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JTBs Philip Rose says until next time as he leaves Canadian market

first_img Share Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> TORONTO — When Philip Rose took over as Regional Director, Canada for the Jamaica Tourist Board seven years ago, he came here from the U.S. “and I had all my big ideas. I quickly learned that Canada is a very unique market with nuances that cannot be overlooked.”Rose is leaving the JTB’s Canadian office for a new post with the tourism board, an appointment he says he’ll be able to announce in the next couple of weeks. He starts his new role in the new year, and meanwhile a new Regional Director will be announced for the Canadian market.Does Rose have any advice for the incoming new Regional Director? “Ask questions. Listen. Trust the team. And trust the partners,” he says.Asked what he’s most proud of, looking back on his 7 years heading up the Canadian market, Rose singles out his Canadian team: “I’m especially proud of how active, how professional my team has been here.” And, he adds, he’s proud of all the extra airlift to Jamaica.When Rose took over the post seven years ago, the Canadian dollar was starting to decline after a run at-par, prices to Jamaica had gone up and capacity had gone down. “It was like ‘Welcome to Canada, Philip’,” he jokes.More news:  Onex paying big to get WestJet and that will send airfares soaring, says CWT“All of our partners rallied together and went to the market and our numbers started to rise.”Over the 7 years, “we’ve done remarkably well,” says Rose.More importantly than the increase in visitor numbers from the Canadian market, Rose and his JTB have also put in place new strategies that will ensure ongoing visitor satisfaction levels with the Jamaica travel experience remain high, and return rates stay high as well. “We’re not only interested in the numbers increasing from Canada, but also customer satisfaction,” he says.He adds: “We firmly believe one of the reasons for our high return rate is that we take the time and invest the resources to ensure our retail partners have the tools to make sure their clients are in the resort that’s right for them.”Rose says he wants to thank everyone in the industry for all the support over the years. “I have made some incredible friends here, both in the industry and in the community. I will miss you all! Canada has been good not only to me, but to my family too. We have been proud to call Canada home for seven wonderful years, and we are truly going to miss it…other than the Toronto traffic and winters, of course,” he jokes.More news:  Consolidation in the cruise industry as PONANT set to acquire Paul Gauguin CruisesRose officially ends his stint as Regional Director, Canada for the JTB on Dec. 15 – “just before the brutally cold temperatures”.Seven years ago Rose arrived in Canada from Texas, where he was in charge of the Western USA market. Is he headed back to the U.S. in his new JTB role? Time will tell but if it’s another cold climate, he’ll be well-prepared, thanks to the lessons he learned here in Canada: “I now wear a toque as opposed to a hat.” Monday, December 3, 2018 center_img Travelweek Group JTB’s Philip Rose says ‘until next time’ as he leaves Canadian market after 7 years Tags: Departures, Jamaica, JTBlast_img read more

Congressman Calls for Regulatory Transparency from the CFPB

first_img U.S. Rep. French Hill (R-Arkansas) said Monday that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) needs to do a lot more to ensure the industry understand the new TRID-compliant ‘Know Before You Owe’ rules before they take effect. Specifically, Hill wants to make sure that the Bureau clears up confusing language regarding insurance fees in the mortgage process.Hill, addressing more than 250 attendees during Monday’s Federal Conference & Lobby Day, urged CFPB to correct “the inaccurate disclosure of title insurance fees when policies are issued simultaneously.” Because of the regulation, Hill said, consumers in over half of the United States receive confusing information about their title insurance costs on the new mortgage disclosures.“Informal guidance is of no value,” he said. “The lack of formal direction from the CFPB has resulted in uncertainty on how to interpret the rules. We need transparency so we can ensure consumers receive the peace of mind they deserve when buying a home or refinancing a mortgage. The CFPB needs to make sure it provides the detail before going retail with Know Before You Owe.”October 3 marks the day when CFPB will require mortgage servicers to provide a five-page closing disclosure document to all borrowers, and to make sure that those borrowers know what they’re getting into before their mortgages formally close.The proactive news is that most mortgagees are already giving clients these kinds of documents, well ahead of schedule. In fact, a recent survey by the American Land Title Association (ALTA) found that 92 percent of borrowers are reviewing their closing documents ahead of time and are being counseled by servicers in the process.Still, more formal leadership from the feds is key, according to Hill. Last year, Hill, House Financial Services Committee leadership, and industry representatives cautioned CFPB that Know Before You Owe could have unintended negative consequences on homebuyers unless there is clearer guidance and language geared towards helping the general public.For its part, ALTA is delighted that Hill is taking such forward action on the matter. Michelle Korsmo, ALTA’s chief executive officer, said that her company’s primary goal for the Know Before You Owe rules come into formal play is “ensuring consumers receive clear information about their title insurance costs on mortgage disclosures.”She added that the current mortgage closing disclosure calculation is “inconsistent with the Bureau’s mission to inform consumers about the true costs of their real estate transaction.” We are thankful for Rep. Hill’s commitment to push the Bureau to provide more clarity on TRID to make sure the rule is transparent, practical, and accurate.” Congressman Calls for Regulatory Transparency from the CFPB May 17, 2016 501 Views in Daily Dose, Government, Headlines, Newscenter_img CFPB Congressman French Hill Regulation Title Insurance TRID 2016-05-17 Scott_Morgan Sharelast_img read more

