Month: August 2019

Google Releases DIY Android App Inventor w Video

first_img Explore further Google App Inventor also has blocks for doing ‘programming-like’ things as well as blocks to store information, blocks for repeating actions, and blocks to perform actions under certain conditions. (PhysOrg.com) — Google has announced a new software development program that lets anyone develop an application for Android devices; it’s called the App Inventor for Android. Google says the software is intended to allow any smartphone user develop Android applications without having any prior knowledge of programming languages. Since Google App Inventor provides access to GPS-location sensor, you can build location apps to determine where you are. You can build a useful app that will show you where you parked your car; never forget where you’re car is parked anymore.According to DailyTech, the New York Times states that Harold Abelson is the Google project leader. Harold Abelson is a computer scientist from MIT on sabbatical at Google. Abelson said, “The goal is to enable people to become creators, not just consumers, in this mobile world.” Abelson also stated, “We could only have done this because Android’s architecture is so open.”The App Inventor was tested by women, sixth grade students, nursing students and many others, none of them majoring in computer science.• PhysOrg.com Android apps (new version available) Google Android Application Inventor makes just about anyone a DIY Android App inventor Inserting buttons, blocks and customizing screen colors is just a click away. Credit: Google Labs. Citation: Google Releases DIY Android App Inventor (w/ Video) (2010, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-07-google-diy-android-app-inventor.html With Google App Inventor, blocks can be created for just about everything you can do with an Android phone. Credit: Google Labs. Augmented Reality for Your GPS (w/ Video) © 2010 PhysOrg.com The official Google Labs web page for App Inventor states: “To use App Inventor, you do not need to be a developer. App Inventor requires NO programming knowledge. This is because instead of writing code, you visually design the way the app looks and use blocks to specify the app’s behavior.” More information: App InventorVia: DailyTech This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Tiny robot swarm able to play tunes on a virtual piano w

first_img Kilobots bring us one step closer to a robot swarm © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Tiny robot swarm able to play tunes on a virtual piano (w/ video) (2012, November 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-11-tiny-robot-swarm-tunes-virtual.html (Phys.org)—Researchers at Georgia Tech’s Georgia Robots and InTelligent Systems (GRITS) Laboratory have succeeded in programming a swarm of very tiny robots to figure out for themselves how to go about playing a tune on a virtual piano displayed on a flat plane. One of the robots is the leader, and knows the tune and where a robot needs to be to create the notes that make up the tune; that information is conveyed to the other robots that make up the swarm, and the result is the playing of the familiar classical tune, Beethoven’s “Fur Elise.” More information: gritslab.gatech.edu/home/2011/ … er-follower-control/ Explore further With swarming, individual members take actions based on the location and actions of those around them. With this new research, the objective was to cause individual members of the swarm to appear at a certain location on the virtual keyboard at a certain time to cause the playing of a note; necessary ingredients to create music. The catch though, was that only one of them, the designated leader, was “told” what those data points were beforehand. Thus, the leader had to convey to the other bots where they needed to be and when. The team added some other elements to the goal to increase the difficulty of the assignment, which should theoretically help in learning more about how to program swarms. They wanted the bots to use the fewest number of themselves possible to play a song together, based on the tempo of the song (and to use the shortest routes possible all while avoiding collisions). If a song is played slow enough, for example, it could be performed by one little robot racing across the virtual keyboard (or by a person using just one finger perhaps on a real piano). As the tempo picks up, it becomes impossible for one bot to get the next note in time for the song to play correctly, thus another bot is added, starting a swarm.What’s remarkable about the playing bots is that the leader doesn’t just tell every other bot where it’s supposed to be, instead, it conveys information to those nearest to it, which in turn convey information to those nearest them, and so on. In this way, each robot is able to work out for itself where it is supposed to be and when – which is how it’s supposed to be, because that’s how swarming works in the natural world. The robots, called Khepera bots by the team, are very small, just 5.5 centimeters across their thimble shaped bodies. Each has a host of sensors, including in their little hats and antenna and two wheels to allow for moving around. The whole idea is to create swarming behavior that mimics that seen in nature with birds, fish, etc.last_img read more

