said in a January 2019 report on the Haiti outbreak.”As long as cholera is circulating on the Haitian territory, an upsurge and expansion of the epidemic is possible.”And that’s a reminder that this ancient disease is still a powerful threat.Melody Schreiber (@m_scribe on Twitter) is a freelance journalist in Washington, D.C. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Userled and disabled peoples organisations hold

first_imgUser-led and disabled people’s organisations hold the key to fighting back against the government’s long-term assault on the welfare state, according to a leading disabled academic.In his new book, All Our Welfare: Towards Participatory Social Policy, Professor Peter Beresford argues that service-user and disabled people’s organisations (DPOs) “offer a force for achieving change” and for moving towards a “future sustainable welfare state”.Beresford (pictured), who chairs Shaping Our Lives, the national network of disabled people and service users, says in his book that the new identity movements of the 1970s – such as the disabled people’s movement – developed new ways of thinking.They offered new ideas and models of support, and more equal methods of research; and they developed co-operatives, and focused on environmental sustainability and the importance of meeting people’s needs and rights.But faced with a dominant right-wing media and politics, they survived only as an “undercurrent”.Now, he says, the disabled people’s movement, which overcame “massive struggles” to develop its own pioneering, user-led services, can provide the foundation for a new “revisioned” welfare state, pushing back against the current media and political forces that want to marginalise the idea of welfare.“I don’t see any other progressive way forward,” he told Disability News Service (DNS). “If we don’t manage to have that then I fear for where this country will be heading.”He believes that successive governments have performed a “conjuring trick”, by transforming the welfare state – which historically has included services such as the NHS, social care, education and social housing – to simply mean welfare benefits.“The welfare state, according to this government, is now ‘welfare’,” he says, “which means ‘people getting benefits that you are paying for, who are scum.’ That’s how they are presenting it.”But Beresford, who is professor of citizen participation at the University of Essex and emeritus professor at Brunel University, is convinced that the seeds of the downfall of the government’s right-wing, anti-welfare state approach have already been sown.“It’s difficult to be optimistic in terms of how many terrible things are going to continue to happen,” he told DNS, “but I don’t see it is a sustainable road of travel in where we are headed, I really don’t.”He believes that younger people will feel more and more beleaguered by the prospect of huge higher education debts, and having to find the money to cope with job insecurity and – if the welfare state continues to be whittled away – healthcare, pensions and social care.Young families with disabled children “will not tolerate what people tolerated 20, 30, 50 years ago; they want a life for their children; they see their children as like anybody else”.And older people, he says, now worry about their grandchildren, and where their jobs will come from, and where they will live.He believes these factors will provide a “growing groundswell that will be encouraging for the radical movements like the disabled people’s movement”.“The concerns are rising,” he says. “My concern is how long it will take, how much damage will be done in the meantime.”Beresford believes that the most important question is “how we look after each other in modern society”.“This government has pretended that we can do that on our own and that really the issue is all these people claiming rights and income they are not entitled to.”But he does not advocate a return to the “old paternalism” of the post-war welfare state, which “failed to involve people, was top-down, and failed to understand diversity”.Instead, his book points towards a future welfare state that is “financially and environmentally sustainable”, that is “participatory”, where “social rights and needs guide economic policy”, and in which “supporting each other is recognised as a productive creator of real wealth, personal and collective well-being”.If this is to be achieved, he says, the disabled people’s movement has to highlight “not only the bad things that are happening now but the good things it has to offer, and show non-disabled people what disabled people can offer in a much more systematic way”.He also wants to see user-led organisations build more alliances.“We have got to be outward-looking as movements, we have got to collaborate more, we have got to be more tolerant of each other’s differences, we have got to really work on addressing diversity in our activities.”But he feels “optimistic” for the future, as long as disabled people and their organisations work “in concert” with others.“People listen to people with shared understanding and experience, people like them,” he says. “We must show that commonality.”He is convinced that the values represented by the disabled people’s movement and user-led organisations will win through.The values that he says have been imposed on society – individualism, fighting each other, greed and criminality – “seem immensely powerful, but they don’t stand up to investigation”.Instead, what ordinary people want are “traditional values about treating people with respect and not discriminating”.“They are the things that the disabled people’s movement, the other movements and user-led organisations are fighting for,” he says. “They are eternal values and those values will out.”last_img read more