In This Issue… The dollar loosens it grip Jo

first_imgIn This Issue… * The dollar loosens it grip * Jobs market continued to improve * Investors testing Norges * A rate hike in the cards And, Now, Today’s Pfennig For Your Thoughts! Clear as mud… Good day…and a Fabulous Friday to one and all. This will take care of my call from the bullpen for now, so Chris will have the ball for the next couple of weeks until Chuck returns at the end of the month. The summer time heat finally loosened its grip on St. Louis yesterday and the dollar strength which had a tight hold in the markets earlier in the week saw some pullback. We didn’t see much action in the overnight markets Thursday morning so everything was fairly flat when I sat down at my desk. The dollar buying frenzy did subside, but we didn’t see a total reversal that would offset the damage from Tuesday and Wednesday. I guess you could say the US dollar party got a warning for being a little too loud but it hasn’t gotten broken up just yet. I think the novelty of the Fed statements have started to wear away and investors are looking for more confirmation that QE3 really has been relegated back to the basement and additional data before they go much further. That’s not to say we could see some safe haven buying here and there, but I think it would be a while before the Fed could officially rule out additional stimulus measures. With that being said, we could see more emphasis placed on the US economic reports over the next couple of months as investors try and gauge where things actually stand, with the caveat that problems in Europe don’t flare up. While data has seen improvement in certain areas, there hasn’t been enough, in my opinion, to demonstrate the economy has the traction to carry on without the safety net of government stimulus. We did have several reports to talk about from yesterday morning, so let’s jump right in. Starting with the producer price index, wholesale inflation, the annualized figure did fall, as expected, in February to 3.3%, from the previous reading of 4.1%, and marked the slowest year over year gain since 2010. We saw the same thing with the cost of imported goods as the annual figure dropped lower, however, the monthly figure for both PPI and the import index gave us much higher readings than the previous reports. In fact, wholesale prices rose 0.4% from January and reflected the highest increase in five months. The Labor Department prints three monthly inflation reports, two of which we’ve already seen, so today we see the final gauge of inflation for February through the consumer price index. The CPI numbers are expected to fall in line with the other reports by showing no year over year inflation but is expected to show a monthly increase. The headline CPI number is expected to rise 0.4% in February, but core inflation is forecast to remain flat. The only problem with the core calculation is that both food and energy are taken out of the equation, which happens to be the two most frequently used consumer products. When the Fed stated oil will push up inflation temporarily, it’ll be interesting to see just how temporary this scenario plays out, especially if demand really does pick up. Moving over to the employment side of things, the jobs environment demonstrated another week of a step in the right direction as initial jobless claims fell to 351k, the lowest level in four years, from last week’s upward revision to 365k. The four week moving average, which is typically a less volatile figure, held firm at just under 356k. The number of people collecting unemployment benefits, which doesn’t include extended benefits, decreased to 3.34 million. With employment continuing to head in the right direction, the Bloomberg consumer comfort report yielded the highest level since March 2008. The equity markets have been on the rise over the past several months, so seeing positive returns on those portfolio statements also goes a long way in making someone feel a little better. The U. of Michigan confidence report will be released this morning so I’m sure we’ll see another pickup in the happy factor. The TIC flows, which measures international demand for longer term US financial instruments, surged in January to $101 billion. The markets used to pay attention and actually consider this a must see report, but the Fed pretty much threw water all over it when they kicked the printing presses into high gear. Anyway, thoughts of whether Greece would default or get another bailout spurred the safe haven movement into US Treasuries so that pretty much explains the rise. Other than that, nothing new as China and Japan still own over $2 trillion worth of Treasuries combined. Rounding out the remaining data reports from yesterday, the regional manufacturing figures both increased to multi-month highs and points to a rise in the national report, the ISM, which is due on April 2. The other reports that I haven’t touched on include industrial production and capacity utilization. If the secondary manufacturing reports and other indications hold true, we should see improvement in both figures. Looking ahead to next week, it’s shaping up to be a fairly slow week in the data department as it will pretty much be dominated by February housing numbers. As I mentioned earlier, the US dollar lost ground yesterday even though we had some positive economic numbers that could have kept the rally going. It looks like investors were willing to again venture out into the riskier asset arena as equities rose along with the major currencies. The trend that’s been in place for quite some time, which consists of positive US or global economic news promotes a weaker dollar, was back in the ring. I’m sure some of the cheaper prices, namely in gold and silver, enticed investors to get off the couch. The New Zealand dollar topped the charts by turning in a nearly 1.25% performance. An increase in February manufacturing to almost a two year high gave the kiwi an extra shot and gave investors a reason to pick up the currency at a seven week low. We’re starting to see better economic data coming out of New Zealand, but the much larger economy from Australia often casts a shadow they can’t escape. The Swiss franc remained near the top of the currency returns leader board yesterday by gaining just over 1%. The SNB, Swiss National Bank, met yesterday and kept interest rates on hold as expected. There wasn’t any earth shattering news surrounding the meeting, but they did express a more upbeat attitude regarding the economy. The SNB raised its growth forecast for this year by predicting GDP will rise 0.8%, instead of the previous estimate of 0.5%, and pushed away the prospects of a recession. The SNB also reiterated they will defend the 1.20 per euro ceiling that was established in September with the utmost determination. They don’t want to appear overly optimistic and attract too much attention, so continuing to fly under the radar is where policy makers would like to stay. While 4th quarter GDP and investor confidence has risen recently, the central bank is still concerned about deflation derailing the recent economic stabilization. One of the statements from the SNB explained that while the high value of the franc continues to present enormous challenges to the economy, the minimum exchange rate is having an impact. They went on to say the ceiling has reduced the extreme exchange rate volatility and has given business leaders a better basis for planning. In the end, any currency appreciation will be met with government intervention and economic policy changes look to be a long ways down the road, so there’s no reason to spend much time here in the foreseeable future. The Norwegian krone, interestingly enough, finished in the top five after its dismal performance on Wednesday. They did report a record trade surplus in February as rising oil prices boosted exports, but it looks as though speculators were trying to crack the code as the government’s pain threshold on currency gains. The central bank indicated after the rate cut on Wednesday they intend on keeping rates on hold for the rest of the year unless justified otherwise. Policy makers indicated on Wednesday they don’t defend a specific krone level and that interest rate policy will only respond to the extent that the exchange rate affects the inflation outlook. Most of the currencies had solid returns yesterday anyway so I’m not so sure that speculators trying to break the central bank’s resolve was the prime player. Nonetheless, these were some of the news headlines floating around yesterday and had some investors thinking about another Swiss type of situation. The Canadian dollar didn’t have the same returns as New Zealand or Norway, but it did remain in positive territory and got close to breaking back into the $1.01 handle. On the data side of the table, existing home sales in February rose 1.4% and the average home price climbed 2%. We also saw a Canadian consumer confidence poll rise to its highest level in a year. The higher oil prices and positive US data are starting to feed through to the Canadian economy, not to mention two fundamental pillars of strength which include a commodity based economy and a healthy fiscal position. As I was sifting through the news last night, I saw a story that traders now have over a 50% chance that we could see a rate hike by year end. That scenario might be a stretch given the Bank of Canada likes to follow in the Fed’s footsteps when it comes to rate decisions, but just seeing that thought kicked around says a lot about the Canadian economy. Gold and silver saw some renewed life yesterday as they both traded up around 1% throughout the day. Since they have gotten beat up this week, it looks like the buying on dips crowd were stirring around and scooped up the metals at cheaper prices. I also saw where physical gold demand from India yesterday was the highest level since January of last year, so I’m sure that helped as well. As I came in this morning, the overnight markets didn’t really give us any solid direction as everything traded in a fairly tight range. If anything, the dollar has strengthened this morning but nothing to write home about. There weren’t any global economic reports that held any market moving weight, but we did see a measure of European exports rise for a third month in January. If we look back to December and January, the euro was under some selling pressure from the Greek related anxieties so I’m sure that went a long way helping exporters with a cheaper euro. Then there was this… Evidence of a global economic recovery is real, but the level of optimism it has created deserves skepticism, according to The Economist. Growth is likely to be slower this year than last. In the U.S., stimulus should focus on higher wages, affordable housing, increased health care spending, and pensions. “If policymakers get it wrong again, the recovery could yet turn to dust,” the magazine notes. To recap…The dollar couldn’t keep the party going as most of the major currencies appreciated throughout the day. Consumer confidence displayed another rise as the labor market continues to show life. We saw another drop in the initial jobless claims figure and regional manufacturing reports continue to show improvement. The New Zealand dollar rose against the dollar as domestic manufacturing increased to a two year high and the SNB kept rates on hold while reiterating their commitment to the currency ceiling. The Norwegian krone appreciated despite Wednesday’s rate cut and the odds of a rate hike in Canada increased to over 50%. Currencies today. American Style: A$ $1.0529, kiwi .8184, C$ $1.0064, euro 1.3053, sterling 1.5728, Swiss $1.0811, . European Style: rand 7.6424, krone 5.7910, SEK 6.8088, forint 223.79, zloty 3.1641, koruna 18.8008, RUB 29.40, yen 83.72, sing 1.2623, HKD 7.7636, INR 50.3025, China 6.3229, pesos 12.6874, BRL 1.7983, Dollar Index 80.37, Oil $105.20, 10-year 2.31%, Silver $32.42, and Gold. $1,648.18 That’s it for today…I’ll be glued to the tv this weekend with all of the college basketball games, but my focus will be centered this afternoon when the Missouri Tigers hit the court. We also have St. Patrick’s Day this weekend so top o’ the morning to all that have Irish heritage. I have some Irish blood, so maybe I’ll enjoy a green beverage or two on Saturday, but you wouldn’t guess it be looking at me. You would probably think my holiday of choice would be Columbus Day as my Italian features are fairly prominent. Since I have both nationalities running through my veins, I guess I’m set either way. That’s it for me today and Chris will be back in the saddle on Monday, so until next time…Have a Great Day!! Mike Meyer Assistant Vice President EverBank World Markets 1-800-926-4922 1-314-647-3837 www.everbank.comlast_img read more