Continuous breathing metalorganic framework with guest selectivity

first_img More information: Elliot J. Carrington et al. Solvent-switchable continuous-breathing behaviour in a diamondoid metal–organic framework and its influence on CO2 versus CH4 selectivity, Nature Chemistry (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2747AbstractUnderstanding the behaviour of flexible metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)—porous crystalline materials that undergo a structural change upon exposure to an external stimulus—underpins their design as responsive materials for specific applications, such as gas separation, molecular sensing, catalysis and drug delivery. Reversible transformations of a MOF between open- and closed-pore forms—a behaviour known as ‘breathing’—typically occur through well-defined crystallographic transitions. By contrast, continuous breathing is rare, and detailed characterization has remained very limited. Here we report a continuous-breathing mechanism that was studied by single-crystal diffraction in a MOF with a diamondoid network, (Me2NH2)[In(ABDC)2] (ABDC, 2-aminobenzene-1,4-dicarboxylate). Desolvation of the MOF in two different solvents leads to two polymorphic activated forms with very different pore openings, markedly different gas-adsorption capacities and different CO2 versus CH4 selectivities. Partial desolvation introduces a gating pressure associated with CO2 adsorption, which shows that the framework can also undergo a combination of stepped and continuous breathing. Proposed role of guest–framework interactions in the solvent-dependent continuous-breathing properties of SHF-61. Credit: (c) Nature Chemistry (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nchem.2747 After heating SHF-61-CHCl3 to remove solvent, it exhibited type I adsorption isotherm behavior for N2 and CO2. This was as expected from previous studies. What was new for this study, though, was that CH4 also followed type I adsorption isotherm, but it took much longer for adsorption to occur. This kinetic difference allows for selective adsorption, which has implications for practical uses such as catalysis and separation techniques.Typically studies with MOFs are either all or nothing in the sense that the adsorption measurements are taken after complete desolvation of the MOF to determine total guest uptake. SHF-61 was also studied for gas adsorption as a partially desolvated MOF, which is the first of this kind of study. The partially desolvated SHF-61-DMF showed a stair-step isotherm instead of type I adsorption isotherm typical of an approximately fixed pore size. The mechanism at work here was identified by in situ powder x-ray diffraction and has to do with a sudden opening of the pores at a particular CO2 pressure threshold.Finally, while cation-framework interactions are difficult to study, crystallographic studies show that guest-framework and cation-framework interactions control the breathing mechanism, particularly whether the guest is able to overcome cation-framework interactions. This explains the stair-step adsorption pattern for the partially desolvated MOF. While adsorption of CO2 is at first slow, once the pressure of CO2 is high enough to overcome cation-framework interactions, then the pores open allowing for more CO2 to adsorb.This research demonstrates a unique continuous breathing MOF whose properties have allowed for unprecedented studies in the SHF-61’s mechanism and guest selectivity. This research has implications for molecular sensing for gas separation. Because the authors were able to gain new insights into continuous breathing MOFs, future research may include developing other continuous breathing MOFs. Journal information: Nature Chemistry Flexible metal-organic frameworks with range of pore sizes made by threading through molecular ligands This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2017 Phys.org Explore further (Phys.org)—Researchers from the University of Sheffield report a new continuous-breathing metal-organic framework (MOF), SHF-61, that has two different solvent-specific forms, a narrow-pore structure that is the result of DMF or H2O desolvation and a wide-pore structure that is the result of CHCl3 desolvation. The wide-pore form showed uptake of N2, CO2, and CH4 with selectivity for CO2. They were also able to conduct single-crystal structure analysis of their MOF during breathing motions. Their work appears in Nature Chemistry. “Being modular in construction allows MOFs to be tailored for a wide variety of applications that exploit their molecular-scale porosity. Highly flexible MOFs remain uncommon, but offer the possibility of developing guest-responsive materials. Identifying new flexible MOFs may open many doors for applications, particularly in selective entrapment and release, separation and sensing of molecules,” explains Lee Brammer, who is Professor of Inorganic and Solid State Chemistry at the University of Sheffield. “The flexible behavior of SHF-61 is quite complicated, but what helped in this case is that it proved feasible to study the structural changes in some detail by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.”Breathing MOFs, are metal-organic frameworks whose structure reversibly changes upon some kind of external stimulus. Very few MOFs have been reported to display breathing behavior and of the known MOFs, most undergo some kind of structural change due to a crystal phase transition. This structural change leads to a difference in pore size, which, in turn, allows for the reversible adsorption and desorption of guests. Because these MOFs undergo a phase change, their adsorption profiles (i.e., adsorption isotherms) look like stair steps.What is not common among breathing MOFs is continuous rather than a stair-step adsorption profile. Continuous breathing MOFs, such as MIL-88, have proven difficult to isolate and study. This paper reports single-crystal and powder XRD studies of continuous-breathing MOF SHF-61.SHF-61, or (Me2NH2)[In(ABDC)2], where ABDC is 2-aminobenzene-1,4-dicarboxylate, has an In(III) metal coordinated to carboxylates that serve as hinges for the continuous breathing mechanism. The authors point out that the hinge is from rotation of the ABDC ligands around the O—-O of the carboxylates. This is accompanied by changes in the coordination geometry around In(III). The combination of the two motions enables the continuous breathing.Specifically, In(III) is chelated to four ABDC ligands providing a flattened tetrahedral geometry around the metal center. The resulting anionic framework has diamond-shaped pores, which contain dimethylammonium cations that balance the charge. The pore size is largely dependent on the solvent. Carrington et al. isolated solvated forms of the MOF, SHF-61-DMF and SHF-61-CHCl3, and demonstrated how removal of each solvent affects pore size, and therefore guest uptake, differently. Removal of the more strongly interacting DMF leads to narrowing of the pores whereas removal of the more weakly interacting CHCl3 leaves the pores fully open. Citation: Continuous breathing metal-organic framework with guest selectivity (2017, March 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-03-metal-organic-framework-guest.htmllast_img read more

