All articles about 上海水磨会所2019价格

Hostility towards ethnic people breaks all records Santu Larma

first_imgSantu Larma addressing a press conference on Saturday. Photo: Prothom AloThere has been no remedy to the violation of human rights of the indigenous communities, said president of Bangladesh Indigenous Peoples’ Forum Jyotirindra Bodhipriya Larma, popularly known as Santu Larma.”The state’s irresponsibility and hostility towards them have broken all previous records. The existence of the indigenous people is threatened,” alleged Santu Larma while addressing a press conference at a hotel in the capital on Saturday.The press conference was organised on the occasion of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples on 9 August.The leader of indigenous people said the government claims that the country has seen a wave of development, but millions of people, including ethnic people, poor farmers and labourers, are being washed away by this so-called development, he added.He said the government did nothing despite in landslides killing 131 people and affecting 20,000 families in the Chittagong Hill Tracts.Santu Larma said around 15000 people were starving in Sajek of Khagrachhari, 10000 tonnes of rice was needed, but the government remains indifferent.Santu Larma announced various programmes to mark 9 August. He said educationist professor Muhammed Zafar Iqbal will inaugurate the main event at Central Shaheed Minar while civil aviation and tourism minister Rashed Khan Menon will attend it as chief guest. Functions to mark the day will be organised in the districts where the ethnic people live.Oikya NAP president Pankaj Bhattacharya alleged that an attempt was on to wipe out the existence of indigenous people from the country. He terms this attitude as a collapse in the spirit of democracy and the spirit of the liberation war.Researcher columnist Syed Abul Maksud said, “Not only indigenous people, no one is in fine, except pro-Awami League people. The country does not only belong to the pro-AL people. We fought together to liberate the country.”Professor of Dhaka University Mesbah Kamal said the state does not recognise the existence of indigenous people. The election commission declares regional political parties will not be allowed to participate in the election, he said, adding that in the neighbouring country such parties participated in the elections and formed the government.Kamal called upon the EC to allow all parties including Parbatya Chattagram Jana Sanghati Samity to participate in the election.Indigenous Peoples’ Forum member secretary Sanjib Drang moderated the press conference addressed by human rights activist Numan Ahmed Khan, and organising secretaries of indigenous peoples’ forum Saktipad Tripura and Rabindra Saren.last_img read more

ASK demands probe into BCL attack on quota reformists

first_img.Ain O Salish Kendra (ASK), a rights body, has urged the government to investigate the attacks on the quota reformists by Bangladesh Chhatra League (BCL) activists and to release Rashed Khan, joint convener of Bangladesh General Students Rights Protection Council immediately.It made the demand in a statement issued on Sunday.The statement signed by ASK executive director Sheepa Hafiza said, “On Saturday morning, at least 10 leaders of the central committee of the council were injured in an attack by some BCL men on the DU campus. Police arrested Rashed in a case filed by a BCL leader which is very regrettable.”It also criticised the silence of the Dhaka University (DU) administration over the attack and its failure to control it.Terming the BCL attack on students ‘unacceptable’, the rights body asked the government to identify the attackers immediately and mete out exemplary punishment to them.last_img read more

DC Association of Parliamentarians Celebrates Parliamentary Law Day

first_imgThe District of Columbia Association of Parliamentarians is celebrating its 46th Annual Parliamentary Law Day Observance. The forum will be held at the Washington Navy Yard Catering and Conference Center, Building 211, on, Oct. 25 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.The event will feature two presenters: Darlene T. Allen, Professional Registered Parliamentarian and the National Parliamentarian Association, Director of District Two who will bring both local and national information.   Following a lunch, John D. Stackpole, Ph.D., Professional Registered Parliamentarian and Certified Professional Parliamentarian will conduct a “Voting on a Three Way Decision” workshop.last_img

Tiny robot swarm able to play tunes on a virtual piano w

first_img Kilobots bring us one step closer to a robot swarm © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Tiny robot swarm able to play tunes on a virtual piano (w/ video) (2012, November 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-tiny-robot-swarm-tunes-virtual.html (Phys.org)—Researchers at Georgia Tech’s Georgia Robots and InTelligent Systems (GRITS) Laboratory have succeeded in programming a swarm of very tiny robots to figure out for themselves how to go about playing a tune on a virtual piano displayed on a flat plane. One of the robots is the leader, and knows the tune and where a robot needs to be to create the notes that make up the tune; that information is conveyed to the other robots that make up the swarm, and the result is the playing of the familiar classical tune, Beethoven’s “Fur Elise.” More information: gritslab.gatech.edu/home/2011/ … er-follower-control/ Explore further With swarming, individual members take actions based on the location and actions of those around them. With this new research, the objective was to cause individual members of the swarm to appear at a certain location on the virtual keyboard at a certain time to cause the playing of a note; necessary ingredients to create music. The catch though, was that only one of them, the designated leader, was “told” what those data points were beforehand. Thus, the leader had to convey to the other bots where they needed to be and when. The team added some other elements to the goal to increase the difficulty of the assignment, which should theoretically help in learning more about how to program swarms. They wanted the bots to use the fewest number of themselves possible to play a song together, based on the tempo of the song (and to use the shortest routes possible all while avoiding collisions). If a song is played slow enough, for example, it could be performed by one little robot racing across the virtual keyboard (or by a person using just one finger perhaps on a real piano). As the tempo picks up, it becomes impossible for one bot to get the next note in time for the song to play correctly, thus another bot is added, starting a swarm.What’s remarkable about the playing bots is that the leader doesn’t just tell every other bot where it’s supposed to be, instead, it conveys information to those nearest to it, which in turn convey information to those nearest them, and so on. In this way, each robot is able to work out for itself where it is supposed to be and when – which is how it’s supposed to be, because that’s how swarming works in the natural world. The robots, called Khepera bots by the team, are very small, just 5.5 centimeters across their thimble shaped bodies. Each has a host of sensors, including in their little hats and antenna and two wheels to allow for moving around. The whole idea is to create swarming behavior that mimics that seen in nature with birds, fish, etc.last_img read more