Click on image to enlarge The Comex Daily Deli

first_img (Click on image to enlarge) The Comex Daily Delivery Report showed that 99 gold and 243 silver contracts were posted for delivery on Tuesday within the Comex-approved depositories.  In gold, it was ‘all the usual suspects’.  In silver, the two big short/issuers were JPMorgan Chase and ABN Amro with 120 and 111 contracts respectively.  The biggest long/stoppers were Canada’s own Bank of Nova Scotia with 168 contracts…and then JPMorgan Chase with 59 contracts.  The link to yesterday’s Issuers and Stoppers Report is here. There were no reported changes in GLD yesterday but, once again, the big surprise came from SLV, where an authorized participant added 1,691,162 troy ounces of silver…and is virtually the same size of deposit that was made into SLV on Thursday…almost to the ounce, so I’m wondering if this was an double entry error.  We’ll find out for sure on Monday if/when they revise their number. Over at Switzerland’s Zürcher Kantonalbank for the period ending March 21st…they reported that their gold ETF declined by a tiny 8,017 troy ounces…and their silver ETF declined by 200,557 troy ounces during the same period. The U.S. Mint had a smallish report.  They sold only 500 ounces of gold eagles…along with 1,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes.  Month-to-date the mint has sold 45,500 ounces of gold eagles…10,000 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes…and 2,438,000 silver eagles.  Based on these numbers, the silver/gold sales ratio for the month so far is a hair under 44 to 1…which is pretty amazing…and I hope you’re getting your share. Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Thursday, they reported receiving 945,922 troy ounces of silver…and shipped 369,222 troy ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that activity is here. The Commitment of Traders Report was a surprise.  Silver showed a big improvement in the Commercial net short position…and gold showed a big deterioration in its Commercial net short position. In silver, the Commercial net short position declined by 14.9 million ounces…and as of the Tuesday cut-off stands at 132.2 million ounces. Once the market-neutral spread trades are subtracted out of the total open interest, the Big 4 traders are short 38.8% of the entire Comex silver market on a ‘net’ basis.  The ‘5 through 8’ traders are short an additional 11.6 percentage points on a net basis.  Add them up and the Big 8 are short 50.4% of the entire Comex silver market…and that’s a minimum percentage. In gold, the Commercial net short position increased by a whopping 2.02 million ounces…blowing out to 16.24 million ounces.  But the ‘good’ news, as Ted Butler pointed out to me on the phone yesterday, was that there was no increase in the short position of the ‘Big 8’ traders…which includes the BIG 3…JPMorgan, Canada’s Bank of Nova Scotia…and HSBC USA.  All of the increase was the result of the smaller Commercial traders selling some of their long positions for a profit. On a ‘net’ basis the Big 4 traders Commercial traders are short 25.4% of the entire Comex gold market…and the ‘5 through 8’ traders are short an additional 13.7 percentage points of the gold market.  So the Big 8 are short 39.1% of the entire Comex gold market on a ‘net’ basis. In terms of troy ounces held short, the Big 8 are short 13.97 million ounces of gold…which represents 86.0% of the Commercial net short position in that metal.  In silver, the Big 8 are short 264.4 million ounces…and that amount of silver represents 200.0% of the Commercial net short position. Looking at the numbers in the previous paragraph it’s easy to see that, compared to silver, gold appears to be almost a free market…which it isn’t, as the gold market is also rigged seven ways to heaven. Here’s Nick Laird’s incomparable “Days of World Production to Cover Comex Short Positions” chart as of the March 19th cut-off. Silver opened virtually on its high of the day at the beginning of Far East trading on Friday…and was down about twenty cents to the $29 spot price just minutes before 8:30 a.m. in New York. Less than ten minutes later, the price had cratered by about 40 cents…and from there, the price pattern was almost identical to gold’s, with the only minor difference being the fact that the absolute low tick [$28.45 spot] came on a quick spike down at 12:15 p.m. Eastern time. Silver closed at $28.76 spot…down 42 cents from Thursday.  Gross volume was pretty decent at around 42,500 contracts. Despite the fact that gold got smacked pretty good earlier in the day, the gold stocks rallied into positive territory by shortly after 10:00 a.m. in New York.  Then, shortly after that, someone came along and sold the gold stocks off a percent…with the low of the day coming around 11:30 a.m. Eastern time.  From that point, the stocks rallied back slowly, and the HUI finished down 0.73%. Needless to say, the silver stocks didn’t exactly shine yesterday…as virtually all of them finished in the red.  But they did follow almost the same price path as the gold stocks.  Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Seven Index closed down 1.17%. (Click on image to enlarge) Here’s a series of three photos that my daughter Kathleen sent me yesterday.  What is it with cats and boxes?  And it obviously doesn’t matter about the size of the cat…domestic or otherwise! (Click on image to enlarge) Here’s Nick’s Silver Seven index which shows the longer term. With the obvious exception of the first story, it’s pretty much wall-to-wall stories about Cyprus for you today….and they’re mostly presented in the order I received them yesterday.  These stories seem to change by the hour…and it will be interesting to see how this all turns out. There are no market anymore…only interventions. – Chris Powell, GATA Today’s pop ‘blast from the past’ takes me back to my last year in high school in 1966.  This ‘Go-Go’ tune got seemingly endless air time when it was first released…and it’s still a classic to this day.  The group was basically a one-hit wonder…but what a hit it was!  It’s old enough that the youtube.com video clip is in black in white.  I hope you enjoy it…and the link is here. Today’s classical selection is a tone poem by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. The Swan of Tuonela was originally composed in 1893 as the prelude to a projected opera called The Building of the Boat. Sibelius revised it two years later as the second of the four sections of the Lemminkäinen Suite (Lemminkäis-sarja), also known as the Four Legends from the Kalevala, Op. 22, which was premiered in 1896. Sibelius revised the tone poem twice, once in 1897 and again in 1900. Here’s the Norwegian Radio Orchestra under the baton of Avi Ostrowsky. This recording is as good as it gets…as is the divine playing of the cor angl’e soloist.  The link is here. Enjoy. Well, it was another case of JPMorgan et al moving the markets because they could…not because there were any fundamental changes in supply and demand in both gold and silver.  If you take a quick peek at platinum and palladium, their chart patterns were unscathed yesterday. As I mentioned earlier this week, “da boyz” can move these market any which way they want…as there are no adults in charge anymore…either at the CFTC or in the mining companies.  Gold seems to have topped out just above the $1,600 price mark for the moment…and silver is safely back under the $29 spot price mark.  Where these markets go from here is unknown, but whatever direction we go in, will have nothing to do with real supply and demand fundamentals. That’s all I have for today.  As I mentioned at the top of this column, I’ll be out of town for a large portion of next week…and I can absolutely guarantee that the columns I post while gone, will be much shorter. I await the Sunday night opening in New York with some degree of interest. As I mentioned earlier this week, “da boyz” can move these market any which way they want NOTE:  I will be on the road most of next week…and will be writing my column on my laptop, which is an ordeal that I put myself through as few times a year as possible.  They will also be as short as I can make them…and the ‘Critical Reads’ section will shrink alarmingly during this time period. The gold price didn’t do a lot for most of the trading day in the Far East on Friday, but starting around 3:00 p.m. Hong Kong time, the price developed a negative bias…and shortly before 1:00 p.m. in London, the decline began more severe.  About forty minutes later…shortly after 8:30 a.m. in New York, it had hit its low tick of the day, which Kitco reported as $1,602.80 spot. The subsequent rally lasted until 10:15…and the price sagged a bit from there until shortly before 2:00 p.m. Eastern.  The gold price gained a couple of dollars from there going into the 5:15 p.m. electronic close. In actual fact, it was all a tempest in a teapot, as volume was very light once again yesterday…around 84,000 contracts net, the same as Thursday’s volume.  The gold price closed at $1,609.20 spot…down $5.60 on the day. I couldn’t help but notice that Friday’s silver price path was almost a mirror image of the Thursday price pattern, which is hardly a coincidence I would think. The dollar index opened at 82.86 in early Far East trading on their Friday morning…and more or less traded flat until shortly after 8:30 a.m. in London.  From there it rolled over a hair…and headed south.  The absolute low tick came moments before noon in New York…and then didn’t do much after that…closing the day at 82.37…down 49 basis points from the Thursday close. Once again there was absolutely no correlation between what the dollar index was doing…and what was going on in the Comex paper markets in gold and silver. Sponsor Advertisement 2013 – A Breakout Year for Energy? The energy sector is a volatile market, but it can provide enormous gains to investors who know what they’re doing – and now is the time to get into the two most promising energy trends for 2013 and beyond. Top energy analyst Marin Katusa tells you what you should be bullish and bearish on this year in his special report, The 2013 Energy Forecast. Read it here for free.last_img read more

Userled and disabled peoples organisations hold

first_imgUser-led and disabled people’s organisations hold the key to fighting back against the government’s long-term assault on the welfare state, according to a leading disabled academic.In his new book, All Our Welfare: Towards Participatory Social Policy, Professor Peter Beresford argues that service-user and disabled people’s organisations (DPOs) “offer a force for achieving change” and for moving towards a “future sustainable welfare state”.Beresford (pictured), who chairs Shaping Our Lives, the national network of disabled people and service users, says in his book that the new identity movements of the 1970s – such as the disabled people’s movement – developed new ways of thinking.They offered new ideas and models of support, and more equal methods of research; and they developed co-operatives, and focused on environmental sustainability and the importance of meeting people’s needs and rights.But faced with a dominant right-wing media and politics, they survived only as an “undercurrent”.Now, he says, the disabled people’s movement, which overcame “massive struggles” to develop its own pioneering, user-led services, can provide the foundation for a new “revisioned” welfare state, pushing back against the current media and political forces that want to marginalise the idea of welfare.“I don’t see any other progressive way forward,” he told Disability News Service (DNS). “If we don’t manage to have that then I fear for where this country will be heading.”He believes that successive governments have performed a “conjuring trick”, by transforming the welfare state – which historically has included services such as the NHS, social care, education and social housing – to simply mean welfare benefits.“The welfare state, according to this government, is now ‘welfare’,” he says, “which means ‘people getting benefits that you are paying for, who are scum.’ That’s how they are presenting it.”But Beresford, who is professor of citizen participation at the University of Essex and emeritus professor at Brunel University, is convinced that the seeds of the downfall of the government’s right-wing, anti-welfare state approach have already been sown.“It’s difficult to be optimistic in terms of how many terrible things are going to continue to happen,” he told DNS, “but I don’t see it is a sustainable road of travel in where we are headed, I really don’t.”He believes that younger people will feel more and more beleaguered by the prospect of huge higher education debts, and having to find the money to cope with job insecurity and – if the welfare state continues to be whittled away – healthcare, pensions and social care.Young families with disabled children “will not tolerate what people tolerated 20, 30, 50 years ago; they want a life for their children; they see their children as like anybody else”.And older people, he says, now worry about their grandchildren, and where their jobs will come from, and where they will live.He believes these factors will provide a “growing groundswell that will be encouraging for the radical movements like the disabled people’s movement”.“The concerns are rising,” he says. “My concern is how long it will take, how much damage will be done in the meantime.”Beresford believes that the most important question is “how we look after each other in modern society”.“This government has pretended that we can do that on our own and that really the issue is all these people claiming rights and income they are not entitled to.”But he does not advocate a return to the “old paternalism” of the post-war welfare state, which “failed to involve people, was top-down, and failed to understand diversity”.Instead, his book points towards a future welfare state that is “financially and environmentally sustainable”, that is “participatory”, where “social rights and needs guide economic policy”, and in which “supporting each other is recognised as a productive creator of real wealth, personal and collective well-being”.If this is to be achieved, he says, the disabled people’s movement has to highlight “not only the bad things that are happening now but the good things it has to offer, and show non-disabled people what disabled people can offer in a much more systematic way”.He also wants to see user-led organisations build more alliances.“We have got to be outward-looking as movements, we have got to collaborate more, we have got to be more tolerant of each other’s differences, we have got to really work on addressing diversity in our activities.”But he feels “optimistic” for the future, as long as disabled people and their organisations work “in concert” with others.“People listen to people with shared understanding and experience, people like them,” he says. “We must show that commonality.”He is convinced that the values represented by the disabled people’s movement and user-led organisations will win through.The values that he says have been imposed on society – individualism, fighting each other, greed and criminality – “seem immensely powerful, but they don’t stand up to investigation”.Instead, what ordinary people want are “traditional values about treating people with respect and not discriminating”.“They are the things that the disabled people’s movement, the other movements and user-led organisations are fighting for,” he says. “They are eternal values and those values will out.”last_img read more