Carbon uptake in Tibetan Plateau soil may offset melting permafrost carbon release

first_img Explore further Citation: Carbon uptake in Tibetan Plateau soil may offset melting permafrost carbon release (2017, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-carbon-uptake-tibetan-plateau-soil.html © 2017 Phys.org Anyone paying attention to the science surrounding global warming has heard about the problem of carbon released into the atmosphere due to permafrost melting in colder parts of the planet. Less well known or understood is what happens to the soil above the permafrost. As temperatures rise, soil above the permafrost becomes warmer, offering a haven for new plant growth—such plants have been found to sequester carbon from the air back into the soil. Thus, as more carbon is released from below, more is sequestered from above, but is it possible that new sequestering offsets old release? That is what the researchers with this new effort want to know. To learn more, they studied soil samples taken from multiple sites in the Tibetan Plateau (a large elevated plateau north of the Himalayas) in the early 2000s and compared them with similar samples taken a decade later.The researchers report that the soil samples were taken from depths up to 30 cm (which is above the permafrost line) and found an average accumulation of carbon in the soil to have occurred at a mean rate of 28.0 g cm−2 yr−1, which they concluded was due to accumulation of organic carbon concentrations (material left when plants died). They describe the increase as substantial, and possibly enough to offset carbon released due to permafrost melting. More tests will have to be conducted to determine if there is a true offset, but the study results suggest that climate change models might have to be adjusted if offsetting occurs in regions much farther north. If carbon released by melting permafrost in Russia, Canada and other parts of the world is offset by new plant growth, it is possible that much less carbon will make its way into the atmosphere than has been predicted, resulting in slower than predicted global warming. More information: Jinzhi Ding et al. Decadal soil carbon accumulation across Tibetan permafrost regions, Nature Geoscience (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2945AbstractPermafrost soils store large amounts of carbon. Warming can result in carbon release from thawing permafrost, but it can also lead to enhanced primary production, which can increase soil carbon stocks. The balance of these fluxes determines the nature of the permafrost feedback to warming. Here we assessed decadal changes in soil organic carbon stocks in the active layer—the uppermost 30 cm—of permafrost soils across Tibetan alpine regions, based on repeated soil carbon measurements in the early 2000s and 2010s at the same sites. We observed an overall accumulation of soil organic carbon irrespective of vegetation type, with a mean rate of 28.0 g C m−2 yr−1 across Tibetan permafrost regions. This soil organic carbon accrual occurred only in the subsurface soil, between depths of 10 and 30 cm, mainly induced by an increase of soil organic carbon concentrations. We conclude that the upper active layer of Tibetan alpine permafrost currently represents a substantial regional soil carbon sink in a warming climate, implying that carbon losses of deeper and older permafrost carbon might be offset by increases in upper-active-layer soil organic carbon stocks, which probably results from enhanced vegetation growth. Journal information: Nature Geosciencecenter_img Natural-colour satellite image of the Tibetan Plateau. Credit: NASA This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Study shows microbes may accelerate loss of permafrost in Greenland (Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has found that carbon uptake in the Tibetan Plateau may actually offset the carbon that is released as permafrost melts. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes soil readings they analyzed from the region and what their findings suggest about carbon release in cold parts of the world.last_img read more