Liberal Democrats have voted for a new social secu

first_imgLiberal Democrats have voted for a new social security policy that will scrap the “fitness for work” test and all benefit sanctions, despite many disabled party members calling for a more radical approach to welfare reform.The vote at the party’s annual conference in Brighton (pictured) means that scrapping the work capability assessment (WCA), all benefit sanctions, the personal independence payment (PIP) 20-metre rule, the bedroom tax and the benefit cap are all now party policy.Members were voting on a policy paper that called on the party to devolve the provision of employment support to local authorities, which would also be asked to deliver – or contract out – the eligibility test that replaces the WCA.This replacement test would introduce a “real world” element into the assessment of eligibility for out-of-work disability benefits.The policy paper, Mending The Safety Net, called for the benefit sanctions system to be reformed so there was “greater scope for discretion with a stronger safety net to prevent sanctions causing extreme hardship”.But party members voted strongly in favour of an amendment that said benefits sanctions were “fundamentally wrong and leave people destitute who are already in poverty”, and should be replaced with a scheme that provides claimants with incentives to engage with the system, rather than punishing them when they do not.The motion, as amended by the call to scrap sanctions, was carried by 363 to 202 votes, and now becomes party policy.Before the vote there were suggestions that some disabled activists may quit the party if the motion was carried, because they did not believe the policy paper put enough distance between the Liberal Democrats and their former coalition partners in the Conservative party.But so far that does not appear to have happened.The disabled Liberal Democrat peer Baroness [Celia] Thomas, the party’s new work and pensions spokeswoman, told the conference that the policy paper was “thoroughly well thought out” and “an innovative, practical and humane roadmap for the sort of welfare system we want in this country”.She said: “Don’t be fooled into thinking that this makes the paper just tinkering at the edges of the current system.“It is not just tinkering, it is the most radical plan I have ever seen for welfare reform.”She said the “real world test” that would replace the WCA was based on a pioneering system in the Netherlands, and she added: “It will help to ensure that claimants are not put through impossible hoops for non-existent jobs.”Jennie Rigg, who chairs Calderdale Liberal Democrats, spoke against the motion, saying that benefit sanctions were “unjustifiable, inhumane and immoral” while the motion was “fundamentally flawed” and “mired in coalition policy-think”.She said that devolving assessments to local level was “not going to make them any better”.After the vote, she said on Twitter that the new policy was “tinkering at the edges of the benefit system and keeping most of the Tory bull***t in place” and that she was “utterly devastated that lib dems voted for it”.Ryan Mercer, the party’s candidate to fight Putney at the next general election, speaking against the motion, told the debate: “We don’t need to mend this broken safety net, we need to replace it with something far more ambitious.”Lib Dem activist Sarah Noble, also arguing against the motion, said: “We must be forward-thinking, not sliding backwards into this coalition-think.“We need a radical alternative to our failed and discriminatory welfare system. This isn’t it.”Dr Kirsten Johnson, who proposed the sanctions amendment, told the conference that the sanctions system was “inhumane”, and added: “We must, we must, we must scrap benefit sanctions. It is the moral and it is the decent thing to do.”But Lord [Jonny] Oates, who was Nick Clegg’s chief of staff throughout the coalition, and is the party’s former director of policy and communications, argued against scrapping sanctions.Lord Oates, who served on the working group that drew up the policy paper, said that it proposed “radical changes” to sanctions that would allow “greater flexibility and discretion”, and added: “If we reject sanctions… the public will think we have gone mad.”Matthew Clark, a disabled party member making his first speech at conference, who supported the motion, said the Tory benefits system was “creating a sticky web, trapping and entrenching vulnerable people who can be and deserve better”.He said he had “wasted valuable time not developing myself but learning how to jump through hoops” to secure the support he needed, while he said he had faced a “long battle” to regain his benefits after they were removed, in what he said was a “centralised and impersonal” system.He said that many disabled people feared the “complex” benefits system and were afraid to even ask simple questions of DWP in case they were sanctioned.But he opposed calls to scrap sanctions completely and backed a failed bid, through another amendment, to retain the benefit cap at a level equal to average household earnings.Former Lib Dem MP Jenny Willott, who chaired the working group, said she was “very proud” of the policy paper, which she said had “strong policies and a Liberal heart” and was “radical” and would “enable us to campaign for a fairer benefits system now”.She said that one of the “most important and bold measures” was the scrapping of the WCA.Arguing against banning sanctions completely, she said that some charities had told the working group that placing conditions on receiving benefits “can have a role in ensuring vulnerable people engage”.George Potter, the disabled activist who was a member of the working group that drew up the paper, and was a key critic of the impact of austerity policies on disabled people while the party was in coalition, told Disability News Service (DNS) after the debate that he was “disappointed that the motion went through, even though it has been amended to commit us to abolishing sanctions”.He said: “It doesn’t go anywhere near far enough in tackling the failure of the welfare system around disability issues or to offer a coherent vision for the future of the welfare system generally.“However, the reactions from the floor during the debate make me optimistic that there is plenty of appetite for this topic to be revisited at a future conference and I’m now going to be working with a broad coalition of party members to bring something better to a future conference.“In the meantime, I’m at least glad that the party has accepted the principle of scrapping the WCA and sanctions – it’s encouraging that at least we’re moving on from this idea that welfare should be about punishing people for non-compliance with arbitrary, bureaucratic regulations.”Among the reforms he had wanted to see was for both ESA and PIP to be scrapped, and replaced with a disability pension for those unable to work, which would provide them with a decent income – similar to the system in Germany – and a new additional living costs benefit for disabled people.He said this would focus more on providing the necessary support for disabled people and less on how to ration it.last_img read more