First Team Match

first_imgSaints face Wigan in a ‘Bad Friday’ derby at the Totally Wicked Stadium with tickets selling fast and Lomax insists Friday’s clash with the Warriors “means so much” to both sets of fans.“You’re brought up on the derby as a young lad, he said. “If you are a Saints fan or a Wigan fan, it means so much. Some games mean more and this is one of them!“It’s a local derby, local rivalry and form and league table goes out of the window for these games. It is something we look forward to and something you want to be a part of as a kid when you grow up and nothing changes as you continue through your career. You are upset if you miss them and if you are a part of them you look forward to them. The whole week is built up and it is different to other weeks.”As Saints Head Coach Justin Holbrook alluded to, Wigan have found form in recent weeks, winning five games on the bounce and Lomax insists he and the rest of the Saints squad knew it was only a matter of time before our neighbours found their feet.“We had no doubts about how good of a side Wigan are. Even at the beginning of the year, their form wasn’t where they wanted it to be but at the end of the day they were champions last year for a reason and have been there or there about’s every year.“If they haven’t won it they have been up there and that is what you expect. Wigan are a champion side and their form is reflecting that. There is a lot of mutual respect between the two teams and it is for that reason – because we are two good teams. Hopefully we can put on a good spectacle come Friday.The game is not televised for the first time in 24 years, but Jonny believes that can hopefully add to the atmosphere on the night with close to a sell out expected.“I suppose it is a bit of bizarre one because as fans you want to see these games, but I suppose it [the atmosphere] will only add to the spice of the game and hopefully it can be a sell out, the atmosphere will be loud and that will add to the excitement about playing in these games.” For the first time in 24 years and 94 consecutive games, the fixture can only be experienced live with a match ticket as it will not be televised!Tickets for this MUST-SEE event start from just £10 for 16s and under and £23 for adults.You can get your tickets online here by calling 01744 455052 or by visiting the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium – subject to availability, while stocks last.,Tickets for this MUST-SEE event start from just £10 for 16s and under and £23 for adults.You can get your tickets online here by calling 01744 455052 or by visiting the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium – subject to availability, while stocks last.last_img read more

Security Threats From Within

first_img –shares April 1, 2002 With all the home office workers, laptops are in frequent use. Many times the security prevention in a laptop is turned off when remotely connecting. This is another major internal vulnerability or internal threat.So if 80 percent of IT crimes are internal, what should a company do about it?Perform a security audit, or have one performed.Unless the knowledge, experience and manpower exist in-house, consult an outside expert on audits, policies, and the subsequent security monitoring and prevention service.Ensure adequate background checks on employees.Establish a security policy, and enforce it. This includes implementing things like swipe cards, changing passwords often and restricting sensitive areas. This creates the right attitude toward information security in your company and clarifies the consequences of any found internal breach. A professional consulting firm specializing in policy development can save time and money and ensure an up-to-date policy.Use firewalls. Firewalls protect against unauthorized logins usually from the outside world, preventing hackers from logging on to your network.Use virus scanning software. Attachments to e-mails received and passed around are the biggest reason for the spread of viruses.Implement ongoing managed services.These are only a few ideas for combating internal security threats that surround us all. Enlist the help of a professional security consulting firm that will do both the audit and policy development before implementing a complete managed services package.Michael Bruck is the founding partner of BAI Security, an 8-year-old information security consulting firm. Bruck leads his security team with a successful 16-year background in IT management and senior engineering positions. He is also the developer and author of best practices that are becoming standards in the information security consulting business. He can be reached via www.baisecurity.netor by email at mbruck@baisecurity.net.The opinions expressed in this column are those of the author, not of Entrepreneur.com. All answers are intended to be general in nature, without regard to specific geographical areas or circumstances, and should only be relied upon after consulting an appropriate expert, such as an attorney or accountant. Few know as much about your IT security as your employees and former employees do. Here’s how to safeguard your technology from the inside. Technology Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Next Article Security Threats From Within Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.center_img Q: I have heard that one of the biggest information security threats to a company can come from within. Is this true? What exactly does it mean, and what can be done about it?A: When people think of an information security threat or a “security breach,” thoughts of bad buys, gangsters and hackers come to mind. Companies usually make sizeable investments to prevent intrusions to their systems, put protections in place and know the seriousness of external threats.Companies usually try to patch every loophole and make every system impenetrable. But guess who knows more about these loopholes and ports of penetration than anyone? A company’s own employees (or former employees). In reality, disgruntled, former or fired employees or even external service providers are the most likely culprits of a security breach–anyone with “insider information.” It is for that very reason that four out of five IT-related crimes are committed from within an organization.Internal threats might be someone who knows the weaknesses of the software being used or has the ability to introduce viruses into a system. Viruses can come from within simply by opening e-mail attachments. Some employees find it easy to gain access to restricted areas; this may include the possession of unauthorized passwords. If something is password-protected, chances are there is confidential information involved. Next Step Register Now » Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Add to Queue 3 min read Help prevent internal theft with “Caught in the Act.” Keep your IT under lock and key with Security and Loss Prevention: An Introductionby Philip P. Purpura.last_img read more

SmartyPig Savings Site With Strings Attached

first_imgFinance Next Article 5 min read SmartyPig automates transfers to a savings account to help you fund a big-ticket goal–and it might help you encourage pals to chip in. –shares Add to Queue June 5, 2008 You don’t need to be a finance whiz to recognize that the least painful way to pay for a big-ticket item–a new car, say, or a dream vacation–is to save small amounts toward it, week by week, month by month, paycheck by paycheck. But how many of us are disciplined enough to set aside money for a planned future purchase?SmartyPig promises not only to help you save toward a goal but also to make it simple for family members and friends to contribute (think birthday gift)–and, in many cases, the service might even help make the goal itself cost less. But while the general concept sounds good, the implementation hides a few notable gotchas that might prove annoying to some.Basically, SmartyPig gives you a savings account with a competitive annual percentage yield (the site’s banking partner is West Bank of Des Moines, and at this early-June writing the APY was 3.9 percent), to which you must set up regular, automatic monthly transfers from an existing bank account (SmartyPig says that nonautomated funding will be available soon to allow people to set up accounts for wedding registries and similar goals). Each account must be tied to a savings goal (you don’t need to have an actual item in mind, but you must set a dollar figure), which you can change at any time. You can opt to make your goal public, so that people can contribute toward it by visiting SmartyPig and entering your e-mail address. You can also encourage such gifts by putting a SmartyPig widget on your blog or on personal pages on sites such as Facebook, Google, Live, and MySpace.Adults can set up SmartyPig accounts for minors by designating the children as co-owners who can then track their progress toward a purchase–an Xbox 360 or Wii, for example. SmartyPig positions itself as a tool to help kids understand the concept of saving.To Market, To MarketNow for the caveats. SmartyPig accounts are free, but when you reach your goal, you can’t easily cash out: SmartyPig would much rather help you actually buy something.First, you can check SmartyPig’s list of retail partners (which include such blue-chip outfits as Amazon.com, Apple Tours, Best Buy, Gap, Home Depot, and Lowe’s) to see if one of them is selling whatever you were saving for at a good price; if so, you can have your savings converted to a gift card for that retailer, which SmartyPig will ship to you for free.This setup can save you a bit of money, since the retailers on SmartyPig all offer small boosts (of a couple of percentage points, up to 5 percent) to the face value of the gift card. Gift cards, however, often have their own drawbacks–time limits for use, for example. It’s up to you to investigate the terms and conditions on each retailer’s site.Alternatively, you can have your savings and interest converted into a SmartyPig debit MasterCard, which you can use either to make a purchase at any place that accepts MasterCard or to withdraw cash at an ATM that accepts debit MasterCards. Keep in mind, though, that most ATMs limit the amount of cash you can withdraw on a given day to a few hundred dollars.Also, ATM fees may apply, and they can quickly mount if you’re forced to withdraw your sum over several days. You face no fees for using the card at ATMs in the Shazam network, which has ATMs in 27 states (including West Bank ATMs). Regardless, to use the card, you must maintain a SmartyPig account.Check by Snail MailWhat if you need to take out the cash in your SmartyPig account for an emergency? You can have SmartyPig cut you a check, but you’ll have to wait for it to arrive via snail mail; the company says the process takes five to seven days after all pending transactions have posted to your account. SmartyPig will not electronically transfer funds to other bank accounts (although the company says that feature will be supported soon).SmartyPig also charges a fee to people who want to contribute to your goal using a credit card–2.9 percent of the amount of the gift. The convenience might be worth the extra cost to some gift-givers, but other folks might prefer to save a few bucks by dashing off a check. (SmartyPig account holders, however, can use their funding accounts to contribute to other account holders’ goals free of charge.)I have mixed feelings about SmartyPig. You could accomplish a lot of what it does simply by setting up automatic transfers to a savings account (yours or your child’s) on your own–and you wouldn’t have to sacrifice the ability to withdraw your cash easily on a moment’s notice. The 2.9 percent fee for credit card donations from non-SmartyPig account holders would discourage me from giving such a gift.On the other hand, getting a discount (even a small one) from a retailer you might patronize anyway beats a free toaster as a come-on for a savings account, and whenever I’ve checked, SmartyPig’s interest rates were on the high end of those available. The premise is gimmicky, sure, but if SmartyPig helps you avoid putting a big-ticket item on your credit card, it’s worth a try. Brought to you by PCWorld Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. SmartyPig: Savings Site With Strings Attached Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