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why

first_img by NPR News Jon Hamilton 8.21.19 1:23pm In mice, scientists have used a variety of drugs to treat brain disorders including murine versions of Alzheimer’s disease, depression and schizophrenia. But in people, these same treatments usually fail. And now researchers are beginning to understand why. A detailed comparison of the cell types in mouse and human brain tissue found subtle but important differences that could affect the response to many drugs, a team reports Wednesday in the journal Nature.”If you want to develop a drug that targets a specific receptor in a specific disease, then these differences really matter,” says Christof Koch, an author of the study and chief scientist and president of the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle.One key difference involved genes that cause a cell to respond to the chemical messenger serotonin, says Ed Lein, a study author and investigator at the institute. “They’re expressed in both mouse and human, but they’re not in the same types of cells,” Lein says. As a result, “serotonin would have a very different function when released into the cortex of the two species.”That’s potentially a big deal because antidepressants like Prozac act on the brain’s serotonin system. So testing these drugs on mice could be misleading, Lein says.The comparison was possible because of new technology that allows scientists to quickly identify which of the hundreds of types of brain cells are present in a particular bit of brain tissue.The technology does this by detecting which genes are switched on in each cell. That reveals a genetic signature indicating the type of cell.”In one fell swoop you can get a more or less comprehensive understanding of all of the different types of cells that make up a brain region,” Lein says.This also makes it much easier to compare brain tissue from different species, he says.”We now have access to this fine level of resolution in the human brain and the ability to compare across and see how good a model a mouse or a monkey actually is,” Lein says.The list of cell types also should help researchers see what goes wrong in human brain disorders, Koch says.”A lot of neurological diseases, a lot of psychiatric diseases that we’re suffering from are due to specific defects in particular types of cells,” Koch says.For example, Parkinson’s disease affects brain cells that make a substance called dopamine. And epilepsy involves special cells that tamp down brain activity.Now, researchers have a way to make sure the types of cells involved in a particular disease work the same way in people as in an animal model, Koch says.”The technology finally caught up with what we’ve been needing to do for probably over 40 years,” says Tomasz Nowakowski, an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco who co-wrote an editorial that accompanied the study. To compare mouse and human brain cells, researchers first analyzed sixteen thousand human brain cells taken from the middle temporal gyrus, a part of the cortex, the brain’s outermost layer. Then they looked at cells taken from the same area of a mouse brain.”In one sense, they are remarkable similar,” Koch says, noting that both mice and people had about 100 different types of cells in this region of the brain.But a close comparison of 75 of these brain cell types revealed small differences.Nowakowsky is especially intrigued by the finding that cells called microglia have a slightly different genetic signature in mice and people.”Those cells are the immune cells of the brain,” he says. “And you might imagine that studies or insights into neuroimmune disorders, for example, might be vastly affected by this difference.”Neuroimmune disorders include multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. But there’s growing evidence that microglia also play an important role in Alzheimer’s disease.And that could be one reason experimental Alzheimer’s drugs have helped mice, but not people.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs… David Robertson, ICRlast_img read more