BlackBerry Launches Secure Work Space for Android and Apple Devices

first_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now » BlackBerry launched a service on Tuesday allowing government agencies and corporate clients to secure and manage devices powered by Google Inc’s Android platform and Apple Inc’s iOS operating system.The long-anticipated offering, which BlackBerry had said would come out around mid-year, could help the company sell high-margin services to its large clients even if many, or all, of their workers are using smartphones made by its competitors.The new Secure Work Space feature will be managed through BlackBerry Enterprise Service (BES) 10, a new back-end system launched at the start of this year that allows BlackBerry’s clients to control mobile devices on their internal networks.The company, a one-time pioneer in the smartphone arena, is now fighting to regain ground lost to Apple’s iPhone and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd’s Galaxy devices. To compete, it has rolled out a trio of devices powered by its new BlackBerry 10 operating system.It hopes to win back users with the Z10, Q10 and Q5 devices that were unveiled during the first half of this year. The first comprehensive look at the success of its turnaround plan will likely emerge when it reports quarterly results on Friday.At the same time, it has indicated a shift in emphasis from smartphones to services.”With an integrated management console, our clients can now see all of the devices they have on their network, manage those devices and connect to them securely,” David Smith, the head of enterprise mobile computing at BlackBerry, said in an interview.”We now also have a secure work space on Android and iOS that allows our clients to secure and manage the data on those devices as well.”BlackBerry has installed some 18,000 BES 10 servers since the system was launched in January, up from a little more than 12,000 servers one month ago, and more than 60 percent of U.S. Fortune 500 companies are testing or using the system.The feature, when used to manage Android and iOS devices, will allow IT managers to fence off corporate email, calendars, contacts, tasks, memos, Web browsing and document editing from personal apps and content, which could be less secure.(Editing by Edmund Klamann) Next Article –shares June 25, 2013 2 min read Euan Rochacenter_img 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List BlackBerry Launches ‘Secure Work Space’ for Android and Apple Devices Add to Queue Image credit: Reuters/Mark Blinch Technology This story originally appeared on Reuterslast_img read more

Report Snapchats 23YearOld CEO Said No to 3 Billion From Facebook

first_img –shares Brian Patrick Eha Report: Snapchat’s 23-Year-Old CEO Said No to $3 Billion From Facebook Next Article 2 min read Technology November 13, 2013 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Add to Queue UPDATE: This Is the 23-Year-Old Entrepreneur Who Just Turned Down $3 Billion From FacebookUntil recently, it would have been a safe bet that no 23-year-old in the world had ever turned up his nose at $3 billion. But that’s exactly what Evan Spiegel, the co-founder and chief executive of messaging service Snapchat, did when Facebook offered to buy his company.Citing unnamed sources familiar with the offer, The Wall Street Journal reports Facebook offered Snapchat an all-cash deal of $3 billion or more. At the time of its last funding round, in June, Snapchat was valued at only $800 million. (It raised $60 million in June of a total $73 million to date.)The deal would have marked Facebook’s most expensive acquisition, outstripping even its $1 billion purchase of Instagram in 2012.Snapchat has been enjoying explosive growth as the app of the moment for teens, tweens and twentysomethings who act like teens. In September, Spiegel announced that his service transmitted 350 million snaps a day, up 75 percent from the time of its $60 million Series B round. Snapchat allows users to send photo and video messages to each other that disappear after several seconds. The ephemeral nature of Snapchats make them a popular medium for sexually suggestive photos, not to mention silly stuff that you don’t want preserved forever on a Facebook Timeline.Still, given that Snapchat has yet to earn any revenue, the idea of turning down a buy offer three times the value of that which Mark Zuckerberg himself once turned down seems — not to put too fine a point on it — insane. It appears Spiegel and his co-founder, Bobby Murphy, also turned down a $200 million investment offer from Chinese company Tencent Holdings that would have valued Snapchat at $4 billion.But Snapchat’s young executives may soon have a better offer on the table. According to The Wall Street Journal, they are hoping their numbers continue to improve through early 2014, when they may be finally willing to consider an acquisition or investment. But they may be kicking themselves if their core user base becomes enamored of another service and leaves Snapchat behind before its founders can cash in.Related: Why Tech Valuations Can’t Be Too High or Too Low 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now »last_img read more

Report Space Projects Lured 18 Billion in Venture Capital Last Year

first_img 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Next Article Venture capital groups invested $1.8 billion in commercial space startups in 2015, more than in the last 15 years combined, a report by aerospace consultants the Tauri Group shows.The lion’s share of the 2015 space investments was a $1 billion round of financing for Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, founded and overseen by technology entrepreneur Elon Musk, who also runs Tesla Motors Inc.“The year 2015 was a record-setting year for space ventures, with investment and debt financing of $2.7 billion,” according to the Tauri Group’s “Start-Up Space” report, which was released on Monday.While individual investors are not always disclosed, the Tauri Group found that 21 people on the Forbes’ billionaires list have an affiliation to a space enterprise. The investors include Microsoft Corp.’s Bill Gates, Amazon.com Inc.’s Jeff Bezos, Alphabet Inc.’s Larry Page, Dish Network Corp.’s Charles Ergen, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, Tencent’s Ma Huateng, Las Vegas Sands Corporation’s Sheldon Adelson, Google’s Eric Schmidt, Grupo Salinas’ Ricardo Salinas and Virgin Galactic’s Richard Branson.The Tauri Group report was partly funded by NASA.Since 2000, space ventures have won more than $13.3 billion in investment, including $5.1 billion in debt financing, the study showed.Since 2000, companies have paid $2.2 billion to acquire space ventures, with deals worth $1.7 billion occurring in the last five years. Those include Monsanto Co.’s purchase of the Climate Corporation for $930 million, Google’s purchase of Skybox Imaging for $478 million and ViaSat Inc.’s acquisition of WildBlue for $568 million, the study showed.About 50 venture-capital firms are investing in space including Bessemer, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, First Round Capital, Founders Fund, Khosla, and RRE Ventures. The investments include SpaceX, Accion Systems, Planet Labs, Rocket Lab, Skybox Imaging and Spire Global.Overall, venture capital investments in U.S. firms totaled almost $60 billion in 2015, with the software industry pulling in $23.6 billion, followed by biotechnology at $7.4 billion, a January 2016 report by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the National Venture Capital Association showed.Venture-capital investments in media and entertainment companies in 2015 totaled $4.7 billion, financial services brought in $3 billion, and medical devices and equipment companies attracted $2.7 billion in investments, the study showed.(Reporting by Irene Klotz; Editing by Lisa Shumaker) Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Reuters February 26, 2016 –sharescenter_img Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Image credit: Shutterstock Space Travel Report: Space Projects Lured $1.8 Billion in Venture Capital Last Year Add to Queue Register Now »last_img read more

SpaceX Achieves First Successful Rocket Landing at Sea

first_img SpaceX Achieves First Successful Rocket Landing at Sea Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Next Article SpaceX Image credit: SpaceX Add to Queue Tom Brandt April 11, 2016center_img After SpaceX’s previous attempts to land a rocket at sea ended in failure, the company successfully landed its Falcon 9 rocket on Friday afternoon on a landing platform in the Atlantic Ocean.It was a historic landing of a rocket’s first stage soon after it launched, and congratulations poured in from around the globe, including from President Barack Obama, who tweeted “Congrats SpaceX on landing a rocket at sea. It’s because of innovators like you & NASA that America continues to lead in space exploration.”Landing from the chase plane pic.twitter.com/2Q5qCaPq9P— SpaceX (@SpaceX) April 8, 2016After its launch at 4:43 p.m. Eastern time, the 14-story-tall booster used its remaining fuel to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and touch down on an unanchored “droneship” in the middle of the Atlantic (dubbed “Of Course I Still Love You”).”It’s another step toward the stars,” SpaceX founder Elon Musk said at a press conference afterwards, according to the Washington Post. “In order for us to really open up access to space we have to have full and rapid reusability.”SpaceX has successfully landed the Falcon 9 rocket on land several times. But achieving a sea landing is important because such landings will almost certainly be necessary for future missions when vessels returning from farther celestial destinations like the moon or Mars approach the the Earth at high velocities.Today’s launch used SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft to bring supplies to the International Space Station. It was filled with about 7,000 pounds of critical supplies and payloads for the space station crew, including materials to support research and scientific investigations. The Dragon capsule itself will return to Earth in about a month, when it will splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the California coast. 2 min read Enroll Now for $5 –shares Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. This story originally appeared on PCMaglast_img read more

Huawei Wants to Beat Apple in Smartphones in Two Years

first_img November 4, 2016 Huawei Wants to Beat Apple in Smartphones in Two Years The Chinese company on Thursday launched a new premium phone, which will sell for about $777. This story originally appeared on Reuters –shares Next Article Image credit: Reuters | Hannibal Hanschke China’s Huawei Technologies wants to be the world’s second-largest maker of smartphones in two years, Richard Yu, chief executive of Huawei’s consumer business group, told Reuters on Thursday.Having made its name as a builder of telecommunications networks, Huawei has been active in the consumer devices market for only a few years and is now the third-biggest smartphone maker after Apple Inc. and the world leader in the $400 billion market, Samsung Electronics.”When we announced four years ago that we wanted to sell phones, people told us we were crazy. When we said we wanted to sell 100 million phones, they told us we were crazy,” Yu said at a launch event in Munich.Huawei on Thursday launched a new premium phone, which will sell for about $777 apiece. A version developed with Porsche Design will cost about $1,550.The phone has a new artificial intelligence feature: It can learn about its user’s habits and automatically put the most frequently used apps in easy reach.Huawei was the world’s third-largest smartphone maker in the third quarter with 33.6 million shipped devices, giving it a 9 percent market share, according to research firm Strategy Analytics.Apple was still well ahead with 45.5 million devices, or a 12 percent market share. Samsung was the world leader with 75.3 million shipped devices and a market share of 20.1 percent.”We are going to take them (Apple) step-by-step, innovation-by-innovation,” Yu said, adding that he expected to improve Huawei’s position along with technology shifts.”There will be more opportunities. Artificial intelligence, virtual reality, augmented reality,” he said. “It is like driving a car. At every curve or turn, there is an opportunity to overtake the competition.”With the new phone, dubbed Mate 9, Yu expects to make a break in European markets such as Germany, France and Great Britain. “In Finland, we are already number one,” he said.With Apple struggling to come up with surprise designs and Samsung reeling from having to scrap its flagship phone, Yu said Huawei was at a tipping point.”Step-by-step we are winning the trust and loyalty of the customers. It is about trust and loyalty.”(Reporting by Harro ten Wolde; Editing by Jonathan Oatis) Reuters center_img Register Now » Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 2 min read Add to Queue Huawei Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Huawei CEO Richard Yu presents Huawei’s new smartphone, the Mate S.last_img read more

Intapp Acquires OnePlace

first_imgIntapp Acquires OnePlace PRNewswireMay 28, 2019, 4:55 pmMay 28, 2019 Oneplace Teaoneplace Team Joins Intapp to Deliver a Unified Client Lifecycle Solution for the Professional Services IndustryIntapp announced it has acquired OnePlace, a leading provider of cloud-based solutions for marketing and business development teams. Intapp and OnePlace are joining forces to address the growing need for a unified front office solution spanning the client lifecycle that helps firms cultivate key relationships, drive growth, and better compete in their modern marketplace.OnePlace, founded in 2012, was an early pioneer in cloud-based marketing solutions, helping more than 60 professional services customers replace their legacy CRM. The combination brings together OnePlace’s deep domain knowledge and team of experts in marketing and business development technology, with Intapp’s market-leading Industry Cloud for Professional Services.With this acquisition, the market will now have an integrated client lifecycle solution for the front office that enables seamless collaboration across the firm and its partners and business services teams; from strategy to origination and execution.Marketing Technology News: Relativity Showcases a New Way to Analyze Short Message and Mobile Data“Coupled with our other recent acquisitions of DealCloud and gwabbit, adding OnePlace to our portfolio further demonstrates Intapp’s commitment to assembling the industry’s best team to deliver on the full vision of a modern, unified front office solution for our customers,” said Dan Tacone, Intapp’s President. “Together, we will help our customers execute marketing and business development growth strategies more efficiently and effectively.”Marketing Technology News: Information Builders’ WebFOCUS Named a FrontRunner in Business Intelligence in Fourth Consecutive Report“My team and I are excited to join with Intapp to make the industry’s leading client lifecycle experience even more complete and powerful,” said Tim Smith, OnePlace’s CEO. “At its core, this acquisition will deliver a single, reliable source of truth for client and prospect knowledge to our combined customer roster. Like Intapp, we believe in the ‘everything in one place’ ethos. Our combined team has the unique capability to execute this vision.”Marketing Technology News: Usabilla Named a Strong Performer in 2019 Acquisitioncloud-based solutionscrmIntappMarketing TechnologyNewsOnePlaceTim Smith Previous ArticleEnghouse Buys Espial Group Inc.Next ArticleGainsight Unveils the Customer Cloud, the Future of Customer Success Technologylast_img read more

New synthetic compound based on brain hormone holds promise for cancer treatment

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 6 2018A lab team led by Nobel Prize winner Dr. Andrew Schally at the Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and the University of Miami showed that a synthetic compound based on a brain hormone spurred the growth of cancer cells in Petri dishes but enigmatically had the opposite effect in mice.The surprising discovery, reported online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on Oct. 29, 2018, holds promise for cancer treatment. But it is also important because the manmade compound and others like it have shown beneficial effects in preclinical studies to treat a range of medical conditions affecting the heart, pancreas, eyes, and other organs. That’s because the compounds spur the growth of new healthy tissue. Tests in animal models suggest, for example, that they could help grow new heart muscle cells after a heart attack.The compound tested in the new PNAS report, MR409, is one of several patented analogs, or derivatives, made in Schally’s lab based on growth hormone-releasing hormone, or GHRH. GHRH is made in the brain’s hypothalamus. It triggers the production and release of growth hormone in the pea-sized pituitary gland, located near the base of the brain. Growth hormone, in turn, is essential for human growth and cell regeneration.The fear among Schally and his scientist peers, though, was that while GHRH analogs might be potent medicine for some conditions, they might at the same time cause cancer cells to grow, due to their growth-stimulating properties.”I was concerned,” says Schally. “GHRH, in addition to being a brain hormone, is a powerful growth factor. I was afraid it would be stimulatory to tumors. Imagine us using it in patients with heart disease or diabetes and seeing cancers appear. That would make it completely unacceptable as a therapy.”That’s precisely what MR409 did when applied to cell cultures in the latest experiments: It caused lung cancer cells from human tumors to multiply and spread, and kept them from dying.But the hormone analog had the opposite effect when injected into mice with implanted human tumors: Not only did the compound not feed the cancer cells, it caused them to stop growing. It had this effect on lung, pancreatic, gastric, bladder, prostate, breast, and colorectal cancers. The analog, paradoxically, worked like counterpart analogs known as antagonists that are designed to block, not mimic, the action of GHRH.”These are very welcome findings,” notes the VA Nobelist. “They may alleviate serious concerns about stimulating growth of cancers with GHRH agonists in the course of therapy for other diseases and conditions.”Agonists are analogs that act like a key in a lock to initiate a biochemical reaction in the body. In the key-lock analogy, the lock is a receptor–a protein on the cell surface that interacts with the agonist to trigger a reaction. Antagonists, on the other hand, jam up the receptor so no reaction can occur. GHRH antagonists have been tested extensively by Schally’s group and others for their ability to inhibit tumors.Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingLiving with advanced breast cancerSchally and his team believe the most likely reason for MR409’s tumor-inhibitory effect in mice is the down-regulation of GHRH receptors in the pituitary gland and in the tumors themselves. That effect, which can occur only in live animals and not in isolated cells, may explain the dramatic difference between the analog’s effect in cells versus in the organism.”The receptors transmit the hormonal message,” explains Schally. “When there are fewer receptors on the cell surface, this blocks the effect of endogenous [produced within the body] GHRH found in tumors, and thereby blocks tumor growth.”He notes that the receptor-squashing effect is like that seen with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), which, like GHRH, is produced in the brain’s hypothalamus. A treatment for aggressive prostate cancer that is based on LHRH agonists, stemming from Schally’s early discoveries, was introduced in 1984 and is used widely around the world.Schally says the down-regulation of receptors that results from continuous treatment with analogs is like a lock being worn out to the point where it no longer works, and turning the key has no effect.The journal article by Schally’s team is accompanied by a commentary by Drs. Hippokratis Klaris and Ioulia Chatzistamou at the University of South Carolina. They write that MR409 and similar GHRH agonists, given the “virtual absence of toxicity” seen in the newest experiments and past ones, should have “wide effectiveness in diverse cancers” and also hold promise for other diseases and conditions.The latest findings represent the continuation of decades of VA-supported work from Schally’s team, much of it looking at how to stop cancer through hormone-based treatment. At age 91, the scientist still works daily in his research lab in VA, as he has done since 1962. His lab moved from the New Orleans VA to the Miami VA after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 1977 for identifying the structure of hormonal peptides in the brain.GHRH agonists must still be tested in clinical trials in the U.S. before they can be used in routine patient care. That can be a long road, taking several years. But Schally says he is optimistic, in light of his team’s latest results.”I’m not a clinician, but now I have no reservation in recommending the agonists for various clinical uses.” In terms of cancer therapy, he notes the insights gained in the latest study will benefit the further development not only of MR409 and other GHRH agonists, but also GHRH antagonists. He envisions clinicians eventually being able to choose between GHRH agonists and antagonists for cancer treatment. Source:https://www.research.va.gov/currents/1118-Brain-derived-compounds-show-surprising-results-for-cancer.cfmlast_img read more