Trauma care centres to come up in major hospitals across Bengal

first_imgKolkata: The state government has chalked out a detailed plan to set up trauma care centres at various hospitals in the state, to ensure quick treatment to accident victims. The government will bear a cost of around Rs 45 crore for the construction of the trauma care centres and for buying equipments.According to initial plans, eight trauma care centres would be constructed in the first phase. The locations would be on or near national and state highways and other important roads. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt has been learnt that three trauma care centres would be located at SSKM Hospital, Bardhaman Medical College and Hospital (BMCH) and North Bengal Medical College and Hospital (NBMCH), while three others would be constructed at Kharagpur, Asansol and Islampur. The remaining two will be set up at Singur and Amtala.The critical patients would be admitted in the trauma care centres on an emergency basis. Accident victims or any trauma patient will be kept in the centres, where the patients would be given special care. These trauma care centres will have all the modern facilities to handle such patients. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe victims of fire incidents or those seriously injured in accidents, would be taken to the trauma care unit of the hospitals, where they would be given immediate attention. It is important to transfer these patients to a hospital equipped with trauma care facilities. This could save lives of many accident victims in the state, the senior officials of the state Health department said.The construction of the trauma care centre at BMCH has already been done. There will be 25 beds – 10 general, 10 critical care and five step down or high-dependency units (HDU). Accidents victims in the area are often brought to the city’s hospital and it takes a long time to shift a critical patient to the city. Had there been a trauma care unit at BMCH, people meeting with road accidents in the area can be provided treatment faster. The trauma care centre at NBMCH will be made operational soon.According to the Health department sources, the largest trauma care centre is coming up at the SSKM Hospital. It is expected that it can be made operational within September this year. Those coming up at BMCH, NBMCH and Singur will be of level 2 category, while the ones at Kharagpur and Islampur will be of level 3 category. A trauma care centre was inaugurated at RG Kar Medical College and Hospital, a few months ago. It may be mentioned that RG Kar Medical College and Hospital is the first medical college hospital in the state to have a separate dedicated building for trauma care. The eight-storeyed building of the trauma care unit has departments like medicine, neuro-medicine, neuro-surgery, orthopedic and anesthesiology. Patients are availing specialised health care facilities under the same roof. The new building has 150 beds.last_img read more

TMCP to crack down on those demanding money for admissions

first_imgKolkata: A day after Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee instructed police commissioner Rajeev Kumar to take stern action against those involved in collecting money for giving admission in colleges, Trinamool Chatra Parishad (TMCP) has also decided to crack the whip against such individuals.TMCP president Jaya Dutta will hold a meeting with student representatives from various colleges at Trinamool Bhavan beginning from Monday, giving clear instructions of abstaining from demanding money from any student for admission. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”The party has made it clear that those who will disobey the directions in this regard and will indulge in corruption for his/her own interest, will have to land in jail. There will be no place for him/her in the party,” Dutta said, who had been assigned the responsibility to communicate the party’s strong stand in this regard.It has been learnt that Dutta will hold a meeting with representatives from Central Kolkata colleges on Monday, South Kolkata colleges on Tuesday and North Kolkata colleges on Wednesday. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPIt may be mentioned that immediately after the CM’s instructions, Kolkata Police on Staurday posted a message on their Facebook page, inviting complaints against people who are demanding money to ensure admission to colleges. It has been learnt that the Chief Minister became furious after reports of students asking for money from freshers to get them admitted in different colleges surfaced in the media.Acting on two complaints, Kolkata Police have already arrested four students, for allegedly extorting money to arrange seats in colleges. Senior police officials are expected to visit some colleges in the city, to ensure smooth admission procedures on Monday. Extra police force will be deployed outside colleges where admissions are going on. Outsiders will not be allowed inside the college premises and only merit should be the criterion for admission.Kolkata Police has posted on Facebook, asking people to email or WhatsApp complaints about extortion related to college admissions.It may be mentioned that in the core committee meeting held at Netaji Indoor Stadium recently, Mamata Banerjee had categorically said that no money should be taken from students on the pretext of providing admissions in colleges and stern actions would be taken against those involved in the matter.The Bidhannagar City Police, on its Facebook and Twitter page, has put up an email id: bdncitypolice@gmmail.com and a WhatsApp number: 9051518444, on which a person can register his/her complaint if there is a demand for money for admission.last_img read more