Sparse treatment options complicate cancer care for immigrants in South Texas

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 23 2019Edgar carries a red folder bulging with paperwork, bills and medical records. Before his lung cancer diagnosis in September, he had about $11,000, he said, money he was saving to purchase a used truck and to pay an immigration attorney to pursue legal residency.By February, it was gone, and Edgar was relying on friends and family to cover doctor appointments, food and other basics. His treatment had been complicated by a collapsed lung.”I’m not able to work — I’m breathing with just one lung,” said the 50-year-old painter, who asked to be identified by only his first name because he’s an undocumented immigrant from Mexico.Edgar had fallen into a black hole for treatment that extends across two South Texas border counties, a stretch with more than 1.2 million residents that’s roughly half the size of Connecticut.There are no public hospitals in the Rio Grande Valley counties of Cameron and Hidalgo, which includes the city of McAllen. In Texas, public hospitals are typically funded by a separate tax on property and provide care to indigent residents in the county where they’re located. Hidalgo County residents have recently voted against such a new property tax.Most hospitals in the region are for-profit facilities. Although a network of nonprofit clinics has developed over the years, their focus is typically primary care and not surgery, imaging or other specialized treatment.Nearly 30% of residents are uninsured, three times the national average of 8.8%, and their median household income is less than $38,000 a year, while the national average is $56,500.Texas has not expanded Medicaid access, and it is difficult for adults to qualify for Medicaid. With few exceptions, an adult is eligible only if he or she is a parent, and then the income cutoff is quite low, no more than $3,827 annually for a parent with two children, according to Anne Dunkelberg, who oversees health policy at the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities.Uninsured adults who develop cancer — or might have cancer, but need further testing to be sure — have nearly no access to affordable medical care, according to local clinicians and directors of safety-net clinics. The options are even more constrained for adults, who are either undocumented or live in families with mixed legal status.To reach public hospitals roughly 250 miles north in San Antonio or 350 miles away in Houston, a cancer patient will likely cross at least one of the border checkpoints — where agents can stop drivers and ask about citizenship and travel plans — that dot Texas roads and lead out of the Rio Grande Valley. That’s an increasingly risky proposition in recent years, said Rebecca Stocker, executive director at Hope Family Health Center, a nonprofit clinic in McAllen. Another option, traveling south to Mexico for what’s often more affordable care, forces undocumented patients to choose between treating their cancer and leaving family members behind, perhaps permanently.”So then you’re stuck in Mexico,” Stocker said. “You may have a husband here, you may have a wife here, you may have your kids here, and you have no way of getting back to them.”Sitting at El Milagro Clinic, another primary care clinic in McAllen, Edgar recounted how he first developed a nagging cough and, nearly two years later, shortness of breath and worsening exhaustion that forced him to seek medical help.He has undergone numerous tests, as well as radiation and chemotherapy, at a for-profit hospital with some discounts and financial help along the way, but he didn’t know how long he could rely on friends and family to pay for further medical care. His chemotherapy was free through a pharmaceutical company’s assistance program, he said, although he paid for related hospital and physician fees.Edgar said he was able a number of years ago to navigate the checkpoints, in part because of his pale skin and reddish hair. But these days, amid heightened immigration scrutiny, he wouldn’t attempt to pass through them to reach more affordable care elsewhere in the state.”If I do that, and they catch me, it’s the end,” he said. “I’ve been living here almost 16 years trying to do everything right, and I don’t want to mess up with that.”Life-Threatening DelaysFor uninsured patients in the Rio Grande Valley, and particularly those who aren’t U.S. citizens, a cancer diagnosis presents a “devastating” situation, said Dr. Elena Marin, chief executive officer of Su Clinica, a large federally qualified health center with multiple primary care locations.Related StoriesStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identified”It’s either a death sentence,” Marin said, “or it’s a prolonged time before you can raise the money in order to get in for some of the treatment that you need.”Visiting with clinicians and clinic directors along the 60-mile stretch from McAllen to Brownsville, it seems as if everyone has a story about life-threatening delays for uninsured adults with cancer. (A nonprofit Rio Grande Valley clinic affiliated with Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine treats children regardless of insurance or legal status.)They talk about patients holding barbecues and other fundraising efforts to try to cobble together money from family and friends to afford surgery, chemotherapy or the biopsy to figure out if they have cancer. A needle biopsy can cost between $1,500 and $2,000, according to a white paper published by a local coalition last fall highlighting lack of access to specialty care.”How many barbecue plates will it take?” asked Ann Williams Cass, executive director of Proyecto Azteca, which works with low-income communities, including areas called colonias that may have limited access to electricity, utilities and other basic services. “Most of them, of course, succumb to metastatic disease before they’re able to get help.”A spokesman for Texas Oncology, one of the largest cancer practices in the valley, declined to discuss how physicians there provide treatment to uninsured patients. In a brief statement, the practice said it seeks to help patients, “including working with foundations and other organizations that support patients in need.”Dr. Todd Shenkenberg, a Harlingen oncologist who describes himself as one of the few who routinely treat uninsured patients, said he has developed referral arrangements with local surgeons and specialists. He also relies on pharmaceutical assistance programs to help patients cover costly medications.He told of patients who had ended up at his office because they couldn’t get into an oncologist elsewhere. “To me, it just shouldn’t be,” he said.’The Fear Overwhelms’The cost to see a specialist, whether for cancer or other treatment, can be insurmountable, said Sister Phylis Peters, who leads Proyecto Juan Diego, a nonprofit organization based in Cameron Park, a large colonia north of Brownsville. “They won’t tell you they don’t go, but they just don’t go,” Peters said.The Catholic nun is credited with helping to transform Cameron Park into a community with paved roads, taquerias and other small businesses attached to mobile homes, and a community center is in the works. But Peters no longer allows colorectal- and other cancer-screening initiatives to come into the community.”I don’t believe in screening if we can’t help the patient,” she said, “because I think the psychological trauma and the fear overwhelms.”A patient at the Hope clinic, Carlos Rivera, had been losing weight and living with fierce abdominal pain. But he continued working, installing office furniture in Texas, until he was visiting his wife in Mexico shortly after last Christmas and couldn’t get out of bed.Rivera pulled out the imaging scans that were taken that day at the Mexican clinic, pointing to the black marks on his liver. In early January, a physician in McAllen informed Rivera he had colon cancer that had spread to his liver, and there was no cure. Clinicians and outreach workers began advocating on his behalf, and Rivera got insurance coverage so he could start chemotherapy.Ziomara Tirado, a care coordinator at Hope, recalled when Rivera first approached her in frustration, saying he wanted to fight the cancer but couldn’t qualify for Medicaid and couldn’t afford treatment himself. “In Spanish, he just said to me, `So what does this mean? Someone who doesn’t have insurance doesn’t get saved?'”last_img

New Samsung phone Nicer camera static design higher price

© 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo, the camera lens of a Samsung Galaxy S9 mobile phone is shown in this photo during a product preview in New York. Though Samsung already has one of the best smartphone cameras, it is looking to produce even better low-light shots, while offering a video mode that appears to freeze fast-moving objects. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Some of the increases will be offset with promotions. And T-Mobile will cut prices from last year’s models. You can also buy unlocked versions more cheaply directly from Samsung—$720 for the S9 and $840 for the S9 Plus—though most people in the U.S. buy through their carriers.The new phones were unveiled Sunday in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. Citation: New Samsung phone: Nicer camera, static design, higher price (2018, February 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-samsung-nicer-camera-static-higher.html For the first time in a major phone, the S9 will let you change the camera’s aperture to let in more light, making for better images in dark settings.But analyst Carolina Milanesi of Creative Strategies warns that despite the improvements, the new camera is competing with already good cameras in earlier Samsung phones.Nonetheless, you may have to pay more, though nothing quite at the level of last year’s $100 price hikes for the Galaxy S8. In the U.S., Verizon, AT&T and Sprint are raising prices from what the S8 cost at launch—to nearly $800 for the regular-size S9 and more than $900 for the larger S9 Plus. As people hold onto phones longer before upgrading, price hikes let manufacturers and carriers make up for lost revenue. This Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo shows the Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus, left, and back of a Galaxy S9 mobile phone, during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Explore further — UNCHANGED: The S9 features the same screen, same virtual home button and same battery capacity as the S8. Samsung did move the fingerprint sensor on the back to reduce smears on the camera lens.— A SECOND LENS: The camera on the Plus model now has a second lens with twice the magnification, a feature already available in Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 and some iPhones. This means sharper close-ups.— FUN WITH SELFIES: Snap a selfie, and Samsung’s software will turn that into an emoji version of you for sharing. It’s usually a static image, though you can produce an animated version—much like the iPhone X’s Animoji feature.— VISUAL ASSISTANT: Samsung’s Bixby digital assistant mimics a similar Google feature that pulls up information on landmarks or other items you’ve just photographed. New Bixby capabilities let it instantly translate signs (point the camera, and the phone replaces the sign’s text in a matching color and font) and provide nutritional info for that restaurant meal you’re splurging on. Here are some additional things to know: Samsung unveiled new smartphones with largely unchanged designs and incremental improvements such as a better camera—accompanied by a second annual price increase for many customers. In this Feb. 21, 2018, photo, the Bixby virtual assistant software of a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone translates a foreign language sign during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) This Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo shows an Apple iPhone X, left, and a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone during a preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Mark your calendars: Samsung preps for Galaxy S9 launch This Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo shows an Apple iPhone X, left, and a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone during a preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) In this Feb. 21, 2018, photo, the Bixby virtual assistant software of a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone translates a foreign language sign during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) This Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo shows the Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus, left, and Galaxy S9 mobile phones are shown in this photo during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) In this Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo the Bixby virtual assistant software of a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone identifies food and displays its calorie content during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) The static design of the new Galaxy S9 underscores both the slowing pace of smartphone innovation and the extent to which other manufacturers, particularly Apple, have caught up with Samsung features that once stood out. That includes everything from edge-to-edge screens to facial recognition to a water-resistant body.The new phone’s biggest selling point is a collection of minor improvements to its camera, which is already among the best in the smartphone business . The S9 promises even better low-light shots, while offering a video mode that appears to freeze fast-moving objects, matching a feature in some Sony phones. The S9 can automatically detect when there’s high-speed motion to record, such as a cork popping off a bottle of champagne. A fifth of a second of video gets stretched out into six seconds.While single features like this aren’t likely to drive buying decisions, the slow-motion effect could be “the kind of thing that will get a lot of attention,” said Bob O’Donnell of the research firm Technalysis. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This Wednesday Feb, 21, 2018, photo shows the camera lens of a Samsung Galaxy S9 mobile phone during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) In this Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, photo, Samsung’s Aaron Baker demonstrates the AR Emoji feature on a Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus mobile phone during a product preview in New York. The Galaxy S9 phones were unveiled Sunday, Feb. 25, in Barcelona, Spain, and will be available March 16. Advance orders begin this Friday. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) read more

Swedish Match second quarter operating profit beats expectations

first_imgSTOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Swedish Match (SWMA.ST) posted on Thursday a bigger rise than expected in second-quarter profit and said the roll-out across the United States of its relatively new non-tobacco nicotine pouch product was well underway. Operating profit at the tobacco group rose to 1.43 billion crowns (122.91 million pounds) from a year-ago 1.26 billion. Analysts had on average forecast a profit of 1.36 billion, according to Refinitiv data. “The Snus and moist snuff product segment, and particularly the strong result from ZYN nicotine pouches in the US, drove the improvements in sales and operating profit for the group,” Swedish Match said. It said it was no longer confident that the U.S. cigar market would grow this year in terms of volume. Its previous outlook for the market segment was for modest volume growth. Reporting by Anna Ringstrom, editing by Helena SoderpalmOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

Space Archaeology Is a Thing And It Involves Lasers and Spy Satellites

first_imgWhat does it take to be a space archaeologist? No, you don’t need a rocket or a spacesuit. However, lasers are sometimes involved. And infrared cameras. And spy satellites. Welcome to Sarah Parcak’s world. Parcak, an archaeologist and a professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has mapped sites around the world from space; she does so using images captured by satellites — from NASA and from private companies — orbiting high above the ground. From these lofty heights, sensitive instruments can reveal details that are invisible to scientists on the ground, marking the positions of walls or even entire cities that have been buried for millennia. Parcak unpacks how views from space are transforming the field of archaeology, in her new book “Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019). [Read an excerpt from “Archaeology From Space”] AdvertisementArchaeology Gets a Sci-Fi Makeover, In ‘Archaeology From Space’Live Science sits down with archaeologist and author Sarah Parcak to talk about her new book, “”Archaeology From Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past” (Henry Holt and Co., 2019).Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Fomalhaut Stars Huge Ring of Dusty Debris Captured by ALMA | Video00:54关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65924-space-archaeology-highlights.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0020:0420:04Your Recommended Playlist00:54Fomalhaut Stars Huge Ring of Dusty Debris Captured by ALMA | Video00:43OTD in Space – July 16: Apollo 11 Launches to the Moon13:13Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins Talks Launch on 50th Anniversary06:26How To Find Jupiter and Other Skywatching Objects in July 2016 | Video02:22Skywatching Planets and the Harvest Moon In September 2014 | Video02:22Space.com Builds: Lego NASA Apollo Saturn V Rocket关闭  Satellites analyze landscapes and use different parts of the light spectrum to uncover buried remnants of ancient civilizations. But studying archaeological sites from above had very humble (and low-tech) beginnings, Parcak told Live Science. Researchers first experimented with peering down from a great height at a historic location more than a century ago, when a member of the Corps of Royal Engineers photographed the 5,000-year-old monument Stonehenge from a hot-air balloon. “You could even see — from this very early and somewhat blurry photograph — staining in the landscape around the site, showing that there were buried features there,” Parcak said. Through the 1960s and into the 1970s, aerial photography continued to play an important role in archaeology. But when NASA launched its first satellites it opened up “a completely new world,” for archaeologists in the 1980s and 1990s, Parcak said. In fact, declassified images from the U.S. government’s Corona spy satellite program, which operated from 1959 to 1972, helped archaeologists in the 1990s to reconstruct the positions of important sites in the Middle East that had since disappeared, eradicated by urban expansion. An eye inlay from a tomb dating to 4,000 years ago, in Lisht, Egypt. The expedition, co-led by Dr. Parcak, was conducted in partnership with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak Today, aerial or satellite images captured by optical lenses, thermal cameras, infrared and lidar — light detection and ranging, a type of laser system — are well-established as part of an archaeologist’s tool kit. And archaeologists need as many tools as they can get; there are thought to be millions of sites around the world that are yet to be discovered, Parcak added. But remote sensing isn’t one-size-fits-all; different terrains require different space archaeology techniques. For example, in Egypt, layers of sand blanket lost pyramids and cities. In that type of landscape, high-resolution optical satellites reveal subtle differences on the surface that may hint at structures underground. And in regions with dense vegetation, such as in Southeast Asia or Central America, lidar emits millions of pulses of light to penetrate beneath the trees and detect hidden buildings, Parcak explained. In her own work, Parcak’s analysis of satellite views led to the creation of a new map for the legendary city of Tanis in Egypt, famously featured in the movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark.” Satellite images of Tanis revealed a vast network of the city’s buildings, which had previously gone undetected even as the site was under excavation, she wrote. Image Gallery: How Technology Reveals Hidden Art Treasures In Photos: Ancient Egyptian Tombs Decorated with Creaturescenter_img 7 Amazing Places to Visit with Google Street View If these stories of space archaeology in Parcak’s book leave readers wanting more, they’re in luck. An online platform called GlobalXplorer, launched and run by Parcak, offers users access to a library of satellite images for browsing and annotation. Aspiring “citizen-scientists” can join “campaigns” to assist in the ongoing search for lost cities and ancient structures, and to help experts identify signs of looting in vulnerable sites, according to the platform website. Since 2017, approximately 80,000 users have evaluated 14 million satellite images, mapping 700 major archaeological sites that were previously unknown, Parcak said. “Archaeology From Space” is available to buy on Amazon. Satellite images of the buried ancient Egyptian city Tanis revealed city walls that were invisible to archaeologists on the ground. Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Parcak Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndolast_img read more

Courts duty to strike down law if it violates fundamental right Supreme

first_imgWill the Supreme Court strike down Article 377? (file photo) Published on Once criminality of Article 377 goes, stigma against LGBTQ also will: SC SC to hear pleas challenging re-criminalisation of homosexuality, refuses to adjournments SHARE COMMENTS COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAILcenter_img The courts cannot wait for a “majoritarian government” to decide on enacting, amending or striking down a law if it violates fundamental rights, the Supreme Court asserted today. “We would not wait for the majoritarian government to enact, amend or not to enact any law to deal with violations of fundamental rights,” a five-judge bench headed by Chief Justice Dipak Misra observed while hearing a batch of petitions seeking decriminalisation of consensual gay sex. The courts are not in obligation to wait and would act if any violation of fundamental right was brought before it, the bench, which also comprised Justices R F Nariman, A M Khanwilkar, D Y Chandrachud and Indu Malhotra, said. The observations by the bench, which is dealing with a clutch of petitions challenging the constitutional validity of section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, came when advocate Shyam George, appearing for some Apostolic Alliance of Churches and Utkal Christian Association, submitted that it was the legislature’s job to decide whether to amend or allow section 377 in the statute book. “The moment we are convinced about violation of the fundamental right, the object of these fundamental rights give power to the court to strike down the law,” the bench said.The lawyer also referred to the term “sexual orientation” and said it cannot be read interchangeably with the term “sex” used in article 14 and 15 which deal with the right to equality of the citizen. He said the term sexual orientation was different from the term sex as there have been several kinds of sexual orientation, besides the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer).Section 377 refers to ‘unnatural offences’ and says whoever voluntarily has carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal, shall be punished with imprisonment for life, or with imprisonment of either description for a term which may extend to 10 years, and shall also be liable to pay a fine. The advancing of arguments would resume later in the afternoon.The top court had on July 12 said the social stigma and discrimination attached to the LGBTQ community would go if criminality of consensual gay sex is done away with, while maintaining that it would scrutinise the legal validity of section 377 of the IPC in all its aspects.The court had observed that an environment has been created in the Indian society over the years that has led to deep-rooted discrimination against the community which has also adversely impacted their mental health.Earlier, the government had left it to the apex court to test the constitutional validity of section 377, urging that issues like gay marriages, adoption and ancillary civil rights of LGBTQ should not be dealt by it.Taking note of the Centre’s submission that other issues like gay marriages, adoption and ancillary civil rights of LGBTQ community should not be dealt, the court said it was not considering all these issues.The bench had said it would test the validity of the law in relation to the consensual sexual acts of two adults and if it decides to strike down the penal provision then it would remove “ancillary disqualification” of LGBTQ community members which can join services, contest elections and form associations. Section 377: Centre leaves it to the wisdom of SC to decide validity July 17, 2018 RELATED “We would not wait for the majoritarian government to enact, amend or not to enact any law to deal with violations of fundamental rights.” justice and rightslast_img read more