Infant meets tragic fate after falling from moving autorickshaw

first_imgKolkata: In a tragic incident, a one-and-a-half-year old boy, who was travelling on her mother’s lap, died after falling from a moving auto-rickshaw.The incident took place on Tuesday morning at Vivek More in Baranagar. The victim’s mother, Rinki Sarkar, boarded the auto from Tobin Road and was going to Noapara. It was learnt that the baby fell from the vehicle when the auto-rickshaw was taking a sharp bend on AK Mukherjee road.Locals alleged that the vehicle was running at a high speed and this led to the incident. The victim’s mother got down from the vehicle after her son fell on the road. The auto-rickshaw driver fled the spot immediately after the incident. Locals rushed the victim to Baranagar State General Hospital where the doctors pronounced him brought dead. The victim had received severe head injuries after falling from the speeding vehicle. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifePolice said that Rinki Sarkar went to a market near Tobin road along with her son, Rajbir. They were returning home when the accident occurred.Some locals said the vehicle had a sudden jerk after it fell on a pothole. The victim’s mother, however, claimed that auto-rickshaw was running at a high speed and the driver did not slow down the vehicle despite repeated pleas.The woman informed police that her baby received critical injuries on his legs and head when he was run over by the same auto-rickshaw. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe auto-rickshaw driver stopped the vehicle at a distance. After being informed, police reached the spot and started a probe.The body of the victim has been sent to College of Medicine and Sagore Dutta Hospital for an autopsy.The local councillor, Anjan Pal, who visited the spot said the auto-rickshaw was not at a high speed at the time of the incident and termed it a mere accident.The family members of the victim boy lodged a complaint at the Baranagar police station on the basis of which police started a detailed probe.Raids are being conducted to nab the auto-rickshaw driver.last_img read more

With no word yet from producers Tollywood imbroglio continues

first_imgKolkata: The stalemate in the shooting of television serials in Tollywood continues as the artistes and technicians are yet to arrive at a negotiation with the producers.The ceasework is the result of a demand by the Artistes’ Forum to regularise pay. The talks between it and the Welfare Association of Television Producers (WATP) are yet to yield results.In a Press release issued on Tuesday by the Federation of Cine Technicians and Workers of Eastern India, signed by senior artistes like Soumitra Chatterjee, its president, Prosenjit Chatterjee, its working president and Arindam Ganguly, general secretary, the artistes have agreed to join work the moment WATP agrees to implement the MoU signed between the producers and the artistes. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe future of nearly 10,000 artistes and technicians has become uncertain because of the stalemate. The artistes have also agreed to sit with the producers.Actor Prosenjit Chatterjee told newsmen that the Artistes’ Forum did not wish to disrupt shooting schedules of TV serials, but the July 8 agreement between the Television Producers’ body should be respected and artistes should be paid regularly.While the agreement between producers and the forum had stipulated that the artistes should get their salaries within the 15th day of the next month, many producers did not honour it and did not arrange the payment overdue to the artistes, Chatterjee maintained. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedHe said in the given situation, it is not possible to resume work unless the producers pay the arrears. Chatterjee made it clear though that he was only referring to a section of producers and not all. The ceasework has been disrupting the overall shooting schedules.Forum general secretary and actor Arindam Ganguly said the July 8 agreement had also specified that any artiste working for more than 10 hours should be paid on an hourly basis after the expiry of the scheduled time. That too had not been honoured by a section of producers.He said the state government is aware of the situation. “Minister Aroop Biswas has been updated of the developments at the meeting and he is trying to arrive at a solution,” he added. Meanwhile, there was no shooting during the day in all the eight studios located across different areas of South Kolkata, due to the ceasework.last_img read more

Fire breaks out at godown in Rajarhat no casualties

first_imgKolkata: A fire broke out at a warehouse at Podra near Langolpota in Rajarhat on Thursday morning. Firefighters brought the flames under control at around 5.20 pm. However, none has been injured in the incident.According to the firefighters, the godown was filled with large quantities of handcraft items (both finished and unfinished), which were extremely inflammable. Fire safety equipment was not present at the premises.At around 7 am, some local residents noticed smoke coming out from a two-storied godown beside Rajarhat Road. Sensing danger, locals immediately rushed inside the godown campus and alerted the workers who were inside. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeWith the help of passerby and residents of the area, all the workers were safely evacuated from the godown. Police and fire & emergency services were also informed. After receiving information, both firefighters and police reached the spot without delay.As there were no other house or construction adjacent to the godown, firefighters got the situation under control. But since the fire had captured the whole godown, they faced difficulties in arresting the fire fast. At first 5 fire tenders were pressed into action. But as time passed, firefighters called for backup. At noon, more fire tenders were sent to the spot from various fire & emergency service stations.Finally, with the help of 14 fire tenders, the blaze was arrested at around 5:20 pm. According to the police, no one has been injured in the incident. Later, a mobile forensic unit visited the godown and collected samples. The godown in-charge Ashoke Nandi has been detained by the police for further investigation.last_img read more